Location: Rockingham County NH

Biography of Cyrus O. Brown

Cyrus O. Brown, formerly a well-known schoolmaster and now a prosperous farmer of Epsom, was born in Kensington, N.H., August 15, 1834, son of Abel and Ruth (Fellows) Brown. On the paternal side he is a lineal descendant of John Brown, who, born in England in 1589, is said to have been of Scotch origin. It is believed that this ancestor was reared in a seaport town, as he was a ship-carpenter by trade. It is recorded that he was concerned in the building of many vessels for the king. He emigrated to New England, and became one of the first settlers of Hampton, N.H. He was married in that town in 1640 or 1641; and Benjamin, the second of his three sons, was born in Seabrook, N.H. From John Brown, born in England in 1589, the line of descent comes by Benjamin Brown, born in Seabrook, in 1647; Benjamin Brown, Jr., born in South Hampton in 1684; Jonathan Brown, born in Kensington in 1718; Abel Brown, born in Kensington in 1760; and Abel Brown, Jr., born in Kensington in 1797. Abel Brown, Sr., the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a school teacher in his younger days. Taking an active part in public affairs, he served as a Selectman, and was employed to settle many estates. He lived to the age of eighty-six years. In politics...

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Biography of Charles Mortimer Bingham

Charles Mortimer Bingham, a former well-known merchant of Claremont, Sullivan County, N.H., was born in New London, Conn., February 22, 1804, son of Nathan Bingham. His father settled in Claremont in 1809. He was a hatter by trade, and carried on a large and successful business here. He was a musician, and played the bass-viol in the Episcopal church for years. He died at the age of seventy-eight. He had six children. His daughter Lucretia married Ralph Metcalf, who became the governor of New Hampshire. Her sister Elizabeth married Luther S. Porter, and Maria became the wife of Henry W. Galpin. Silas L., one of the three sons, was a professional voice teacher. He died in Cleveland, Ohio. George, the only surviving member of the family, resides in Minneapolis, Minn. Both Elizabeth and Silas Bingham had remarkable voices. In 1818, at the age of fourteen, Charles Mortimer Bingham began to fit himself for a business career by entering the employ of Josiah Stevens & Sons, dealers in general merchandise, his father, Nathan Bingham, having made an agreement with the firm that, under certain conditions, he should remain with them until twenty-one years of age. We copy, with a few verbal corrections, the following well-told story of his life and character: “A typical New Englander, having completed his term of service with Josiah Stevens, he struck out for himself. He...

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Biography of Francis W. Blake

Francis W. Blake, one of Pittsfield’s successful farmers, was born in Hampton Falls, N.H., September 3, 1837, son of Enoch and Lydia (Smith) Blake. The family is of English origin. Its founder, Jasper Blake, who came from England in 1640 and settled at Hampton, N.H., was a relative of Robert Blake, the famous British admiral of that period. The great-grandfather of Francis W. was Jeremiah Blake, son of Joshua. He was a native of Hampton Falls, and a farmer by occupation. He was the father of five children, of whom Enoch (first), the grandfather, was the eldest. Enoch Blake (first) was born in Hampton Falls, and grew to manhood as a farmer in that town. He served in the Revolutionary War under General Stark. In 1787 he moved to Pittsfield, and occupied a part of the farm now owned by his grandson, Francis W. In politics he was a Democrat, and in religious belief he was a Free Will Baptist. At his death he was sixty-nine years old. He married Hannah Eastman, a native of Kensington, N.H. Of their five children who attained maturity Enoch (second) was the eldest. Born in Pittsfield, August 22, 1796, he was engaged in agricultural pursuits during the greater part of his active period, and also followed the trades of carpenter and cooper to some extent. Prosperity rewarded his industry. In politics he supported...

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Biography of Sherburn Josiah Winslow

Sherburn Josiah Winslow, one of the most prominent business men and influential residents of Pittsfield, was born in Nottingham, N.H., March 16, 1834, son of Josiah and Ruth (Tucker) Winslow. By both paternal grandparents, each of whom was a Winslow, he is directly descended from Governor Edward Winslow, who came with the Pilgrims in the “Mayflower.” The grandfather, Elisha Winslow, was a prosperous farmer of Nottingham, and lived to a good old age. He was the father of six children, all now deceased. Josiah Winslow, the second child and the eldest son of Elisha, was born in Nottingham, November 12, 1797. He was reared to farm life, but learned the tanner’s and shoemaker’s trades, which he followed for many years. He finally moved to Pittsfield, and his last days were spent upon the farm in this town. A citizen of more than ordinary worth, he acquired a high reputation for honesty. He was a supporter of the Democratic party, and took a lively interest in local politics. His wife, Ruth, whose father, James Tucker, was born in Salisbury, Mass., April 15, 1766, became the mother of four children, namely: Sally T., deceased; James T., deceased; Sherburn J., the subject of this sketch; and Atilla J., deceased. James T. married Fanny Hall, of Illiana, Ill., and had one son, James Albert. Josiah Winslow died at the age of sixty-six years,...

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Biography of James Yeaton

James Yeaton, a well-known farmer of Epsom, Merrimack County, was born in this town, January 11, 1832, son of John and Sarah (Bickford) Yeaton. His ancestors for several generations were prosperous farmers in this State; and his great-grandfather, John Yeaton (first), was a pioneer settler in Epsom. John Yeaton, second, grandfather of James, was a native of this town, and resided here his entire life. A successful farmer, he accumulated considerable property. He was a Democrat in politics and a Congregationalist in his religious views. At his death he was about eighty-one years old. He was three times married. His first wife, whose maiden name was Bickford, died at the age of twenty-five. Of her two sons who attained maturity, John was the elder. The father married for his second wife a Miss Towle, who had three children, none of whom are living. His third marriage, which was made with the widow of William Yeaton, resulted in no children. John Yeaton, third, was born in Epsom, March 29, 1804. He was reared to farming, which he followed successfully during his active period; and he died at the age of seventy-six years, leaving a good estate. He was one of the prominent men of his day. While not an office-seeker for himself, he took an active part in securing the election of capable officials. In politics he acted with the...

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Genealogy of Charles Allen Family

J132 CHARLES ALLEN: first mentioned in Portsmouth, N. H., in 1657. When he came to America is not known. He was born about 1625 and died about 1705. He married in 1667 Suzanna Huggins, of Hampton, N. H. This was evidently the second marriage of Charles, for in a deed conveying his lands and property in Greenland, N. H., to Suzanna Huggins, and dated 1666, he refers to his daughter Mary. by a former wife. He had by his second wife (1) Daniel, date of birth unknown, who m. Hannah Berry prior to 1705. He d. Jan. 22, 1746. He had John (date of birth unknown, who was adopted by his uncle, John Allen, in 1714. No record of his marriage, but he had Reuben, b. 1738; John, bapt. 1741), and Daniel, Jr., date of birth unknown, married twice, first wife unknown, second was Lydia Hicks, and they were married prior to 1756. The children by the first wife are Suzannah, Sarah and Josiah, who was b. May 31, 1744, married, 1779, Bathsheba Nelson, of Newmarket, N. H., b. June 30, 1755. He d. at Epsom, N. H., 1821; served in the Revolutionary War. Josiah had Joseph, b. Mar. 11, 1781 (m., 1812, Mary Batchelder and d. Feb. 22, 1863; no ch. shown); Josiah H., b. July 11, 1786 (m. Betsy Merrill and d. Mar. 11, 1869; no ch....

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Fort Columbus or Fort Jay

Even Governor’s Island, once a smiling garden, appertaining to the sovereigns of the province, was now covered with fortifications, inclosing a tremendous blockhouse, – so that this once peaceful island resembled a fierce little warrior in a big cocked hat, breathing gunpowder and defiance to the world! – Washington Irving, “Knickerbocker’s New York.” The graceful little island of Washington Irving is described in a recent publication of the government printing office at Washington after the following eloquent fashion: ” Irregular in form but approaches nearly the segment of an oblate spheroid, its longest diameter being from north to south, and about 800 yards in length. The transverse diameter is about 500 yards. It has an elevation above high water mark of 20 feet, and its face is smooth and green, with a rich carpet of grass.” On the top of the highest feature of this smooth, green face with its rich carpet of grass is Fort Columbus, more properly known by its ancient name of Fort Jay. No doubt you will find it hard to visualize the importance of Fort Jay. It is the headquarters of the Department of the East of the army of the United States, you may be told. Yes, you will answer indifferently, it is a quiet little place, not nearly so noisy as the roaring forties of Broadway; it keeps to itself and is...

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Biographical Sketch of Aldrich, Thomas Bailey

Aldrich, Thomas Bailey, son of Elias T. and Sara (Bailey) Aldrich, was born in Portsmouth, Rockingham County, N. H., November 11, 1836. He received his early education at the common schools in New Orleans, La., and at the Temple grammar school in Portsmouth. He commenced a course of study preparatory to entering college, but having the misfortune, in his fifteenth year, to lose his father, he abandoned that purpose, and entered the counting-room of an uncle, a merchant in New York. Her he remained for three years, and it was during that period that he began to contribute verses to the New York journals. A collection of his poems was published in 1855, the volume taking its name from the initial poem, “The Bells.” Mr. Aldrich’s most successful poem, “Babie Bell,” which was published in 1856, was copied and repeated all over the country. His next position was that of proofreader, and then reader for a publishing house. He became a frequent contributor to the New York “Evening Mirror,” “Putnam’s Magazine,” “The Knickerbocker,” and the weekly newspapers, for one of which he wrote “Daisy’s Necklace and What Came of It,” a prose poem which was afterwards issued in a volume, and attained a wide popularity. In 1856 Mr. Aldrich joined the staff of the “Home Journal,” continuing in this position for three years. He was also connected with the...

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Biography of David Bailey

David Bailey. In the latter part of 1854 or the early part of 1855 Mr. Bailey moved to Monticello, Illinois. After a short sojourn there he came to Urbana, and in March or April, 1856, moved to Champaign, where for a number of years, in connection with W. B. Bailey, he conducted a small country store in a frame building that he erected on the site now occupied by the Robeson Department Store. David Bailey was one of the thirteen men who founded the First National Bank of Champaign, in 1865. Application for organization was made to the government in January, 1865, and certificate was issued in April, 1865. The thirteen men signing up were in the following order: J. S. Wright, J. H. Thomas, W. M. Way, Hamilton J. Jefferson, B. F. Harris, J. S. Beasley, David Bailey, Daniel Gardner, W. C. Barrett, Simeon H. Busey, S. P. Percival, J. G. Clark and A. E. Harmon. Each took fifty shares, making a capital of sixty-five thousand dollars. David Bailey disposed of his interest in the bank some time in the ’70s. In 1882 he, with other men, founded the Champaign National Bank. The nine men signing the organization certificate and present at the organization were: Edward Bailey, 110 shares; Wm. S. Maxwell, 100 shares; Jas. C. Miller, 150 shares; Bernard Kelley, 40 shares; David Bailey, 60 shares; Isaac...

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Biography of Meserve M. Getchell

The popular postmaster of Silver City and one of the proprietors of the Idaho Hotel of that place is Mr. Getchell, who was born at Baring, Maine, January 5, 1868. His ancestors were natives of Wales, who emigrated to this country at an early day. His great-great-grandfather, Benjamin Getchell, was born February 4, 1753, married Mehitable Meserve and moved to St. Stephens, New Brunswick. He assisted in the capture of the English schooner Diligence and her armed cutter Tatmagouch July 14, 1775, being a volunteer in Captain John Preble’s company, the colonel of the company being John Allen. The great-grandfather, Joseph Getchell, and his son of the same name, fought in the Revolutionary war and were members of the volunteer crew on the sloop Unity, which, under the command of Captain Jeremiah O’Brien, captured the English armed schooner Margaretta, June 12, 1775. The grandfather of our subject, Daniel Getchell, was born in St. Stephens, New Brunswick, January 24, 1785, and married Miss Elizabeth Grimmer, who was born May 6, 1806. He died January 10, 1876. Their son, Asher B. Getchell, the father of our subject, was born at St. James Mills, New Brunswick, September 3, 1829. When he was ten years old he removed to Baring, Maine, where he grew to manhood and married Miss Julia F. Smith, a daughter of Dr. S. M. and Mary Ellen (Nickerson) Smith...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles C. Bolton

Bolton, Charles C.; capitalist; born, Cleveland, March 23, 1855; son of Judge Thomas Bolton; educated, public schools, Miss Guilford’s Academy, the Phillips Exeter Academy, of Exeter, N. H., and Harvard University, B. A., 1877; married, Cleveland, Nov. 24, 1880, Miss Julia Castle, daughter of William Castle, a former mayor of Cleveland; four surviving children: Chester, Irving, Newell and Julian; after graduating, spent two years traveling abroad; became identified with Rhodes & Co., the predecessors of M. A. Hanna & Co.; remained with that firm 25 years; retired in 1904, devoting time to private interests; charter member of Troop A; served in every capacity from private to captain; now veteran member; life member Chamber of Commerce; director and chair-man of Military Committee; Republican; member St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Union, University and Country Clubs, of Cleveland, and Duquesne Club, Pittsburgh; interested in charity and philanthropy; former pres. Associated Charities. Recreations: Hunting, Fishing, Travel and Motoring; member Winan’s Point Shooting Club and Castalia Sporting...

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Biography of Samuel N. Simpson

Samuel N. Simpson. A notable life came to a close with the death of Samuel N. Simpson on November 27, 1915: Important though his achievements were in the field of business and in the development of many useful enterprises and undertakings in the cities of Lawrence and Kansas City, Kansas, it is because his activities and influence were so vitally identified with the primitive period of the territorial Kansas that his individual history bulks so large in the annals of the state and furnishes a chapter that may be read with instruction and profit by every student of Kansas annals. The story of his early experiences was well told in his own words. He wrote them at the request of his children, and it was due to a modesty which was one of his characteristics that he never used the pronoun I in the entire recital. It is a narrative simply told and with a personal detachment and candor that makes it one of the most illuminating chapters in Kansas history. There is every propriety in permitting the readers of this publication to see through the eyes of Mr. Simpson the conditions as he saw them in the early territorial period. He begins his narrative with a brief description of the conditions which prevailed as a result of the struggle between the free state and pro-slavery elements for the...

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Biographical Sketch of Worchester Reed Warner

Warner, Worchester Reed; manufacturer; born, Cummington, Hampshire County, Mass., May 16, 1846; son of Franklin J. and Vesta Wales (Reed) Warner; educated, district school, Cummington; (D. Mech. Sc., Western University of Pennsylvania, 1897) ; married, Cleveland, Cornelia F. Blakemore, of Philadelphia, June 26, 1890; learned machinist’s trade at Boston and at Exeter, N. H.; with Pratt & Whitney Co., Hartford, Conn.; 1870-1880, and at same time pursued studies in astronomy, and other scientific branches, and experimented in telescope building as a recreation; in 1881, with Ambrose Swasey, established firm of Warner & Swasey, incorporated as The Warner & Swasey Co., 1900; mfrs. machine tool and optical instruments of precision, including range-finders, gunsights, field telescopes, etc., for the government; director Citizens’ Savings & Trust Co., Cleveland Society for Savings; trustee Western Reserve University, Case School of Applied Science; fellow Royal Astronomical Society, A. A. A. S.; member British Astronomical Society, American Society Mechanical Engineers (mgr. 1890-1893, pres. 1896-1897); past pres. Civil Engineers Club, Cleveland; Republican. Clubs: Union, Country, University, Sleepy Hollow...

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Biographical Sketch of John Howard Webster

Webster, John Howard; assignee The Variety Iron Works Co.; born, Portsmouth, N. H., Nov. 8, 1846; came to CIeveland in 1850; public school education, graduated from Yale in 1868; degree A. B., Union Law College, 1870; degree LL. B.; received degree of A. M. from Yale in 1871; engaged in the practice of law in Cleverland until 1891, when he was appointed assignee for the Variety Iron Works Co.; still serving; pres. Chamberlain Cartridge & Target Co., Buckeye Milling Co.; vice pres. Penton Publishing Co.; interested in other corporations; member Union, University, Rowfant Clubs, Cleveland, and University Club, New Haven, Conn.; member Japan Society, London,...

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Biographical Sketch of Ambrose Swasey

Swasey, Ambrose; manufacturer; born, Exeter, N. H., Dec. 19, 1846; son of Nathaniel and Abigail Chesley (Peavey) Swasey; early education in schools of Exeter; degree of engineering Case School of Applied Science, 1905; Sc. D. Denison University, Granville, O., 1910; married, Hampton, N. IL, Oct. 24, 1871, Lavinia D. Marston, daughter of David and Sarah Ann (Dearborn) Marston; entered into partnership with W. R. Warner (Warner & Swasey), 1880, mfrs. machine tools and astronomical instruments; the 36-inch Lick telescope, the 26-inch of Naval observatory, Washington, the 40-inch Yerkes telescope, as well as a new and exceptionally accurate dividing engine, are some of the firm’s achievements; invented Swasey Range and Position Finder, adopted by the United States Government; pres. The Warner & Swasey Co., pres. the Caxton Building Co.; director the Cleveland Trust Co.; Chevalier Legion of Honor, France, 1900; trustee of Denison University, Granville, O.; vice pres. Y. M. C. A.; past pres. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, N. Y.; past pres. the Cleveland Engineering Society; past pres. Chamber of Commerce; member Institution of Mechanical Engineers of Great Britain and British Astronomical Assn; fellow Royal Astronomical Society; member Country Club, Cleveland; Engineers Club, N. Y., University Club,...

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