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Location: Queens County NY

Biography of Joseph C. Dodds, M. D., B. L.

Joseph C. Dodds, M. D., B. L. Long identified with Champaign County as a physician and surgeon and also as a citizen and business man, Doctor Dodds has lived in this county since he was ten years of age. He was born on Long Island, New York, June 15, 1864. At the age of ten he came to Champaign to live with his uncle, Dr. J. G. Chambers, brother of his mother. Here Doctor Dodds was educated, graduating from the Urbana High School, from the University of Illinois with the class of 1886, attended the University of Michigan Medical School and in 1889 graduated M. D. from Northwestern University at Chicago. For twenty-five continuous years Doctor Dodds practiced medicine in Champaign County. He was an interne in the Marine Hospital of Chicago, and for some years was on the staff of the Kankakee Eastern Hospital and was district surgeon for the Illinois Central Railway between Gilman and Effingham. In 1908 he was appointed state medical director of the Modern Woodmen of America, and reappointed in 1911. In 1901 Doctor Dodds moved to Denver, Colorado, where he practiced a year and following that for nine years was located at Tolono, Illinois. While at Tolono he held the various offices of the village from mayor down, and his present home is at 622 West Hill Street in Champaign, where he owns...

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Biography of Henry Knight Brooks

Henry Knight Brooks of Topeka is a Kansas man by adoption, and is as loyal to the state as any native citizen. The state may properly congratulate itself that Mr. Brooks has found a congenial home here. As an inventor, manufacturer and practical all around mechanic he has a genius which has made his name familiar in industrial circles, not alone in Kansas but in many parts of the United States. For one thing he deserves credit for building up and developing the Capital Iron Works at Topeka, one of the cornerstones of that city’s industrial prosperity. However, that has been only one phase of his busy career. He was born in Kettering, Northamptonshire, England, January 8, 1869. His father, William Weston Brooks, was a college man and for many years was superintendent of public schools at Kettering in Northamptonshire, and later at Wisbech, Cambridgeshire. His mother was Eliza Knight, whose ancestors were Huguenot fugitives that found refuge in England from their persecutors in France. Mr. Brooks’ matternal grandfather, Joseph J. Knight, was president of Albion College, South Hackney, and became a noted man in the East End of London, where much of his life was devoted to work among the slums and poorer classes. He advocated temperance when such a virtue was almost considered a crime, and he was caricatured as Anthony Hum in the Pickwick papers by...

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Biography of William W. Rose

William W. Rose has been practicing his profession as architect in the metropolitan district of Kansas City for thirty years. Without question he ranks as one of the ablest men both in the artistic and practical branches of his profession. Mr. Rose had also been prominently identified with civic affairs, and is well remembered as mayor of Kansas City, Kansas, during a very critical period of municipal affairs. He is now head of the architectural firm of Rose & Peterson, with offices in the Barker Building. He was born at Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York, March 12, 1864, second of the three children of George Bruce and Charlotte N. (Warren) Rose. His father was a native of Jefferson County and his mother of St. Lawrence County, New York, the former born August 24, 1827, and the latter July 9, 1830. George B. Rose was of Scotch descent and spent forty years in the milling business, chiefly at Ogdensburg, New York. He died in 1887 and his wife in 1904. He was a republican, a member of the Masonic Order, and he and his wife were active in the Congregational Church. William W. Rose had a good home environment as a boy and attended the common schools and the Ogdensburg University. His inclinations and early talents were in the direction of architecture, and he gained his first training with...

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Alcock, Percy Hunt – Obituary

Percy H. Alcock, a well-known San Carlos resident of 24 years, died yesterday [September 19, 1967] in San Francisco after a short illness. He and his wife, Augusta, have lived at 729 Elm Street. Mr. Alcock was born in Grantham, England, and came to the United States in 1910, residing in Long Island, New York. He was a veteran of World War I and during his lifetime was a public accountant and worked also as a cost accountant for an advertising agency. He was retired at the time he passed away and his favorite hobby was gardening. The flowers he preferred were sweet peas and delphinium. He was active in First Church of Christ, Scientist, San Carlos, and was a Christian Science Practitioner. Survivors besides his wife, Augusta, at the family home were two sons, Richard R. Alcock and David Alcock of San Jose. Five-month-old David Eric Alcock, son of Richard, is the surviving grandchild. Private services for the family will be held Friday at the White Oaks Chapel in San Carlos. Inurnment will be private at Alta Mesa Cemetery, Palo Alto. The family prefers memorial contributions to go to Valentine Haven, 15 – 9th Avenue, San Mateo. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Cooke, Robert – Obituary

Robert Cooke, 72, of Ellensburg, died Friday at the Gold Leaf Care Center. He was born on Long Island, New York, January 1, 1917. He and Gwen (Ferguson) Davis were married in Seattle on Sept. 20, 1951. They came to Ellensburg in 1957. Mr. Cooke was a merchant seaman until retirement in 1965. Survivors include his wife, Gwen, of Ellensburg; two stepsons, Robert Davis, of Ellensburg, and John Davis, of Walnut Creek, Calif.; two stepdaughters, Patty Ridas, of Los Angeles, Calif., and Betty McKenzie, of Roy, Utah; seven grandchildren; nine great grandchildren; one brother, Benson Cooke, of St. Petersburg, Fla.; and one sister, Lucille Cooke, of Long Island, NY. A memorial service will be held at a later date with inurnment at graveside. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Biographical Sketch of John B. Jones

John B. Jones, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Rardin; born in Franklin Co., N. Y., Sept. 1, 1829; he removed with his parents when quite young to Whitehall, Washington Co., where he attended school and engaged in farming until 15 years of age, when he learned and worked at the ship-carpenter’s trade for three years; then for two years followed sailing on the lakes, and his trade; after which time he located at Astoria, L. I., where he engaged at his trade until 1857, when he emigrated to Illinois, and located in Ashmore Tp., Coles Co., March 1, of the same year; here he purchased land and engaged in farming until 1870, when he located upon his present place, where he has since continued to live, and where he has eighty-nine acres, upon which he erected his residence in 1871; here he located in the timber and has, during the last eight years, cleared and placed under cultivation upward of fifty acres of land by his own hard labor. His marriage with Sarah Smith was celebrated Dee. 24, 1856; she was born in Queens Co., N. Y., May 13, 1839; they have three children now living by this union, viz., John Paul, born Nov. 8, 1857; Stephen B., born Feb. 8, 1865, and Isaac P., born May 11, 1868; the names of the deceased are George W. and William...

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Biography of William Hunt

Practically all of the Hunts in America are of English descent, and a family of this name coming from Ireland is rarely to be met with. Those about to be mentioned, however, are the exception. and are numbered among the great mass of their countrymen who, while preserving their identity to a greater or less extent, have become one of the important component parts of the American people. Among the sturdy Irishmen who were compelled by famine and oppression to emigrate to the United States prior to 1850, was William Hunt, a native of Queens county. Instead of remaining for any great length of time in a large centre of people he wisely sought a home in the agricultural districts and settling in Geneseo, Livingston county, New York, he found ample opportunity for the exercise of his industry and thrift. He married Johanna Conroy, also a native of Ireland. Children John F., a resident of Rochester, New York; Thomas R., who also is residing in that city; Charles J.; Mary, married Patrick Landers; Johanna, (lied November 4, 1898; and William J.. whose sketch follows. All received the advantages of a good education and careful moral training. William J., a son of William and Johanna Hunt. was born in Geneseo, New York, August 4, 1869. He pursued his preliminary studies at district school No. 3, in his native town, and...

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Biography of George F. Licht

George F. Licht, ex-mayor of the town of Geneva, Ontario county, New York, at present superintendent and assistant treasurer of the Patent Cereals Company of Geneva, New York, is one of the most prominent men in that section of the country, and has served it in a number of public offices. George F. Licht was born on Long Island, New York, August 18, 1860. He was educated in the Brooklyn and other Long Island schools, and was graduated from the Brooklyn high school. At the age of sixteen years he entered the employ of Tiffany & Company, jewelers, of New York City, to learn the trade of fine engraving, and remained with this firm for a period of ten years. He then became engaged in the milling business with his father, and has been connected with this line since that time. He was one of the incorporators of the Patent Cereals Company of Geneva, and in addition to being the superintendent and assistant treasurer, is a director and one of the largest stockholders. His public career has been a diversified one. In 1902 he was appointed by Daniel E. Moore, then mayor of Geneva, as a member of the purchasing committee for the city of Geneva; he was appointed by the same authority as a member of the fire commission; in 1903 he was elected mayor of Geneva; was...

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Biographical Sketch of John Carpenter

(XII) John (6), son of John (5) Carpenter, was born in Connecticut, in 1658. His will was proved July 30, 1732. He lived in Jamaica, and took the oath as captain of troops there, November 22, 1703. He married Mary – . Children; born at Jamaica: Nehemiah, about 1685; John, about 1685; Solomon, about 1685; Joseph, about 1687; Increase, about 1688, mentioned elsewhere; Mary; Hannah; Susanna;...

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Biographical Sketch of Increase Carpenter

(XIII) Increase, son of John (6) Carpenter, was born in Jamaica, about 1688. He bought land in Jamaica in 1709. He died about 1776. He married Bergin. Children, born at Jamaica: William, 1740; Increase, April, 1743; Jacob, 1745, mentioned elsewhere: John, 1747; David, married Mary Carpenter; Luke; Elizabeth, married Benjamin...

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Biographical Sketch of Jacob Carpenter

(XIV) Jacob, son of Increase Carpenter, was born in Jamaica, in 1745, and married Widow Jane Smith, before her first marriage, Jane Baylis. She died May 6, 1813. He was a farmer by occupation and died in 1819 or 1820. Children, born in Jamaica: Increase, mentioned elsewhere: Jacob; Nathaniel; Daniel, married Hepsabeth Higbee; Benjamin, died about 1837; Deborah, married William Lewis; Catharine, married Alexander...

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Biographical Sketch of John Carpenter

(XI) John (5), son of William (4) Carpenter, was born in England about 1628, died May 23, 1695. He came from England with his father, and when about seventeen went to Connecticut. For several years he lived in different towns in the latter state, and worked at his trade as carpenter. He was in Stratford, Connecticut, in 1646, and in 1660 bought land in Hempstead, Long Island. He was chosen townsman of Hempstead in 1663, and was made freeman of the state of Connecticut, May, 1664. He bought land in Jamaica, Long Island, in 1665. In 1673 he was made captain of a company of fusileers in Jamaica, and that same year was ordered with his company to defend Fort James, New York, against the fleet of the Prince of Orange. This was at the time of the recapture of New York by the Dutch. He was a patentee of the town of Jamaica tinder the “Dongan Patent” of 1680, and the tract bought by him there was occupied by three generations after him. He married (probably) Hannah Hope. Children, born in Jamaica: John. 1658, mentioned elsewhere; Hope, married Mary ; William, 1662; Samuel, 1666; Solomon, 1670: Ruth, married Rhodes; Ludman; daughter, name not known, married...

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Biography of John W. McNamara

JOHN W. McNAMARA A TRULY representative Albanian, who is actively engaged in a work highly conducive to the comfort and convenience of his fellow citizens, is John W. McNamara, the present efficient general manager and treasurer of the Albany railway. His career is interesting and instructive as showing a progressive mind with comprehensive views, and adaptability for filling with marked success different official relations of an intellectual or purely practical business nature. He was born on the 9th of January, 1839, at the town of Watervliet, Albany County, near what is now known as Karnerville. He is a son of Hugh McNamara and Ellen his wife, who, seeking to better their financial condition left the shores of their native land – Ireland – and sailed for America in 1832. On reaching this country they found their way to Albany, where they first located. After staying here for a brief period Mr. Hugh McNamara, who was a wide-awake business man and familiar with railroad matters, received the appointment of track superintendent on the old Mohawk and Hudson River railroad, and removed to the town of Watervliet before the close of 1832. Here in the midst of a rustic settlement John W. McNamara, the subject of our sketch, passed the first five years of his life, blessed with the tender care and filial affection of parents over whom the grave has...

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Matinecoc Tribe

Matinecoc Indians. An Algonquian tribe which formerly inhabited the northwest coast of Long Island, New York, from Newtown, Queens county, to Smithtown, Suffolk county. They had villages at Flushing, Glen Cove, Cold Spring, Huntington, and Cow Harbor, but even before the intrusion of the whites they had become greatly reduced, probably through wars with the Iroquois, to whom they paid tribute. In 1650 Secretary Van Tienhoven reported but 50 families left of this once important tribe. Ruttenber includes them in his Montauk group, which is about equivalent to Metoac; but the interrelationship of the tribes in the western part of Long Island has not been definitely...

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