Location: Shelby County KY

Biographical Sketch of John McGhee

John McGhee, a native of Ireland, married Margaret Adams, who was born in England. They settled in Shelby County, Ky., where they had Lynch, Emily, Margaret, James, Washington, Nancy, and Rice. Lynch was a physician. Re-married Margaret Shackelford, and settled in Louisville, Ky., but removed to St. Louis, Mo., in 1838. Washington married Julia Sibley, of Kentucky, and died in 1828, leaving a widow and four children Mary H., Robert L., Harriet, and Epsey. Mrs. MeGhee and her children settled in Montgomery County, Mo., in 1841, and she is still living, in her 76th...

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Biographical Sketch of Richard Jones

Richard Jones, who was born in England, married a Miss Love, and settled in Botetourt Co., Va. He was a member of the Baptist Church, but had to give a hogshead of tobacco every year for the support of the Episcopal Church. The names of his children were William, John, and Silas. William married Elizabeth Metcalf, and settled first in Shelby Co., Ky., from whence he removed to Missouri and settled on Darst’s Bottom, St. Charles County, in 1818. In 1820 he removed to Callaway County, and built a horse-mill, under the shed of which the Baptists held religious services for a number of years. The mill was kept by his son, William M., who afterward became a Baptist preacher, and is now a merchant at Montgomery City. William Jones’ children were Jane, Richard, Elizabeth L., Susan, William M., Minerva, Maria, Martha, and Narcissa. Jane married Robert Saylor. Richard married Unicia Davis. He afterward died of consumption, and the day before his death he was taken to the creek, on his bed, placed in a rocking chair, and baptized, chair and all, by Jabez Ham. Elizabeth L. Jones married William McCormack. William M. married Elizabeth Jones, and they had twelve children, one of whom, Judge Robert W. Jones, has been Judge of the Probate Court of Montgomery County, and is now editor of the Standard at Montgomery City. Minerva...

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Biographical Sketch of Henry Lawson

Henry Lawson, of Shelby Co., Ky., married Rebecca Lewis, by whom he had Henry, James, Joseph, William, John, Cynthia A., Mary, Laura, Rebecca, and Nancy. Mr. Lawson settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1822. He and his wife were present at the organization of Macedonia Church, on Cuivre, of which they became...

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Biography of Mrs. Caroline (Watson) Dickinson

Mrs. Caroline (Watson) Dickinson, the widow of William R. Dickinson, is the daughter of Daniel and Rowena (Bartlett) Watson. Her father was born in North Carolina in 1797 and the mother in Missouri in 1802, where they married and lived until 1820, when they crossed over to Fulton County, Kentucky, and lived there until they died. They had eight children, two boys and six girls. Her mother was a devout Methodist; her father, an energetic farmer, and a democrat, and died in 1865; the mother died in 1869. Mrs. Dickinson was born April 6, 1823, being the first child born in Madrid Bend, Kentucky She had fine educational advantages, and spent two years under Mrs.Tevis, the principal of “Science Hill,” at Shelbyville, Kentucky, for a great many years the largest and best female college in the South. In 1843 she married William R. Dickinson, a native of Missouri. He was a graduate of Cape Girardeau College, of Missouri. He taught school for some time, and his wife was a pupil of his. He then went into the mercantile business at Vicksburg, Mississippi, but, the firm failing, he took his remnant of the goods, put them on a steamboat, and, going up the river, landed at Mr. Watson’s, where, meeting his old pupil, Miss Caroline Watson, again, their friendship was renewed, and before He left they were married. Soon after...

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Biography of James I. Crutcher

One to whom has been entrusted important public service and over whose record there falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil, is James I. Crutcher, of Boise. President Cleveland recognized his eminent qualifications for responsible duties when he appointed him United States marshal for Idaho, in which position he served for four years and two months, in a manner above suspicion. His unbending integrity of character, his fearlessness in the discharge of duty and his appreciation of the responsibilities that rested upon him were such as to make him a most acceptable incumbent of that office, and his worth then, as now, was widely acknowledged. A native of Kentucky, Mr. Crutcher was born in Shelby County, on the 31st of December 1835. His ancestors were early settlers of Virginia and North Carolina, and members of the family became pioneers in the development of Kentucky. It was in that state that Thomas M. Crutcher, father of our subject, was born, his natal clay being in 1810. He wedded Miss Mary Ann Edwards, a native of Woodford County, Kentucky, who also belonged to a family of equally early settlement in the south. Her father was James Edwards, a pioneer widely and favorably known in Kentucky. Thomas M. Crutcher was an enterprising farmer, and through the capable management of his agricultural interests won a comfortable competence. He held membership in...

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Biographical Sketch of Mordecai Morgan

Mordecai Morgan, of Shelby County, Kentucky, married Catharine Turner, and settled in (now) Warren County, Missouri, in 1814. He was a noted pioneer of that County, and the first County Court was held in his house. His children were Malinda, Hiram, Rachel, Maranda, Matilda, Missouri, Martha, and Minerva. Malinda married James Bryan, a son of David Bryan. Hiram was a ranger in Nathan Boone’s company. He died of cholera, at Rock Island, in 1832. Rachel married Samuel Dougherty, of Warren County. Alaranda married Louisa Harper, of Lincoln County. Matilda married Levi Hinds, of Tennessee, who settled in Warren County. Missouri ‘died single. Martha married William Harper, who is at present a banker in Mexico, Missouri. Minerva married Edward Pleasants, of Virginia, who settled in Warren County, Missouri, in...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles Ellis

Charles Ellis, of Virginia, married his cousin, Nancy Ellis, and they had Thomas, Polly, Stephen, Elizabeth, Nancy, Charles, Joseph, Martha, James M., and Susan. Mr. Ellis removed from Richmond, Va., to Shelby Co., Ky., in 1815. Stephen married Mary Young, of Kentucky, and settled in Warren Co., Mo., in 1826. In 1847 he removed to St. Charles County, where he died. His children were James, Charles, Nancy, Sarah C., Martha F., Mary H., and William T. Joseph Ellis was married twice; first, to Nancy Netherton, by whom he had Henry C., Mildred C., Charles M., Ann E., Lucy B., Paulina, Joseph, Stephen E., John G., William S., and Martha L. After the death of his first wife Mr. Ellis married the widow of Benjamin Pitts, whose maiden name was Susan R. Simms. Martha Ellis married Thomas Moffitt, of Virginia, who settled in St. Charles Co., Mo., in 1830. Elizabeth married Edward R. Kelso, who settled in St. Charles Co., Mo., in 1831. Then most of their children moved to...

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Biography of Robert Alexander Long

Robert Alexander Long. It is perhaps not generally known that the humble beginnings of the great Long-Bell Lumber Company was made in Kansas. The home of the corporation for a number of years has been in Kansas City, Missouri, where the splendid R. A. Long office building, one of the finest and most modern structures of its kind in the Middle West, furnishes the headquarters for the business whose operations are widespread all over the Southwest. But for forty years the retail business of the concern has been largely in Kansas and Kansas may properly claim Robert A. Long as one of its greatest business executives. On April 30, 1875, a carload of lumber was unloaded at the little town of Columbus, in Cherokee County, Kansas. It was consigned to the firm of R. A. Long & Company. This firm consisted of Robert A. Long, Victor B. Bell and Robert White. The senior member of the firm was twenty-four years of age and his partners had not yet reached their majority. The members of the firm had neither surplus capital nor bank accounts. However, Mr. Bell’s father was president of the Kansas City Savings Bank and Mr. White’s father its cashier. The bank thus gave them the best of recommendations and when cash was required loaned it to them on open account. In the original yard at Columbus, R....

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Biography of Thomas K. Stout

Thomas K. Stout, who has been actively identified with merchandising interests in Bartlesville during the past sixteen years, has since 1919 been the proprietor of Stout’s Specialty Shop at No. 217 East Third street and in this connection enjoys an extensive and high-class patronage. He was born in Shelbyville, Shelby County, Kentucky, on the 4th of January, 1875, his parents being J. K. and Sarah L. (McCallister) Stout, the latter also a native of Kentucky. J. K. Stout removed with his family to St. Clair County, Missouri, in 1885 and throughout the remainder of his active business career successfully devoted his attention to mercantile pursuits in Appleton City. Both he and his wife are deceased. Thomas K. Stout was a lad of ten years when he accompanied his parents to Missouri and a young man of thirty when he came to Bartlesville, Oklahoma, in 1905. Here he associated himself with L. Brin, proprietor of the Boston Store, a general dry goods and ready-to-wear establishment, forming a corporation known as the L. Brin Company, of which he became the vice president. In 1919 Mr. Stout disposed of his interest in the enterprise and opened Stout’s Specialty Shop, of which he has remained the sole proprietor, carrying a very fine line of ladies’ ready-to-wear apparel and drawing an exclusive patronage from the town and surrounding country. His trademark, SSS, has become...

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Biography of Joseph R. Smith

Joseph R. Smith. The record of continuous service in the office of probate judge in Kansas is held by Joseph B. Smith, of Iola. The people of Allen County first elected Mr. Smith to handle the delicate responsibilities of the probate office in 1894. The term is for two years. Every succeeding two years the people have had an opportunity to express their judgment of Judge Smith’s administration, and every time, apparently regardless of political party fortunes or other considerations, his ability and varied qualifications have received the stamp of approval and in 1916 he was re-elected for the eleventh consecutive term. Judge Smith had known Kansas more or less intimately for nearly half a century, and had been a permanent resident of the state for thirty-seven years. His is an interesting family record. He was born in Springfield in Sangamon County, Illinois, November 1, 1853. His father was a prominent man in that section of Illinois and filled offices under the great Abraham Lincoln, whom he knew personally. This branch of the Smith family came out of England and were early settlers in Virginia. Judge Smith’s grandfather was George M. Smith, who was born in Culpeper County, Virginia, April 23, 1785. When he was a child his parents took him into Henry County, Kentucky. In Shelby County of that state on August 14, 1810, he married Matilda Dowdall,...

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Hastings, Sarah Ann Martin – Obituary

Mrs. Sarah Ann Hastings, 81, resident of Walla Walla for several years, died at her home, 9 North Spokane Street, Wednesday evening [July 1] following six months of failing health. Mrs. Hastings was the widow of William Hastings who died here in December of 1934. She was born July 16, 1855 in Shelby County, Kentucky, and is survived by several nieces and nephews in Kentucky. She was a member of the White Temple Baptist Church. Funeral arrangements are being made for Saturday morning. Walla Walla Union, July 2, 1936 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Biographical Sketch of Eugene B. Lawson

The many and varied business enterprises with which Eugene B. Lawson is connected establishes his position as a prominent figure in connection with the commercial and financial development of the state. A native of Kentucky, he was born in Shelbyville, May 27, 1871, and was a young man of twenty-five years when in 1896 he came to the Indian Territory, settling at Nowata. In the fall of the year 1896 he was admitted to the Oklahoma bar and entered upon the active work of his profession, but for the past twelve years has given no time to law practice. He is now concentrating his entire time and attention upon his oil interests, in the oil fields of both Texas and Oklahoma. He is one of the directors and was one of the founders of the First National Bank of Nowata. His business affairs, now extensive and important, have always constituted an element in the growth and progress of the state, as well as in the up-building of his own fortunes. In 1891 Mr. Lawson married Miss Roberta Campbell, a daughter of J. E. Campbell, president of the First National Bank of Nowata. Mr. and Mrs. Lawson have one child, Edward Campbell Lawson, born October 7, 1905, who is now attending school at the Kemper Military School, Boonville, Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Lawson have taken the keenest interest in the...

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Biography of Thomas M. Walker

Thomas M. Walker became a resident of Kansas in 1879. He was one of the pioneer merchants at Alton in Osborne County, but from that county his range of interests had become widely extended in recent years. He is now a resident of Atchison, where he had lived since 1901, and is one of the leading business men and bankers in the eastern part of the state. Mr. Walker was born on a farm in Owen County, Kentucky, August 15, 1846. His family became identified with Kentucky when it was a new western state. His grandfather, William B. Walker, was born in England and came to this country with an older brother. In Kentucky he located at Lexington, and became superintendent of the cloth manufacturing plant in which Henry Clay was financially interested. He had learned the trade of weaver at Manchester, England. Thomas M. Walker was the fifth in a family of seven children born to Delville and Lucinda (Sparks) Walker, both of whom were natives of Kentucky. Delville Walker was a prosperous farmer. In the issues which grew out of slavery he took a firm stand on the side of abolition and became one of the early members of the republican party. His son, James, fought in the Union army with the Ninth Kentucky Cavalry and at one time was provost marshal of one of Kentucky’s districts....

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Biography of James M. Drake

James M. Drake is one of Riverside’s representative and well-known businessmen, and has for years been the treasurer of the city, which responsible and important office he fills with honor and credit to himself and the municipality whose interests he so ably guards. Although not a pioneer of Riverside, her history would be incomplete without a fitting mention of Mr. Drake’s eight or ten years’ association with her interests. He is a native of Louisville, Kentucky, and dates his birth April 12, 1837. His parents were Charles and Mahala J. (Jeter) Drake. His father was a native of Virginia, a descendant of one of the old colonial families. Mr. Drake was reared in Louisville until the age of twelve years. At that time the death of his mother occurred and his father then moved to Marshall, Clark County, Illinois. After a residence of four years in that place the family moved to Nashville, Tennessee. Mr. Drake terminated his school days in the public schools of that city and then returned to Louisville and started in life by learning the trade of au upholsterer and house-furnisher. He then established himself in Shelbyville, Kentucky, where he remained until early in 1858, when he established au upholstering and house-furnishing business in Huntsville, Alabama. He was successfully conducting his enterprise when the secession movement and the formation of the Confederate government plunged his...

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Shelby County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Shelby County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Shelby County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Shelby County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at RootsWeb Census Transcription (Page 1 of 4) Census Transcription (Page 2 of 4) Census Transcription (Page 3 of 4) Census Transcription (Page 4 of 4) Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Shelby County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Shelby County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Shelby County USGenWeb Archives Project Breeden Surname Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Shelby County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 Shelby County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Shelby County USGenWeb Archives Project Breeden Surname Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Shelby County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1840 Shelby County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census...

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