Location: Tipton Missouri

Biography of William Alfred Clark, A. M., M. D.

It is seldom that one attains prominence along several lines, but Dr. William Alfred Clark of Jefferson City is regarded as one of the eminent surgeons of the state and in 1918 served as president of the Missouri state board of health, while in Masonic circles he has also been accorded a place of distinction and leadership, having been grand master of the order in Missouri in 1917 and 1918. He is numbered among Missouri’s native sons, his birth having occurred in Clarksburg, Moniteau county, September 11, 1865. He was the eldest of ten children, four sons and six daughters. His ancestors were Scotch-Irish but when they migrated to America is not definitely known. The first authentic knowledge concerning their residence in this country is that they went to Kentucky from Guilford Court House, North Carolina, and in 1833, the grandfather of Dr. Clark left Logan county, Kentucky, and drove across the country in an ox wagon, settling in Moniteau county, Missouri. He took up his abode on the broad prairie where the village of Clarksburg now stands and the town was named in his honor. The doctor’s father, George T. Clark, was born in Kentucky in 1830 and passed away about 1893. He lived most of his life in Clarksburg and married Mary B. Yancey, a descendant of Leighton Yancey, who migrated from Virginia to Missouri and was...

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Biography of Thomas K. Tomson

Thomas K. Tomson. A life of more than ordinary fruitfulness and influence came to a close with the death of Thomas K. Tomson at his home in Dover, Shawnee County, November 2, 1910. He was one of the ante-bellum settlers of Kansas. In the fifty years of his residence in the state his name became widely known and respected and as a farmer and stockman he was one of the most successful in his section of the state. He was in his eighty-fifth year when death called him. He was born in Mahoning County, Ohio, September 25, 1826. He grew up there and there married his first wife, who died soon afterward. Though he acquired the tinsmith’s trade, farming and the handling of stock constituted his major vocations. In the early ’50s, with his second wife, whose maiden name was Elizabeth C. Davis, and a daughter, he came west and for a time lived near Fort Madison, Iowa. From there he removed to Tipton, Missouri. While his family lived at Tipton he spent most of his time on a boat plying the Mississippi River. His occupation was the making of tinware and the selling of the product to stores in the towns along the river. Those were years when the strife between the anti and pro-slavery people was reaching its final stage of bitterness. Around Tipton, Missouri, the pro-slavery...

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Biography of Wilber A. Cochel, Prof.

Prof. Wilber A. Cochel. There is no doubt but that educational education means more to the United States today than any other kind of education and great institutions like the Kansas State Agricultural College are standard bearers in disseminating agricultural knowledge. This college management, with remarkable judgment, has gathered together a group of thoroughly trained instructors covering every phase of agriculture, the agriculture of modern progress. At the head of the animal husbandry division is found Prof. Wilber A. Coehel, a scholar and scientist whose name carries weight in many states of the Union on account of his discoveries and solid achievements. Wilber A. Cochel was born at Tipton, Missouri, August 7, 1877, and is a son of William H. and Charlotte (Calvin) Cochel. He was reared at Tipton where his father was a hardware merchant and also a farmer. On his father’s farm he gained his first practical lessons in agriculture, not unwillingly, for he has always loved the soil and been interested in its development and possibilities. He was afforded educational advantages and after being graduated from the Tipton High School, he entered the academic department of the University of Missouri, from which he was graduated in 1897. During the succeeding five years Mr. Cochel was mainly engaged in general farming, stockraising and feeding and dealing in cattle. Desiring further scientific knowledge he entered the agricultural department...

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Biography of George L. Atkeson

George L. Atkeson. To those parents who value the intellectual development of their children, it is a matter of vital importance that in the early and formative period of their lives, their instructors in the public schools should be thoroughly qualified for such responsibility in scholarly attainments and in personal character. In securing so widely known and so experienced an educator as George L. Atkeson as superintendent of their city schools, the good people of Altoona, Kansas, displayed exceptional wisdom. Intelligent public opinion here, as at other points, makes more insistent demands, asks for more decided results than in old days, a realization having come that the needs of future generations must not be imperiled by any narrowing of public school education in the present. A wider and deeper service is demanded than ever before, and to this field of effort a welcome is given the able, the understanding, the progressive educational leader, a worthy example of this class being found in George L. Atkeson. He is a native of Missouri, born near Tipton, in Morgan County, September 20, 1866. His parents were Francis M. and Mary A. (Frye) Atkeson. Francis M. Atkeson was born in 1830, near Charleston in Kanawha County, West Virginia, in which section the early ancestors of the family had settled after coming from England. His father, Andrew Atkeson, was also born in what is...

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