Location: Sumner County TN

Governor Houston at His Trading Post on the Verdigris

In February, 1828, the vanguard of Creek immigrants arrived at the Creek Agency on the Verdigris, in charge of Colonel Brearley, and they and the following members of the McIntosh party were located on a section of land that the Government promised in the treaty of 1826 to purchase for them. By the treaty of May 6, 1828, the Government assigned the Cherokee a great tract of land, to which they at once began to remove from their homes in Arkansas. The movement had been under way for some months when there appeared among the Indians the remarkable figure of Samuel Houston. The biographers of Houston have told the world next to nothing of his sojourn of three or four years in the Indian country, an interesting period when he was changing the entire course of his life and preparing for the part he was to play in the drama of Texas.

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Slave Narrative of Harriet Cheatam

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Harriet Cheatam Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Gallatin, Tennessee Date of Birth: December 25, 1843 Age: 94 Place of Residence: 816 Darnell Street Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #8 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. HARRIET CHEATAM-EX-SLAVE 816 Darnell Street Interviewer’s Comment Incidents in the life of Mrs. Cheatam as she told them to me. Interview “I was born, in 1843, in Gallatin, Tennessee, 94 years ago this coming (1937) Christmas day.” “Our master, Martin Henley, a farmer, was hard on us slaves, but we were happy in spite of our lack.” “When I was a child, I didn’t have it as hard as some of the children in the quarters. I always stayed in the “big house,” slept on the floor, right near the fireplace, with one quilt for my bed and one quilt to cover me. Then when I growed up, I was in the quarters.” “After the Civil war, I went to Ohio to cook for General Payne. We had a nice life in the general’s house.” “I remember one night, way back before the Civil war, we wanted a goose. I went out to steal one as that was the only way we slaves would have one. I crept very quiet-like, put my hand in where they was and grabbed, and what do you suppose...

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Slave Narrative of Joseph William Carter

Interviewer: Lauana Creel Person Interviewed: Joseph William Carter Location: Evansville, Indiana Age: 100+ Ex-Slave Stories 5th District Vandenburgh County Lauana Creel SLAVE STORY JOSEPH WILLIAM CARTER This information was gained through an interview with Joseph William Carter and several of his daughters. The data was cheerfully given to the writer. Joseph William Carter has lived a long and, he declares, a happy life, although he was born and reared in bondage. His pleasing personality has always made his lot an easy one and his yoke seemed easy to wear. Joseph William Carter was born prior to the year 1836. His mother, Malvina Gardner was a slave in the home of Mr. Gardner until a man named D.B. Smith saw her and noticing the physical perfection of the child at once purchased her from her master. Malvina was agrieved at being compelled to leave her old home, and her lovely young mistress. Puss Gardner was fond of the little mullato girl and had taught her to be a useful member of the Gardner family; however, she was sold to Mr. Smith and was compelled to accompany him to his home. Both the Gardner and Smith families lived near Gallatin, Tennessee, in Sumner County. The Smith plantation was situated on the Cumberland River and commanded a beautiful view of river and valley acres but Malvina was very unhappy. She did not...

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Slave Narrative of Scott Martin

Person Interviewed: Scott Martin Location: Tennessee Place of Birth: Sumner County TN Age: 90 Place of Residence: 438 Fifth Ave., No. “I’se 90 y’ars ole and wuz bawn in slavery in Sumner County, Tennessee and I b’long to Marster Dr. Madison Martin an’ mah Misses Mary. And I wuk’d wid de stock an’ wuz de houseman.” “I hab neber been in any truble, neber ‘rested en neber bin in jail. I knows how ter behave, but de young peeples ob terday ain’ dun rite en dey don’ ‘mounts ter much. Dar am a few dat am all rite. In de ole days dey wer’ bettuh dan dey ez terday. De white and black ougher not ma’rie.” “I has voted two times, but I disremembers who I voted fer. Neber hadney frens in office en I nebr met any of de Klu Klux men. I didn’ go out much en I neber wuz kotched w’en I did git out. I heered lots ’bout nigger uprisin’ but dey wuz away off.” “I b’long ter de Missionary Baptist chuch an’ I useter preach in mah chuch ‘ouse en udders w’en called. Once a y’ar I wud be at de Cumberland Riber wha’f en’ baptiz’ culled peeples all da’. We useter hab camp meetin’ in de ole days en hab good things ter eat en I would preach all day. I went ter...

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Slave Narrative of Alice Douglass

Person Interviewed: Alice Douglass Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Sumner County, Tennessee Date of Birth: December 22, 1860 Age: 73 I was born December 22, 1880 in Summer County, Tennessee. My mother, I mean mammy, ’cause what did we know ’bout mother and mama. Master and Mistress made dey chillun call all nigger women. “Black Harmy.” Jest as I was saying my mammy was named Millie Elkins and my pappy was named Isaac Garrett. My sisters and brothers was Frank, Susie and Mollie. They is all in Nashville, Tennessee right now. They lived in log houses. I ‘member my grandpappy and when he died. I allus slept in the Big House in a cradle wid white babies. We all the time wore cotton dresses and we weaved our own cloth. The boys jest wore shirts. Some wore shoes, and I sho’ did. I kin see ’em now as they measured my feets to git my shoes. We had doctors to wait on us iffen we got sick and ailing. We wore asafedida to keep all diseases offen us. When a nigger man got ready to marry, he go and tell his master that they was a woman on sech and sech a farm that he’d lak to have. Iffen master give his resent, then he go and ask her master and iffen he say yes, well, they...

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Biograpy Sketch of James H. Kitching

James H. Kitching, a prosperous farmer and stock dealer of Alexandria, was born May 28, 1840, in Smith County. He is the fourth of fourteen children of Thomas and Mary (Davis) Kitching. The father was born in Smith County in 1809, a son of James Kitchen who was a native of North Carolina. He immigrated to Tennessee at an early date stopping first at the top of Bledsoe’s Lick, Sumner County, afterward located in Smith County, near the head of Kitching Creek, which was named for him. He was one of the first settlers in that section where his life was passed. Thomas was reared in his native county, where he married about 1831. He is a substantial farmer, well and favorably known. His wife was born in North Carolina about five years later than her husband. Both are faithful members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. They raised a large and intelligent family; all lived to maturity. There are now three sons and four daughters. The subject of this sketch was educated in the common schools. In September 1862, he enlisted in the United States Army, in Company B, Fifth Tennessee Cavalry. He took part in the battle of Stone River and many skirmishes. In August, 1863, he was discharged on account of disability, but in the fall of 1864 enlisted in Company G, Fourth Tennessee Mounted Infantry,...

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Biography of Rev. Ira W. King

Rev. Ira W. King, pastor of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and a prominent citizen of Alexandria, was born December 3, 1819, in North Carolina. He is the fourth of eight children born to Prof. Tho. H. And Ann (Harris) King. The father was a native of Virginia, born about 1790, of Scotch-Irish descent, a son of Henry King, also a native of Virginia. Tho. H. was reared and liberally educated in his native State. He went to Rockingham County, N. C., when a young man, where he married about 1810. In 1820 he moved to Williamson County, Tenn., and in 1832 located in Smith County. A few years prior to his death he went to Jackson County. He died in 1865. Many years of his early life were spent as a schoolteacher in North Carolina and Tennessee. He served as deputy sheriff and captain of militia for several years. The latter portion of his life was devoted to agricultural pursuits. His wife was born in North Carolina about the same year of his birth and died in 1873, a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Our subject was mostly educated at Castalian Springs, Sumner County, and at Lebanon, where he married in June 1843, Miss Deborah, daughter of Jackson N. and Elizabeth (Whitson) Brown. Of the ten children born to this union, four are living: Dr. Robt. W., of...

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Sumner County, Tennessee Cemetery Transcriptions

Tennessee Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Tennessee county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Cemeteries (hosted at Sumner County, Tennessee Tombstone Transcription Project) Alden Cemetery Anderson Cemetery aka Collier Cemetery Cemetery Index Baker-Parson Cemetery Nathan Barnes Tombstone Inscription Barry Family Graveyard Jim Bates Tombstone Inscription Beech Church Graveyard aka Old Beech Church Cemetery Bethpage Cemetery Bledsoe Academy Cemetery aka Bledsoe Cemetery Blackemore Tombstone Inscriptions Bloodworth-Parker Family Graveyard aka Bloodworth Cemetery Brackentown Cemetery Bradley Family Graveyard aka Sulphura Cemetery Rev. Brown Tombstone Inscription Brush Cemetery Burke Cemetery Bush’s Chapel Church of Christ Cemetery Bush Family Graveyard Cage Family Graveyard Clendening Cemetery Conger Family Graveyard aka Brigance Cemetery Corinth Cemetery Cotton Family Graveyard Creasy Cemetery William Crumby Tombstone Cryer Family Graveyard Dorris Cemetery Douglass Cemetery Douglass Family Graveyard Dunn Family Graveyard Durham Cemetery Edwards Graveyard Edwards-Love Graveyard Elliot Family Graveyard Forest Chapel Cemetery Fort Cemetery Furgerson Family Graveyard Gallatin City Cemetery Gallatin City Cemetery Unmarked Graves Gallatin City Cemetery Sexton Records Gardner Cemetery Gibson Cemetery Glover Family Graveyard Goad Cemetery Gourley-Soper Cemetery Graves Cemetery Green-Freeman Family Graveyard Hall-Haynes Family Graveyard Hamilton-Malone Family Graveyard Harris Cemetery Hassell Cemetery Hillcrest at White House Historic Sherron Cemetery Hodges Cemetery Jackson Cemetery Jameson Cemetery Jones Cemetery Joyner...

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Biography of A. T. Robertson, M. D.

A. T. Robertson, M. D., physician and surgeon, dealer in drugs, medicines, etc., Ashmore; was born in Sumner Co., Tenn., June 30, 1834; his father, Rev. John H. Robertson, was born in Virginia, and removed to Tennessee with his parents when but a boy; in 1829, he came to Coles Co., and engaged in teaching school near the present city of Charleston; his name appears on the records as the second person to whom letters of administration were granted in Coles Co.; in 1832, he returned to Tennessee, where he was ordained a minister of the M. E. Church, and where he married Miss Sarah Carr, of Sumner Co.; about 1838, he removed to Camden Co., Mo., and is now a prominent and well-to-do farmer of Laclede Co., in that State. Dr. Robertson, at the age of 21, engaged in teaching in Choctaw Nation, pursuing his medical studies in the mean time; this he continued two years; in 1858, he attended his first course of lectures in the medical department of the State University at Nashville, Tenn.; he then located in Carroll Co., Ark., and began practice; during the winter of 1860-61, he attended lectures in the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, where he graduated and received his degree in the spring of 1861; returning to Arkansas, he practiced medicine there till 1864, and then removed to Ashmore; after teaching...

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