Location: Tama County IA

Fox Indians

Fox Indians. A name thought to have been derived from that of the Fox clan and to have been applied to the tribe through a misunderstanding. Also called: Beshde’ke, Dakota name. Meshkwa kihig’, own name signifying “red earth people,” from the kind of earth from which they are supposed to have been created. O-dug-am-eeg, Chippewa name, meaning “those who live on the opposite side. Skaxshurunu, Wyandot name, meaning “fox people.” Skuakisagi, Shawnee name. To-che-wah-coo, probably the Arikara name. Wakusheg, Potawatomi name, meaning “foxes.” Fox Connections. The Foxes belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family and in one group with the Sauk and Kickapoo. Fox Location. In the vicinity of Lake Winnebago or along Fox River. (See also Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, and Oklahoma.) Fox History. Since the closely related Sauk Indians came to Wisconsin from Saginaw Bay, Michigan, it is probable that the Foxes once lived in that region as well, but it is uncertain. There is also a tradition that they were in northern Wisconsin and were driven south by the Chippewa. The French missionaries heard of them as early as 1640, and in 1670 found them in the location above given, where they remained for a long period. They were constantly at war with the Chippewa, and though they received aid from the Dakota, obtained little advantage in these contests. It was on account of...

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Biography of John Russell Stewart

John Russell Stewart. As a citizen who for many years was closely identified with journalism and local affairs in Champaign County, the people of this section feel a corresponding interest in the personality and career of John Russell Stewart. As supervising editor of this publication, the publishers feel that this interest should be gratified by the inclusion of a brief personal biography. He was born on his father’s farm in Butler County, Pennsylvania, November 6, 1840, a son of William and Eliza Jane (Gibson) Stewart, who were both of direct Scotch-Irish descent. Mr. Stewart received his education in the local public schools and private academies, grew up on his father’s farm, and at the age of eighteen qualified for work as a teacher and was in the schoolroom in that capacity for four terms. Coming west in 1863, he found work in the public schools of Scott County, Iowa. In the same year he had volunteered his services to the Union army in the Civil War, but was rejected on account of defective eyesight. After four years in Scott County, Iowa, he moved to Tama County, and became superintendent of schools at Toledo, the county seat. In 1868, he was elected superintendent of the Tama County public schools and filled that office until the time of the Chicago fire in 1871. As early as 1860 Mr. Stewart became deeply...

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Biography of D. B. Hendricks

D.B. HENDRICKS. – The well-known merchant and financier, whose name initiates this paragraph, is one of the representative business men of Elgin, and indeed of union county, doing at the present time a large and lucrative business in general merchandise, while in all his career he has displayed a breadth of comprehension and aggressiveness that, coupled with a conservative policy and dominated by keen practical judgement and sagacity, have made him the master of hte enterprises that have been taken up by him, while also he has maintained an untarnished repuation and is one of the prominent men of our county today. On February 6,1855, Mr. Henricks was born in Fairfield county,Ohio, to John and Nancy (Hufford) Hendricks, natives respectively of Ohio and Pennsylvania, but removing to Tama county, Iowa, in the fall of 1864, where they engaged in farming until the time that death took them from the activities of this life, the mother passing beyond in 1872, and the father taking his departure in 1883. Our subject worked with his father until he reached the age of majority and then engaged in farming for himself in Iowa until 1882, when he came to the fertile regions of the west, entering the saw milling business in Morrow county where he labored for five years, then took upsheep raising in the John Day country with one Mr. Woolery, where...

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Houses of the Sauk and Fox Tribes

It is not the purpose of the present sketch to trace the early migrations of the Sauk and Fox tribes, or to refer to their connection, linguistically or socially. However, it is evident their villages were similar in appearance, and both had two distinct forms of habitations which were occupied during different seasons of the year. The summer villages of both tribes consisted of bark houses, and near by were gardens in which they raised corn, squashes, beans, and some tobacco, but with the coming of autumn the families scattered and sought the more protected localities where game was to...

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Biographical Sketch of Oliver Farrar Emerson

Emerson, Oliver Farrar; university professor; born, Traer, Ia., May 24, 1860; son of Oliver and Maria Farrar Emerson; A. B., Iowa College, 1882, A. M., 1885; Ph. D., Cornell University, 1891; married, Annie L. Logan, of St. Louis, Sept. 24, 1891; supt. schools, Grinnell, Ia., 1882-1884, Muscatine, Ia., 1884-1885; prin. Academy of Iowa College, 1885-1888; Goldwin Smith fellow in English, 1888-1889, instru. in English, 1889-1891; asst. prof. rhetoric and English philology, 1892-1896, Cornell University; prof. English, Western Reserve University, since 1896; member Modern Language Ass’n America, American Dialect Society (pres., 1905). Author: History of the English Language, 1894; A Brief History of the English Language, 1896; Middle English Reader, 1905; Outline History of the English Language, 1906. Editor: Johnson’s Rasselas, 1905; Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Edward Gibbon, 1898; Poems of Chancer, 1911. Contributor to Modern Language Notes, Dialect Notes, Publications of Modern Language Ass’n, Modern Philology, Journal of Germanic Philology, Anglia,...

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Biographical Sketch of Frank Eugene Wettstein

Wettstein, Frank Eugene; banking and real estate; born, Rochelle, Ill., June 6, 1867; son of Otto and Louise Tracy Wettstein; educated, Rochelle High School, class of 1884; married, La Porte City, Ia., Sept. 22, 1896; married Maud Wagoner; issue, two sons, William and Frank Jr.; republican; five years a member of the Illinois National Guard; in 1889, organized First National Bank, La Porte City, Ia.; in 1900, organized First National Bank, Dysort, Ia.; vice pres. and gen. mgr. Guarantee Title & Trust Co.. Cleveland; 1903 to 1908, promoted Gates Mills property; built all roads at Gates Mills; pres. Pease Engineering Co., 1904 to 1908; chairman Board of Trustees, Cleveland Homeopathic Medical College, 1907-1909; chairman Finance Committee, Cleveland Associated Charities, 1906-1908; sec’y and treas. Maple Leaf Land Co., sec’y and treas. Davenport, Ia., Land & Investment Co.; trustee Cleveland Pulte Medical College; Mason; also member Union and Tippecanoe Clubs and Cleveland Chamber of...

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Biography of Orion Littell Rider

Orion Littell Rider, a leading attorney of Vinita whose professional ability is indicated by the large and distinctively representative clientage accorded hire, has served his fellow citizens in various capacities and has always done able and conscientious work. His birth occurred in Mason county, Illinois, on the 7th of January, 1874, and his parents were Dr. Robert G. and Harriet M. (Littell) Rider, the former born near Cleveland, Ohio, and the latter in the state of New Jersey. The father was a physician, acquiring his professional training in Pennsylvania, and he first opened an office at Mobile, Alabama, whence he removed to Havana, Illinois, where he engaged in practice until the outbreak of the Civil war, when his patriotic spirit prompted him to lay aside all personal considerations. On the 1st of October, 1862, he was made captain of Company K, Eighty-fifth Illinois Infantry, which he had raised, and on the 12th of May, 1863, won promotion to the rank of major. He participated in the battle of Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia, and remained in command of his regiment until wounded near the close of the war. After receiving his discharge from the service he returned to Havana, Illinois, where he continued to follow his profession until 1880, when he removed to Ringgold county, Iowa, where he engaged in practice for four years, and then lived retired until his death,...

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Biography of Captain Lyman C. Waite

Captain Lyman C. Waite is one of the pioneers of Riverside. His association with the foundation of the colony, the establishment of schools, churches, horticultural industries, banking, and other incorporations, commenced in the infancy of the colony, and his various enterprises, both public and private, have been conducted by that sound sense, trained business principles, and honest, straightforward dealings that are characteristic of the man. The facts obtained for a brief review of his life are of interest. Captain Waite was born in Walworth County, Wisconsin, in 1844. His parents, Sydney and Parmelia (Barker) Waite, were natives of western New York. They were pioneers of Wisconsin, having established themselves in that State as early as 1836 or 1837. His father was a farmer by occupation, and during Captain Waite’s boyhood was a resident of Sheboygan Falls, Fond du Lac and Appleton. The subject of this sketch was reared to farm life, and being of a studious disposition was given the best advantages the public schools afforded in securing an education. In 1860 he entered upon a course of study in the Lawrence University at Appleton. The war of the Rebellion and the call upon the nation’s sons to rally to the support of the old flag, and preserve our country from secession rule, enlisted the patriotic sympathy of young Waite, and he abandoned his college studies and promptly entered...

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Biography of Edwin Hart

Among the leading horticulturists of Riverside colony none are more deserving of mention than the subject of this sketch. Mr. Hart is a native of Cortland County, New York, born in 1835, and reared and received his education in his native place. At the age of eighteen years he started for the great West, and located in Beloit, Wisconsin. His boyhood days, when not attending school, were spent in his father’s store, and was somewhat schooled in mercantile life, but upon his advent in Wisconsin he engaged in farming. He spent eight years in that State, and in 1862 moved to Iowa, and settled near Belle Plain in Tama County. Mr. Hart settled down to farm life, but the war of the Rebellion, then raging, appealed so strongly to his patriotism that he entered the United States military service as a private in the Sixth Regiment of Iowa Cavalry. The Indian outbreak of the Northwest was then at its height, and his command sent him in that direction. He participated in the Indian wars and campaigns that followed, and served faithfully, discharging his duties in a soldierly manner, and was promoted to be Sergeant. It was not until the fall of 1865 that he received his honorable discharge from the service. After this he spent a year in Wisconsin, and in 1866 returned to Iowa and continued his farming...

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Biography of Kelita Davis Shugart, M. D.

Kelita Davis Shugart, M. D. No history of Riverside can be considered complete without a more than passing mention of the pioneer of Riverside colony whose name heads this sketch. In 1869 Dr. Shugart was a resident of Belle Plain, Iowa, and at that time was desirous of establishing his residence in some portion of Southern California. Early the next year he associated himself with Judge North, Dr. Greves, Sanford Eastman, C. N. Felton, of San Francisco, and Captain Broadhurst and others, and formed the Southern California Colony Association. The object of the association was to purchase some desirable tract of land in Southern California and establish a colony, build up desirable homes, and engage in horticultural pursuits. Some months were spent by members of the association in seeking a suitable location, but they were unable to decide the vexed question. The Doctor became impatient at the delay, and in August of 1870 came to California and joined his associates. Judge E. G. Brown, who had joined the company, and Dr. J. P. Greves, visited the Riverside Valley in June, and made a partial examination of the lands, water supply, etc., and strongly recommended the purchase of lands by the association; but nothing was done. On August 25, 1870, Dr. Shugart, accompanied by Dr. Greves, Messrs. Luther, of San Francisco, and Stewart, of San Bernardino, visited the lands and...

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Biography of Albert M. Beal, M. D.

The technical education of the doctor of medicine avails him but little unless he has laid a foundation for it of broad general knowledge and made a careful study of human nature. When he took up the practice of medicine Doctor Albert M. Beal brought to the profession a mental equipment such as few men acquire in a lifetime. For years he had been an educator, teaching the common branches in the public schools and later specializing in college. Having as a student earned the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts, he later found opportunity to perfect his knowledge of law so that he was admitted to the bar after successfully passing the prescribed examination. With this preparation the mysteries of medicine and surgery were quickly mastered and success was his from the beginning of his professional career. Doctor Beal was born October 31, 1853, in Zuma Township, Rock Island County. His parents were Daniel N. and Betsy (Spencer) Beal, pioneers of the community. The son attended the country schools and later the public institutions of learning of Port Byron and Rock Island. At the age of seventeen he began teaching school at what is now Barstow. He entered Western College of Iowa when his preparatory studies had been completed, and graduated with the class of 1876, taking the degree of Bachelor of Arts. The following...

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Biographical Sketch of Hector Baxter

Hector Baxter, a farmer of Maple Township, Ida County, Iowa, was born in Argyleshire, Scotland, June 16, 1834. His parents were John and Mary (McNeil) Baxter, natives also of that country where they lived and died. Hector was reared and educated in Scotland where he learned and followed the trade of shoemaker for many years. In 1877, he left his native land for the United States, and after landing in New York, purchased and improved 160 acres of wild land in Tama County, Iowa. He sold this land in 1881, and bought 320 acres in Ida County. He built a two-story, eight-room house, along with a barn. He engaged in farming and stock-raising, making a specialty of shorthorn cattle. He was married at the age of 25 years to Margaret Stuart, a daughter of John and Helen (Cockburn) Stuart of Scotland. Mr. And Mrs. Baxter had seven children, namely: Nellie (wife of Dr. F. B. Warnock), John, James, William, Mary, Hector M. and...

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