Location: San Antonio Texas

Descendants of David E. Harding of Mansfield, MA

DAVID E. HARDING, deceased, who for more than a half century was a leading business man and manufacturer of Mansfield, Mass., was born there May 6, 1826. He was a descendant of an old Cape Ann family, the founder of the family in America being Edward Haraden, who came from Ipswich, England, to Gloucester. The name is found variously spelled, appearing as Haraden, Hardon and Harding, etc.

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The Cherokee Revolt – Indian Wars

From the removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia and Tennessee to Arkansas and their establishment upon the reservation allotted to them by treaty with the Government in Arkansas, they have, until the period of this outbreak to the narrative of which this chapter is devoted, been considered as among the least dangerous and most peaceable of the tribes in that region. But through various causes, chief among which has been notably the introduction among them of a horde of those pests of the West the border ruffians; these half wild, half-breed Nomads were encouraged by these Indians, as it appeared, for the sake of the liquor traffic. According to the official accounts of this attempt to reopen hostilities, it appears that on the 11th of April, 1872, it originated with a man named J. J. Kesterson, living in the Cherokee nation, near the Arkansas line, about fifty miles from Little Rock. On that day he went to Little Rock, and filed information against one Proctor, also a white man, married to a Cherokee woman, for assaulting with intent to kill him while in his saw mill, on the 13th of February. Proctor fired a revolver at Kesterson, the ball striking him just above the left eye, but before he could fire again Kesterson escaped. Proctor, at the time, was under indictment in the Snake District for the murder of his...

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Biography of Percival G. Lowe

Percival G. Lowe, for many years prominent in the public affairs of the city and county of Leavenworth, worth, was, in his young manhood, a typical plainsman and Kansas dragoon. He was essentially a man of action, and his only literary production in book form, “Five Years a Dragoon,” presents many cloarcut pictures of those early times. As a life-member and president (1893) of the State Historical Society he has also placed on record many valuable papers dealing with those subjects with which he was so practically identified. Mr. Lowe was born at Randolph, Coos County, New York, September 29, 1828, spent much of his boyhood and youth in Lowell, Massachusetts, and before he was twenty-one had spent three years upon the seas, engaged mainly in voyages to the West Indies and South America. In 1849 he joined the regular army and was stationed at Fort Leavenworth. In 1854, at the conclusion of his five-years’ service in the United States army, Mr. Lowe was appointed superintendent of transportation for Maj. E. A. Ogden, and was engaged in the construction of Fort Riley. He served as master of transportation both in General Sumner’s expedition against the Cheyennes, in 1857, and for General Johnson’s army sent against the Mormons in 1858. In the following year he severed his connection with the army and engaged in business in Denver and Leavenworth, finally...

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Biography of Frederick Funston

Frederick Funston, the most distinguished soldier who had ever gone forth from Kansas, was born at New Carlisle, Ohio, November 9, 1865, a son of Edward H, and Ann E. (Mitehell) Funston. When two years old his parents removed to Kansas, and in 1885 he became a student in the State University. He also attended the University in 1889-90, after which he was employed as a newspaper reporter in Kansas City, and the next year was botanist with the Death Valley expedition. General Funston was commissioned by the United States Agricultural Department, in 1893, to explore Alaska and report on the flora. When this work was completed he went to Cuba, where he served for eighteen months in the insurgent army in 1896-97, recaiving promotions to captain, major and lieutenant colonel. Having received a wound, he returned to the United States, and when the war was declared against Spain he was commissioned colonel of the Twentieth Kansas Infantry on May 20, 1898. His regiment was ordered to the Philippines and on May 2, 1899, Colonel Funston was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers for his bravery in crossing the Rio Grande River at Calumpit on a small raft and establishing a rope ferry in the face of a severe fire. He organized and led the expedition that captured Emilio Aguinaldo, the insurgent leader, and on April 1, 1901, was...

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Biography of W. A. Greever

W. A. GREEVER. The name of Greever is one of the most influential in Boone County, Arkansas, and is one of the most respected in the community. Mr. Greever deserves special notice for his public spirit and enery, and is now a prominent trader and speculator, and one of the largest land owners in the State. He is a native of the Blue Grass State, born in Adair County in 1836, and is a son of John and Sarah (Williams) Greever, both natives of Virginia. The father was born in the year 1807, and when but a small boy went with his parents to Kentucky. There the mother came with her parents also, when a child, and there they grew to mature years and married. Afterward the father tilled the soil, and being energetic and industrious he met with more than ordinary success. His death occurred in Kentucky in 1846. Mr. Greever’s grandfather, Abraham Greever, was born in the Old Dominion, but at an early date settled in Russell County, Kentucky, where he died about 1850. As a tiller of the soil he was very successful. His father, Philip Greever, was born in England. but when grown came to America. This was prior to the Revolutionary War, in which he served through the eight years of that struggle. He was under Gen. Greene, and fired the first gun at...

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Biography of Charles H. Browne

Charles H. Browne is proprietor and editor of the Horton Headlight-Commercial, now the only journal published in that enterprising and flourishing city of Brown County. Mr. Browne had been largely identified with newspaper work since he left school, and is a vigorous type of citizen and easily a leader in any community. For a number of years he had been connected with the National Guard of Kansas and had been especially active in recent events in which the country had been involved in tronble, first with Mexico and later with Germany. The Horton Headlight-Commercial is a consolidation of half a dozen different Horton newspapers. As reported in the “History of Kansas Newspapers,” issued by the Kansas State Historical Society, the Headlight-Commercial is a continuation of the Horton Headlight, founded in 1886 by Harley W. Brundige and Samuel Baer_ In 1901 it was consolidated with the Leader, which had been founded in 1899 by Johnson & Law. The name was changed to Horton Headlight-Leader, Johnson & Law editors and publishera. But the name was soon changed to Headlight, and this newspaper Mr. Browne purchased in 1906. In 1911 it consolidated with the Commercial under the name Headlight-Commercial, with Mr. Browne as editor and published. The Horton Commercial was founded in 1887 by John S. Sherdeman. At different times in its history the Headlight had had daily issucs. Mr. Charles H....

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Biography of Jay Palmer Farnsworth

Jay Palmer Farnsworth dates his residence in Muskogee from 1902, and has engaged in the practice of law in this city since 1904, having made steady advance in his profession, in which progress is made only through merit and ability. He came to Oklahoma from Texas, his birth having occurred in San Antonio, February 287 1880, his parents being J. P. and Helen (Bowker) Farnsworth. The father was a chemist, who during the youthful days of his son and namesake removed with the family to Topeka, Kansas, and there Jay P. Farnsworth of this review pursued a public school education. He afterward became a student in the Columbia National University at Washington, D. C., from which he was graduated on the completion of a literary course in 1900, while in 1902 he completed a course in the law department of the same institution. Immediately after his graduation Mr. Farnsworth was appointed a law clerk in the government offices in Muskogee and thus served until 1904. He then opened an office and has since devoted his attention to general law practice. He brought to the starting point of his career a keen, rapid, logical mind, plus the business sense and a ready capacity for hard work. He also brought certain rare gifts; eloquence of language and a strong personality which combined with a thorough grasp of the law and ability...

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Biography of William M. Price, Hon.

Hon. William M. Price, a resident of Kansas for fifteen years, is a successful banker, being now president of the Lyon County State Bank at Emporia, but over the state at large is best known through his services as a member of the State Senate. Senator Price was elected to the Senate in 1912, his present term expiring January 1, 1917. He represents the senatorial district comprising Greenwood and Lyon counties. He had the distinction of having been the chief supporter of the measure now on the Kansas statute books providing pensions for mothers. The Mothers’ Pension Bill as he introduced it in the Senate was drawn up along the lines endorsed by the courts and the various woman’s organizations, and though not adopted in that form he ardently championed it and deserves much credit for the passage of the modified measure as it now stands. During the legislative session of 1915 Senator Price was chairman of the banking committee and a member of the assessment and taxation committee, public utilities committee, election committee, and cities of second class committee. He is regarded as one of the most progressive leaders in his section of the state. William M. Price was born in San Antonio, Texas, July 31, 1870, a son of H. F. and Rebecoa M. (Chilcutt) Price, and in the paternal line is of Scotch-Welsh ancestors and German...

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Biography of Washington Grayson

Washington Grayson, prominently identified with the tribal government of the Creek Nation and closely associated with many public interests of importance to community and state, makes his home in Eufaula, where he is held in high respect and honor by all who know him. Mr. Grayson was born at Eufaula, Oklahoma, on the 15th of May, 1882, and is a son of George W. and Annie (Stidham) Grayson, both of whom are half-blood Creeks. The former was reared in and near Eufaula and was closely associated with public events in that section of Oklahoma then a part of the Indian Territory. George W. Grayson began his education in the district schools of the Creek Nation and later became a student in the Eufaula Boarding school. He afterward went to Webb City, Missouri, where he attended the Baptist school and at a later period became a student in a business college at Galveston, Texas. He next attended the West Texas Military Academy at San Antonio, Texas, for a period of four years and on completing his course there immediately received a commission as a Lieutenant in the Philippine Constabulary. Going to the Orient he served from August, 1903, until July, 1913, becoming familiar with all of the problems government. At length resigning his position, Mr. Grayson returned to Eufaula and the next two years constituted a period of leisure in...

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Biography of Colonel John Feudge

Colonel John Feudge was born in Waterford, Ireland, November 3, 1824. His parents came to the United States immediately after the inauguration of President John Quincy Adams. The subject of this sketch was first engaged assisting his father, who kept a market garden in the suburbs of New York City. When about sixteen years of age he was apprenticed and learned printing and stereotyping. He had worked some time, before becoming an apprentice, at type casting, by the old hand-mold method, and also as composing room devil, fly-boy, and wrapper-writer in the offices of the two great commercial papers of that day, the Courier and Enquirer, hand Journal of Commerce, both on Wall street, the presses then being turned by hand-crank. General James Watson Webb was editor of the former and “old Tom” Snowden business manager, two very prominent personages in those days; David Hale and Hallack being the editors and proprietors of the Journal. The first printing office entered by the subject of this sketch was the book and job office of Scatchard & Adams, 38 Gold Street, New York. This office was in the days of the old hand presses-before the introduction of the power press-the largest in the city, probably in the country. The firm was broken up by the sudden disappearance of Mr. Adams, whose remains having been cut up and packed in a box,...

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Porter, Timothy – Obituary

Timothy Porter, 30, of San Antonio, Texas, a former Baker City resident, died Aug. 7, 2003, at San Antonio. His memorial service will be at 6 p.m. Tuesday at Windcrest United Methodist Church in San Antonio. Tim was born at Colorado Springs, Colo., on Nov. 18, 1972. He moved to Baker City with his family when he was a year and half old. He attended grade school through junior high and part of high school in Baker City. He wrestled in junior high and high school before moving to San Antonio. He was a 1991 graduate of Roosevelt High School. He loved sports and hunting and fishing. He married Kerry Reid at San Antonio on Dec. 28, 1991. They had two children, Dylan, now age 11, and Taylor, age 9. Tim and Dylan were very active in sports. They loved going to ball games and Nascar races. Tim served on the Little League Board and was a member of Windcrest United Methodist Church. He was a dedicated and loving husband and father. He was always there for his family and friends. Survivors include his wife, Kerry; his son, Dylan; his daughter, Taylor; his mother, Margaret Porter; brothers, Randi, Billy and Robby and his wife, Cheryl; a sister-in-law, Carol; sisters, Nicki and her husband, John, Kandi and her husband, Ken, Tamara, Kricket and Shariah; an uncle and aunt, Jim and...

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Weber, Patrice Hoagy Mrs. – Obituary

Patrice Weber, 43, of Moses Lake, Wash., and formerly of Baker City and La Grande, died Aug. 21, 2001, at her home after a long illness. Kaiser Chapel of Memories in Moses Lake is in charge of arrangements. A private service will be held. Mrs. Weber was born Sept. 22, 1957, at Muencheller, Germany, to Charles Willard and Louise Mary Hoagy. She attended school in San Antonio, Texas, and modeling school in San Diego. On Sept. 12, 1987, she married Rob Weber, and the couple moved to Baker City, where she worked at Pioneer Bank. Later they moved to La Grande where she worked at Alayan, and then to Moses Lake, Wash., where she was office manager for Furniture West and also managed a Botan Hair Salon. She was an enthusiastic gardener, but her greatest love was her family. She is survived by her husband and children, Keven, Reed and Suzanne Lee Weber, all of Moses Lake; her father, who lives in Texas; and her mother, who lives in Arizona; and three sisters and four brothers. Used with permission from: The Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, August 31, 2001 Transcribed by: Belva...

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Biography of Peter Rainsford Brady

Among the early pioneers of Arizona, none bore a more prominent part in its development than Peter Rainsford Brady. He came, on his paternal side, from good old Irish stock. His mother, Anna Rainsford, was from Virginia. He was born in Georgetown, District of Columbia, August 4th, 1825; received his education, in part, at the Georgetown College, later entering the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, from which he was graduated about the year 1&44. After cruising around the Mediterranean Sea in the United States vessel “Plymouth,” he resigned from the navy, and left his home October 26th, 1846, for San Antonio, Texas, where he enlisted as a Lieutenant in the Texas Hangers, and served with distinction in the Mexican “War. After the war Mr. Brady joined a surveying party under Colonel Andrew B. Gray, who made a survey from Marshall, Texas, to El Paso; thence across the country to Tubac and from the latter point made branch surveys, one to Port Lobos on the Gulf of California, and the other to Fort Yuma and San Diego. Mr. Brady served as a captain on this expedition, and was prominent in many Indian fights. When the work was completed, the company disbanded at San Francisco. Mr. Brady was of an adventurous spirit, and in his younger life preferred the wilderness to the smooth paths of civilization. In 1854 he came to...

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Biography of Smith Deaf Smith

Erastus Smith, better known as “Deaf Smith,” was the son of Chiliab and Mary Smith, and was born in New York on the 19th of April 1787. At the age of eleven years he emigrated with his parents to the Mississippi Territory, and settled near Natchez. His parents were strict members of the Baptist Church, and gave him such moral and intellectual training, as the circumstances around them would permit. He first came to Texas in 1817 likely with some of the patriot forces that were constantly arriving at that time in the Province. He soon, however, returned home; but in 1821 he came again to Texas, for the purpose of making it his home. This he did, never leaving it. He was in the country before Stephen F. Austin, but in what section is not known. His nature was to ramble alone and be by himself. He was not entirely deaf, but unable to hear an ordinary conversation, and if such was going on around him would generally walk away and stand apart, gazing into space. He also had a habit, if anyone addressed him, of putting his finger to his lips, indicating by that, it was supposed, that he was unable to hear the one that addressed him. When the colony under Green DeWitt commenced settling where the town of Gonzales is now located, Smith was one...

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