Location: Trimble County KY

Slave Narrative of Matthew Hume

Interviewer: Grace Monroe Person Interviewed: Matthew Hume Location: Indiana Grace Monroe Dist. 4 Jefferson County SLAVE STORY MR. MATTHEW HUME, A FORMER SLAVE Mr. Hume had many interesting experiences to tell concerning the part slavery had played in his family. On the whole they were fortunate in having a good master who would not keep an overseer who whipped his “blacks”. His father, Luke Hume, lived in Trimble County Kentucky and was allowed to raise for himself one acre of tobacco, one acre of corn, garden stuff, chickens and have the milk and butter from one cow. He was advised to save his money by the overseer, but always drank it up. On this plantation all the slaves were free from Saturday noon until Monday morning and on Christmas and the Fourth of July. A majority of them would go to Bedford or Milton and drink, gamble and fight. On the neighboring farm the slaves were treated cruelly. Mr. Hume had a brother-in-law, Steve Lewis, who carried marks on his back. For years he had a sore that would not heal where his master had struck him with a blacksnake whip. Three good overseers were Jake Mack and Mr. Crafton, Mr. Daniel Payne was the owner who asked his people to report any mistreatment to him. He expected obedience however. When Mr. Hume was a small boy he was...

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Biography of Tiffin P. Logan

Tiffin P. Logan, land and loan agent, Mattoon; was born in Trimble Co., Ky., March 28, 1844; his father was a man of prominence, a cousin to President Harrison, and was honored by the Democratic party with a seat in the Kentucky Legislature during the sessions of 1844-45; in the spring of 1858, removed with his family to Illinois, and located in Windsor, Shelby Co.; here he occupied the office of Justice of the Peace eleven years in succession; here Tiffin P. began life for himself; he lived with his brother-in-law till he attained the age of 15 years; at this age he could neither read nor write; leaving his taskmaster, he determined to lend his energies to the acquiring of an education; by the performance of various commissions he paid his board, tuition, and other necessary expenses, and at the expiration of three years, had acquired a good elementary education, and had $8 ahead; March 8, 1864, he located where Ottawa, Kan., now is, then occupied by eleven tribes of Indians; with these, he lived some six weeks, sole representative of the Caucasian race; here, with a capital of $41, he began the manufacture of shingles, and in nine months accumulated $1,200; owing to ill health, he closed out his business, and engaged in clerking for Holt & Evans, the first white men operating a store in Ottawa;...

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Biographical Sketch of John W. Miller

John W. Miller, farmer and stock-dealer, Sec. 1; P. O. Charleston; owns 800 acres, worth $40 per acre; he was born in Trimble Co., Ky., March 13, 1825; he lived in Kentucky until 12 years of age; then emigrated to Coles Co., Ill.. where he lived with his father on the farm; engaged in farming until he married Rebecca A. Tremble, June 26, 1851; she was born in Harrison Co., Ind., July 15, 1828; the fruit of this marriage was eight children, five living and three dead; the names of the living are Cephas, Horana, Armantha, John and James; the names of the deceased are George, Elizabeth and Quitman. Mr. Miller went to California in 1849, returning in 1851; he also went to Pike’s Peak; he is highly respected in his...

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Biographical Sketch of J. L. F. Miller

J. L. F. Miller, farmer and stock-dealer, Sec. 9; P. O. Mattoon; owns 337 acres; was born in Trimble Co., Ky., Jan. 9, 1829, and engaged with his father in farming until 23 years of age. He was married to Rachel P. Gray Nov. 27, 1857; she was born in Tennessee April 19, 1829, died May 2, 1860; the fruit of this marriage was two children – George L. and Rachel E. Mr. Miller then married Mary J. Romine Feb. 25, 1866; she was born in Vigo Co., Ind., July 3, 1841; the fruit of this marriage is eight children – Lola, Mattie, Clara, Mary T., Bertha, Katie and Clinton, and one infant deceased. Mr. Miller commenced with but little property and by his honesty, industry and economy has accumulated considerable...

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Biography of Dr. William H. Ball

Among the noticeable fine orange groves of Riverside is that owned by the above named gentleman. His grove, of twenty acres in extent, is situated on the southeast corner of Cypress and Bandini avenues, about one and one-half miles south of the business centre of Riverside. Dr. Ball purchased the land in 1875, and the next spring commenced its improvement, first planting 800 seedling orange trees and the balance to deciduous fruits: the last named he has since replaced with citrus fruits. At this writing his orange grove comprises 1,150 seedlings and 800 budded trees of the Mediterranean Sweets, Washington Navel, Malta Blood, and Duroi varieties, besides his citrus fruits and grapes for family use: his fine groves show the care and attention of a thorough horticulturist, and his success is attested by the fact that his thirteen year-old trees, seedlings, in 1888 yield $300 per acre net. The other trees are of various ages and not in full bearing, but their proportionate yield is even larger than that above given. The Doctor took this land when in its comparatively wild state, and has just cause to be proud of the results of his year’s labor. Dr. Ball also owns twenty acres of land about three miles south of his home place, located in section 32, south of Jurupa Avenue. This land was purchased in 1890, and will in...

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Trimble County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Trimble County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Trimble County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Trimble County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Trimble County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Trimble County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Trimble County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 Trimble County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Trimble County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1840 Trimble County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Trimble County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Census Index Pages 311-319 Pages 320-326 Pages 327-334 Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Trimble County, Kentucky Census Records Hosted at Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1850 Trimble County, Kentucky...

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Biography of William H. Brown

William H. Brown, farmer and stock-raiser ;P. O. Ashmore; was born in Oneida Co., N. Y., March 23, 1813, being a son of Jonathan W. and Elizabeth (Aiken) Brown, and accompanied his parents in their removal to Milton, Ky., to Lawrence Co., Ill., and to the Walnut Grove, Edgar Co., in January, 1825. He remained at home until he was nearly 21, when he began working on a farm; he worked at various employments in different places until he was married, Nov. 4, 1835, to Miss Elizabeth McGhan, of Clark Co.; he then settled on a farm in Clark Co. During the summer of 1835, he was associated with his father and brother in grading a portion of the old Terre Haute & Alton Railroad. His wife died Sept. 14, 1838, leaving one son, William W., who, in the late war was Orderly Sergeant of Co. H, 10th I. V. C., and was killed at the capture of Little Rock, Ark. In the spring of 1839, Mr. Brown came to Coles Co., and on the 13th of June, 1839, married Mrs. Emily Buck, a daughter of John T. Olmsted, an old pioneer of Edgar Co., settling in Grand View about 1828, and afterward came to Coles Co.- Of nine children of this marriage, six are now living – John O. (now a resident of Charleston, Harriet, wife of James...

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Biography of Jobe W. Brown

Jobe W. Brown, retired, Ashmore; this gentleman was born in Chatham, Middlesex Co., Conn., July 15, 1809; his father was Jonathan W. Brown, and his mother’s maiden name was Elizabeth Aiken, the former being a native of Connecticut, and the latter of the island of Nantucket; when he was but a child, his parents removed to Oneida Co., N. Y., thence to Milton, Ky., and in 1822 to Lawrence Co., Ill.; in January, 1825, they removed to Walnut Grove in Edgar Co., then on the very outskirts of civilization; at that time there was not a single white inhabitant in the present limits of Coles Co.; his father resided there until his death June 17, 1867, at the age of 79 years. In 1840, Mr. Brown removed to Ashmore Tp., where he had entered eighty acres of land, borrowing for that purpose $100; to illustrate the struggles of those early days, we may mention that Mr. Brown was thirteen years in taking up this first note; he has hauled wheat to Chicago, taking his provisions and horse feed along with him, and sleeping in his wagon at night; the journey occupied sixteen days, and on arriving there, has sold his wheat at 50 cents a bushel. In 1838, he, with his father and brother, took a contract to build two sections of the old Terre Haute & Alton R....

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