Location: Union County NC

Slave Narrative of Mandy Coverson

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Mandy Coverson Location: 103 South Wilmington Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Location of Birth: Union County NC Age: 78 Ex-Slave Story An interview with Mandy Coverson, 78, of 103 South Wilmington Street, Raleigh. I wuz borned in Union County to Sarah an’ Henderson Tomberlin. My mother belonged to Mr. Moses Coverson, an’ my pappy belonged to Mr. Jackie Tom Tomberlin. I stayed wid my mammy, of course, an’ Marster Moses wuz good ter me. Dey warn’t so good ter my mammy, case dey makes her wuck frum sunup till sundown in de hot summertime, an’ she ain’t had no fun at all. She plowed two oxes, an’ if’en yo’ has eber been around a steer yo’ knows what aggravatin’ things dey is. De oberseer, whose name I’se plumb forget, wuz pore white trash an’ he wuz meaner dan de meanest nigger. Anyhow I wuz too little ter do much wuck so I played a heap an’ I had a big time. My mammy, died ‘fore I wuz very old an’ missus kept me in de house. I wuz petted by her, an’ I reckon spoiled. Yo’ knows dat den de niggers ain’t neber eat no biscuits but missus always gimmie one eber meal an’ in dat way she got me interested in waitin’ on de table. I wuzn’t old enough ter know much, but...

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Waxhaw Indians

Waxhaw Tribe: Meaning unknown. Also called: Flatheads, a name given to this tribe and others of the Catawba connection owing to their custom of deforming the head. Waxhaw Connection. Nothing of their language has been preserved, but circumstantial evidence points to a close relationship between the Waxhaw and the Catawba and hence to membership in the Siouan linguistic stock. Their closest contacts appear to have been with the Sugeree. Waxhaw Location. In Lancaster County, S. C., and Union and Mecklenburg Counties, N. C. Waxhaw Villages. Lawson mentions two villages in 1701 but the names are not given. Waxhaw History. The Waxhaw were possibly the Gueza of Vandera, who lived in western South Carolina in 1566-67. Lederer (1912) writing about 1670, speaks of the Waxhaw under the name Wisacky and says that they were subject to and might be considered a part of the Catawba. They were probably identical with the Weesock, whose children were said by Gabriel Arthur (1918) to be brought up in Tamahita (Yuchi) families “as ye Ianesaryes are mongst ye Turkes.” Lawson (1860) visited them in 1701. At the end of the Yamasee War, they refused to make peace with the English and were set upon by the Catawba and the greater part of them killed. The rest fled to the Cheraw, but a band numbering 25 accompanied the Yamasee to Florida in 1715 and are...

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R. E. Lee

Seaman 2nd Class, U. S. Navy; of Union County; son of W. S. and Ella Lee Entered service June 14, 1918, at Monroe, N.C. Sent to Naval Base, Hampton Roads, Va. Promoted to rank of Seaman 2nd Class when enlisted. Mustered out at Camp Hampton Roads, Va., Dec. 1,...

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Jason I. Stroud

1st Class Private, 324th Regt., 81st Div., Hdqrs. Co. Born in Union County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Stroud. Entered the service May 25, 1918, at Wilson, N.C. Was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and from there to Camp Mills. Sailed for France Aug. 5, 1918. Fought on Meuse-Argonne Front. Returned to the USA June 17, 1919, and was mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., June 25,...

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Frank Townley Redfearn

2nd Lt., Inf., Co. F, 3rd Pioneer Regt.; of Union County; son of R. and Mrs. Mary Redfearn. Entered service Aug. 27, 1917, at Monroe, N.C. Sent to Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga. Transferred to Ft. McIntosh, Texas, then to Camp Wadsworth. Sailed for France Aug. 30, 1918. Comm. 2nd Lt. Nov. 27, 1917. Fought at Meuse-Argonne offensive. Returned to USA July 24, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., Aug. 15,...

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James M. Morrow, Jr.

Sergt. 1st Class, F. A. C. O. T. S., 41st Battery; of Union County; son of J. M., Sr., and Caroline Morrow. Entered service August 4, 1917, at Charlotte, N.C. Sent to Ft. Thomas, Ky., from there to Kelly Field, Texas, then to Ft. Sam Houston, Texas. Promoted to rank of Sergt. Dec. 24, 1917. Sergt., 1st Class, March 15, 1918. While at Kelly Field was Sergt. in 109th Aero Squadron; at St. Sam Houston was Sergt., 1st Class, in 817th Aero Squadron and worked in Air Service Dept., Headquarters Southern Department. Held same rank at Field Artillery Central Officers Training School at Camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. Mustered out at Camp Taylor, Ky., November 30,...

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Henry C. Newsome

Private, Med. Corps, 81st Div., 306th Regt., Amntn. Tr. Born in Union County; son of A. M. and Mrs. Sally Newsome. Husband of Mrs. Jennie W. Newsome. Entered service April 25, 1918, at Marshville, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson. Transferred to Camp Mills. Sailed for France Aug. 8, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne. Returned to USA June, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson June 24,...

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Frank H. McCollum

Private, Btry. F, 9th F. A. Born in Union County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. McCollum. Entered the service Aug. 27, 1918, at Monroe, N.C. Was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and from there to Camp Hill, Va. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., Dec. 7,...

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Daniel S. McCollum

Private, Co. D, 30th Div., 113th M. G. Regt. Born in Union County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. McCollum. Entered the service at Monroe, N.C., Sept. 8, 1917. Was sent to Camp Jackson and from there to Sevier. Transferred to Camp Merritt. Sailed for France May 8, 1918. Was in all battles with his company. Returned to USA March 24, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 2,...

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Louie F. Hart

Private, Pioneer, Inf., Co. C, 56th Regt.; of Union County; son of S. B. and Hattie Hart. Entered service Aug. 8, 1918, at Monroe, N.C. Sent to Camp Wadsworth. Transferred to Camp Merritt. Sailed for France, Sept. 4, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne, then with Army of Occupation from Dec., 1918, to May, 1919. Returned to USA June 25, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., July 5,...

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Jason H. Helms

Musician, Navy. Born in Union County; son of Mr. and Mrs. T. L. A. Helms. Entered service June 27, 1917, at Monroe, N.C. Sent to Norfolk, Va., and then transferred to U. S. S. “Minnesota,” then to U. S. S. “Utah.” On convoy and patrol duty off Irish Coast with “Utah.” Mustered out at Norfolk, Va., Aug. 12,...

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Joseph A. Helms

Ensign, Navy. Born in Union County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. T. L. A. Helms. Entered service at Monroe June 1, 1917. Was sent to Brooklyn and from there to Norfolk, Va. Was sent to Engineering School in New York. Promoted to rank of Ensign July, 1919. Mustered out in New York, Aug.,...

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Bryson Blake Belk

Sergt. Air Service Co., 80th Squadron; of Union County; son of S. E. and Mary Belk. Entered service Aug. 2, 1917, at Charlotte, N.C. Sent to Ft. Thomas, Ky., then to Kelly Field, Texas. Transferred to Long Island, N. Y. Sailed for France Dec. 25, 1918, 3rd Aviation Center. Promoted to rank of Corpl. Aug. 24, 1917, and then Sergt. Served 15 months in the Air Service overseas. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 8,...

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Waxhaw Tribe

Waxhaw Indians. A small tribe that lived in the 17th century in what is now Lancaster County, South Carolina, and Union and Mecklenburg Counties, North Carolina. They were connected with the neighboring Sugeree, and both were apparently related to the Catawba, and therefore were Siouan. The custom of flattening the head, practiced by the Waxhaw, was also mentioned as a custom of the Catawba. Lederer (1672) says they were subject to and might be considered a part of the Catawba. Lawson visited the Waxhaw in 1701 and was hospitably received. He mentions two of their villages situated about 10 miles apart. He describes the people as very tall, and notes particularly their custom of artificially flattening the head during infancy. The dance ceremonies and councils were held in a council house, much larger than the ordinary dwellings. Instead of being covered with bark, like the domiciles, it was neatly thatched with sedge and rushes; the entrance was low, and around the walls on the inside were benches made of cane. Near the Waxhaw were the Catawba, or more likely a band of that tribe. They were probably so reduced by the Yamasee War of 1715 as to have been obliged to incorporate with the Catawba. For Further Study The following articles and manuscripts will shed additional light on the Waxhaw as both an ethnological study, and as a people....

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The Waxhaw and Sugeree Indians

The two small tribes bearing the above designations are hardly known except in connection with the Catawba Indians, with whom they were afterward incorporated. They may be treated together. The tribes lived, respectively, about Waxhaw and Sugar (i. e., Sugeree) creeks, two small streams flowing into Catawba River from the northeast, within, what is now Lancaster County, South Carolina, and Union and Mecklenburg counties, North Carolina. As previously mentioned (The Eno, Shoccoree, and Adshusheer indians) the Waxhaw practiced the custom of flattening the head, a custom probably followed also by the Catawba and other neighboring tribes, whence they were called Flatheads. The first notice of either tribe seems to be that of Lederer, who visited, the Wisacky (Warsaw) in 1672, and found them living next south of the Sara, i. e., about where they were afterward known. He dismisses them with the brief statement that they were subject to the Ushery (Catawba) and might be considered a part of that tribe 1Lederer, John. The discoveries of John Lederer, in three several marches from Virginia to the west of Carolina, and other parts of the continent. Begun in March, 1669, and ended in September, 1670. Together with a general map of the whole territory which he traversed. Collected and translated out of Latin from his discourse and writings, by Sir William Talbot, baronet, etc. London, etc. 1672, p. 17. Map...

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