Location: Tacoma Washington

Beam, Delilah Lillian Siegler Mrs.

Baker City, Oregon Lillian S. Beam, 83, a longtime Baker City resident, died July 13, 2004, at St. Elizabeth Health Care Center. Her funeral will be at 10 a.m. Friday at Gray’s West & Co., 1500 Dewey Ave. The Rev. Ed Niswender of the Calvary Baptist Church will officiate. Vault interment will be at Mount Hope Cemetery. Visitations will be until 8 o’clock tonight at Gray’s West & Co. She was born Delilah Lillian Siegler on Sept. 1, 1920, at Kulm, N.D., to John and Katherina Weisser Siegler. After finishing her schooling, she traveled West with her sister, Viola, to Tacoma, Wash., where they both went to work at Madigan Army Hospital. It was there she met and married Robert “Bob” Beam in November of 1946. They made their home at Olympia, Wash., until Bob was discharged from the service. At that time they moved to Unity where Bob’s parents, Ralph and Rose, lived. They later moved to Mount Vernon and John Day, but eventually made Baker City their home. Together they had four children, Tom, Susan, John and Mike. After 26 years of marriage they divorced, but they always stayed close. Bob died in 1990. Lillian spent most of her life as a devoted homemaker, wife and mother. You could always count on a good meal at her home. After the children got older, Lillian went to work...

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Wiester, Emily Irene Street Mrs. – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Emily Irene Wiester, 88, of Issaquah, Wash., a former Baker City resident, died Feb. 24, 2003, at her home. A funeral Mass will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Friday at St. Madeleine Sophie Roman Catholic Church in Bellevue, Wash. Irene was born on Jan. 26, 1915, in Prineville to Mary and Edward Street. Her parents moved to California shortly after she was born. Irene attended the University of Washington at Seattle as a freshman. There she met Harold Wiester. After graduation from the University of California, Berkeley, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in dietetics, she returned to the Northwest in 1938 as a dietetic intern at St. Joseph’s hospital in Tacoma. Subsequently she worked at Doctor’s Hospital in Seattle. Harold and Irene were married in 1939 and had three children while they lived at Edmonds, Wash. They set out on a farming adventure to Baker City in 1951. Irene worked as a caseworker for the Department of Human Services in Baker City for 22 years before she and Harold retired. They then moved to Lake Havasu, Ariz., where they enjoyed the sun and many rounds of golf. In order to be closer to family, Irene and Harold moved back to the Seattle area in 1995. Irene was a lifelong member of the Catholic Church. She belonged to the American Dietetics Association and the Baker and...

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Biography of Edward P. Cadwell

EDWARD P. CADWELL. – This substantial capitalist of Washington, and leading member of the legal profession of Tacoma, was born in Independence, Iowa, December 23, 1855, and was the son of Carlos C. and Emily E. (Ross) Cadwell, his mother having been a sister of Chief Justice Ross of Vermont. He resided in his native town, where he attended a public school, and in his seventeenth year entered the Iowa State Agricultural College, graduating as civil engineer in 1875. Returning home, he became principal for one year of the grammar department of the high school at Independence. Upon the completion of this task, he entered Simpson’s Law College of Des Moines, Iowa, form which he graduated in1877. On receiving his degree, he located in Logan, Iowa, and began the practice of his profession. Two years later he removed to Council Bluffs, where he built up a large business. Learning of the possibilities of the greater West, he came in 1885 to Washington, locating at Tacoma, where he opened an office and invested largely in real estate, from which he has reaped a golden harvest. In 1887 Mr. Cadwell for a time made Ellensburgh his home, and while there purchased a large amount of valuable real estate, among which was the well-known Johnson Hotel, a large three-story frame building. In 1888 he built as an addition a beautiful three-story brick,...

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Biography of A. C. Campbell

A.C. CAMPBELL. – The respect Mr. Campbell commands in his community as a man of honesty and integrity, and as one who has acquired a very enviable competency by hard knocks and straightforward dealings, reminds one of Longfellow’s famous blacksmith; but, although Mr. Campbell has for years upon years listened to the “measured beat and slow’ of his hammer on the anvil, he no longer appears with leathern apron and bare, brown arms, because he is now settled down in a comfortable home, and in the midst of his loving family living happily by other and less arduous pursuits than blacksmithing. He an contemplate with pleasure the means which he has accomplished by industry and determination. He is one of the pioneers of the county, and as such should not be passed over with a mere casual mention. If there is any one class of men more than another entitled to the admiration of everyone, it is that known as the “early pioneers.” They were men possessed of more character, hardihoood and genuine bravery than any other class of men living, and possessed a versatility which seemed to fit them particularly for the life of a pioneer, – to subdue and have dominion. It by no means follows that all men who came to the coast in “early days” were pioneers of this stamp. “Those were the times that...

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Biography of Nelson Bennett

NELSON BENNETT. – Though Toronto, Canada, must be accredited as the birthplace of the distinguished personage whose name heads this brief sketch of a most active, useful and busy life, yet were his parentage and ancestry thoroughly American. On the paternal side the Bennetts were natives of Virginia, three generations back; and his mother was of the ancient and time-honored family of the Spragues of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. He was born October 14,1843; and his father died when he was seven years of age, leaving a widow and six children. The family resided upon a farm; and Nelson was afforded the opportunity of acquiring a good rudimentary education in the grammar schools near Toronto. The custom was to work on the farm six months, and go to school the remainder of the year. This was continued until his fourteenth year. In his seventeenth year he left Toronto, and came to Orleans county, New York, the old home of the family, where he attended school for one year. During much of his first year in New York, he was sick from the effects of a singular but severe accident. He was riding horseback through the timber, his horse being on a lope, when he came to a limb extending across the road, which he thought he could avoid by ducking his head. The limb,, however, so caught his body,...

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Biography of Sidney S. Benton

SIDNEY S. BENTON. – This pioneer of Illinois, California and Washington is one of those facile, multiplex characters that give to our Western life its buoyancy. He was born in the first-named State in 1838, while Chicago was yet in her swamps, and his father was at that city in 1831, when it was a mere Indian trading post, and also at Galena, the home of the Grants, in 1832. His father came out to California with ox-teams amid Indians, and over the usual sage-brush plains, and the iron-stone rocks in 1849. He mined on Feather river in Yuba county, and in 1852 went to Siskiyou county, where he followed mining and merchandising. Sidney arrived in 1856 via Panama at Yreka, and mined near that city and in Scott’s valley until 1861. In that year he went to Nevada, working on the Comstock; for six years he was underground foreman of the Savage mine, making money and losing it. In Siskiyou county and Surprise valley, and at Dixon in Solano county, California, he engaged again in business. At the latter place, in 1863, he met an old acquaintance from Wisconsin, Miss Mattie E. Bowmer. She and her brother had come the year before from the East in the company which had been attacked on the Upper Snake river by Indians, who killed twenty-eight of the party. Some fifteen years...

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Biography of Henry Drum

HENRY DRUM. – Among the progressive, intelligent and enterprising business men who are lending their energy and strength to the constant and rapid development of the great resources of the State of Washington, no name stands higher, or is more widely known and deservedly popular, than that of Henry Drum. No more conspicuous example of the results of careful attention to business, probity of character and steadfastness of purpose, can be cited than the brilliant career of Tacoma’s ex-mayor. It is to this class of young, keen and active workers that the great Northwest is to-day indebted for its magnificent prosperity and unparalleled growth. Always foremost in every enterprise for the upbuilding of the city and territory at large, he has achieved a name and reputation that many men of the allotted three score years and ten might well feel proud of. Although but thirty-two years of age, no name is better known in Western Washington than that of the young senator from Pierce county. The same strength of purpose and untiring pursuit of objects aimed at having characterized him from boyhood to the mature man; and the earnestness of youth has been combined with the calm judgement of riper years to create the pushing but prudent business man and careful financier and adviser. Mr. Drum was born in the town of Girard, Macoupin county, Illinois, on November 21,...

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Biography of Hiram Doncaster

HIRAM DONCASTER. – No one seems to operate so much in the capacity of a creator as the shipbuilder. The products of his brain and hand have a life of their own, are given a name, and have their own personality. Shipbuilding on the Sound is, moreover, an important business; and the masters of this craft are men of distinction. One of these is the man whose name appears at the head of this sketch. He was born in Nova Scotia in 1838, and first came to this coast via Panama in the year 1856, mining in Plumas county two years, and pushing out with the stampede to the Frazer river mines in 1858, fighting Indians more or less the whole distance. After eleven years on the coast, he went back to the East on a visit of three months, and returning began work at his trade, or art, becoming a prolific builder of crafts of all kinds. He worked in San Francisco at the shipyards of Middlemas & Bool, Nova Scotians. At Port Ludlow, Washington Territory, he built the bark Forest Queen. At the mouth of the Umpqua he built the little steamer Swan, which made the first and only and probably last trip to Roseburg, on the violent Umpqua river. In San Francisco again he built the Steamer Enterprise, considered at the time the finest and fastest...

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Biography of Rev. John F. Devore, D. D.

REV. JOHN F. DEVORE, D.D. – Doctor Devore was a native of Kentucky, being born near Lexington, December 7, 1817. He was of French descent, as the name indicates, and owed very much to the pious example of religious parents, who urged him with their last words to be “faithful to his God.” The “Life of Bramwell” fell into his hands at an early date, was read with great relish, and had much to do in molding the shape of his after life. Entering the ministry, he joined the Rock river conference in 1842, Bishop Roberts presiding. He was ordained deacon at Milwaukee in 1844 by Bishop Morris, and elder at Galena, Illinois, in 1846 by Bishop Hamline. In May, 1853, he was transferred to the Oregon conference by Bishop Waugh, and arrived with his family at Steilacoom, Washington Territory, the latter part of August in that year, and entered at once upon his singularly interesting and successful career of ministerial labor on this coast, embracing a period of thirty-six eventful years. While in the Oregon conference, Doctor Devore’s appointments were as follows: Steilacoom two years, 1853-55; Olympia one year, 1855-56; presiding elder Puget Sound district three years, 1856-59; Vancouver two years, 1859-61; The Dalles two years, 1861-63; East Tualitan two years, 1863-65; Milwaukee one year, 1865-66; presiding elder Portland district four years, 1870-74; Vancouver two years, 1874-76; Albany...

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Biography of Francis H. Cook

FRANCIS H. COOK, – Mr. Cook was born in Marietta, Ohio, in 1851. He went with his parents to Iowa at the age of twelve. His father was a farmer, and have his attention to agriculture and to sawmilling; but it was decided to make a printer of the boy. He was accordingly apprenticed to work at the cases in the office of the Harrison County Union, a paper owned and edited by Judge Henry Ford, who was also sitting on the bench of the northwest district of Iowa. The journal changed proprietors quite frequently, young Cook remaining through the two administrations succeeding Judge Ford’s; but, at the next call for a change, he and another ambitious young man embraced the opportunity to buy the Union themselves, conducting it a year and a half. But feeling the need of a more complete intellectual equipment, the young journalist sold out his share and attended Iowa State University. His studies there were cut short at the end of the second year by the failure of the man to whom he had sold, making his notes worthless. He had, however, fifteen dollars, earned at Iowa City; and with this for capital he set forth at the age of nineteen to see the world. His printer’s trade gave him employment. There is never so care-free a traveler as the compositor; and young cook...

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Biography of William H. Fife

WILLIAM H. FIFE. – This gentleman is a native of Otonabee, Petersburg county, Ontario, and is the third child of William and Mary Beckett Fife. He was born on the first of October, 1833. His father was a native of Kincardine, and came to Canada in 1820, following farming in that country. His mother was born January 20, 1811, in Ayrshire, Scotland, and came with her parents to Canada about 1820, and is still living with her youngest son on the old homestead in Petersburg county. Our subject resided on his father’s farm until he became sixteen years of age, and then went to Keen, Ontario, where he entered a general merchandise store as an apprentice, serving three years. He then clerked for John Ross & Co. in Port Hope for a year, and then entered into business for himself in Norwood, Ontario. He afterwards sold out and moved West, and, on hearing of the great gold excitement of the Caribou mines in 1862, came West to British Columbia via New York and the Isthumus of Panama. He arrived at the Caribou mines in June, 1862, and there followed mining for three years, after which he returned to Canada. After a short time he removed to Michigan, locating at the town of Vassar, where he engaged in the mercantile, hotel and lumber business for five years, after which he...

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Biography of Peter Dewar Forbes

PETER DEWAR FORBES. – In the gentleman whose name heads this brief memoir, and whose portrait appears in this history, we have one of the very earliest settlers of Tacoma, as well as one of her prominent business men and capitalists. Mr. Forbes was born in St. Johns, New Brunswick, February 18,1845, and is the son of William and Jesie Dewar Forbes. After his school days were passed, Peter learned the trade of a carpenter and shipbuilder, becoming a master mechanic. In 1868 he came to the United States, locating in Minneapolis, where he became a well-known architect and builder, until 1873. In that year he desired to seek a milder climate, and chose Washington Territory as the most desirable location, making his first residence in Seattle and engaging in his former business. His matured ability soon attracted the notice of the officers in the Northern Pacific Railroad, then entering the territory. In April, 1873, he accepted employment as superintendent of depot and bridge construction, and in this capacity built all the depots, roundhouses and machine shops form Land Pend d’Oreille to Tacoma, and from Kalama to the latter place. On his arrival at the present site of the beautiful city of Tacoma, there was but one building in the place; and in 1874 Mr. Forbes built the headquarters building for the company, then standing where the magnificent new...

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Biography of Clinton P. Ferry

CLINTON P. FERRY. – Clinton P. Ferry was born at Fort Wayne, Indiana, May 24, 1836. Having lost his father, an uncle became his guardian to a great extent. At the age of seven years he removed to Indianapolis, where he attended a preparatory school and business college. For a short time, he engaged in learning the art of printing, and devoted his seventeenth and eighteenth years as a telegraph operator. He was a nephew of W.G.& G.W. Ewing, a firm then largely interested in trading posts on the then Western frontier of the United States. They had branches at Chicago, St. Louis, green Bay and Council Bluffs which gave employment to a large number of trappers and voyageurs. Gabriel Franchere, who had been a clerk in the employ of John Jacob Astor in his Pacific Fur Company enterprise, and who accompanied the expedition to the mouth of the Columbia river and remained on duty until Astor was betrayed by his North West Company partners, who sold out to that company, made his name famous by the fascinating narrative of that ill-fated expedition. He was an agent of Ferry’s uncle, G.W. Ewing. Young Ferry was bent on “going West.” He desired to travel and seek adventure; and Franchere suggested Puget Sound as a future field, in which advice the uncle concurred. That uncle upon his leaving told young Ferry...

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Biography of Hon. Dolphes Brice Hannah

HON. DOLPHES BRICE HANNAH. – This gentleman is the son of Brice and Celia Tade Hannah, and was born in Gallatin county, Illinois, October 11, 1822. His father, who was a substantial business man engaged in trade and forwarding, died in the spring of 1823, leaving a wife and two children, one boy and one girl. He left considerable estate, consisting of personal property. John McLaughlin and the widow were appointed to administer the estate; and, as usual, McLaughlin did the work, pocketed the entire proceeds of the estate, and then left for parts unknown. About two years after the death of young Hannah’s father, his mother married Silas Farley, a flatboatman and farmer, by whom she had five children, three boys and two girls. They moved to White county and settled on the Big Wabash river. In the winter of 1833-34 Farley died, leaving a wife and seven children. While living with his step-father, young Hannah attended school two terms, one kept by a man by the name of Blackwell, a severe disciplinarian, the other named Buckalew, whom he remembers as an elegant and kindly man. The last expedition of his stepfather on the river proved disastrous, all of his estate being swept away, leaving his wife and seven children without means. In the spring of 1834 the widow with her family left their former home and rented...

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Biography of Hon. Theodore L. Stiles

HON. THEODORE L. STILES. – Honorable Theodore L. Stiles was born at Medway, Clarke county, Ohio, July 12, 1848, and was the only child of Daniel J. and Marie S. Stiles. His mother’s maiden name was Lamme; and she, too, was a native of the same county as her son. Mr. Stiles’ father was born of German and English parents, in Danplin county, Pennsylvania. His mother’s family were emigrants from Virginia in 1809. Until the age of sixteen, he remained at his birthplace, which was a small interior farming village. But, his mother having died in 1863, his father removed in 1865 to Indianapolis, Indiana, where he entered into mercantile business; and the young man was for a few months an assistant of his father’s firm. But although his father had not had the advantages of education, he was one of those who to the keenest degree realized its future importance to the young; and he, therefore, at great sacrifice to himself, opened to his son the use of his lifetime earnings. The young man was fairly prepared for study, and chose at first to enter the Ohio University at Athens. There he spent two years, laying the foundation for admission to Amherst College, at Amherst, Massachusetts, where he entered as freshman September 10, 1867. After the usual college course of four years, he graduated in 1871, and at...

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