Location: Prairie County AR

Slave Narrative of Lizzie Johnson

Interviewer: Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Lizzie Johnson Location: Biscoe, Arkansas Place of Birth: Holly Springs, Mississippi Age: 65 Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. LIZZIE JOHNSON 706 North Senate Avenue, Apt. 1 Mrs. Johnson’s father, Arthur Locklear, was born in Wilmington, N.C. in 1822. He lived in the South and endured many hardships until 1852. He was very fortunate in having a white man befriend him in many ways. This man taught him to read and write. Many nights after a hard days work, he would lie on the floor in front of the fireplace, trying to study by the light from the blazing wood, so he might improve his reading and writing. He married very young, and as his family increased, he became ambitious for them. Knowing their future would be very dark if they remained South. He then started a movement to come north. There were about twenty-six or twenty-eight men and women, who had the same thoughts about their children, banded together, and in 1852 they started for somewhere, North. The people selected, had to be loyal to the cause of their children’s future lives, morally clean, truthful, and hard-working. Some had oxen, some had carts. They pooled all of their scant belongings, and started on their long hard journey. The women and children rode...

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Biography of James O. Nicholson

JAMES O. NICHOLSON. The gentleman whose name opens this sketch is the oldest merchant in Boone County, Arkansas, and has given his attention to the business in which he is now engaged in Harrison since 1868. He came to this place with Capt. H. W. Fick, with whom he was in business for about two years, when he became the sole proprietor of the establishment, and has continued as such up to the present time. He carries a large stock of general merchandise, and the building he occupies at the southeast corner of the public square is a two-story structure, having a frontage of thirty-five feet and a depth of one hundred feet. He at all times keeps an excellent and extensive line of goods, and has met with well-merited success, being a leader in his line in the northern part of the State. Mr. Nicholson was born in Madison County, Tennessee, March 15, 1844, being the eldest son and second child in a family of ten children born to James W. and E. J. (Newby) Nicholson, the former of whom was born in South Carolina, but was an early resident of the State of Tennessee, where he made his home until 1851, when he came to Prairie County, Arkansas, and became one of the first settlers of Hickory Plains. In 1858 he moved to Pope County, and in...

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Slave Narrative of Lucindy Allison

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Lucindy Allison Location: Marked Tree, Arkansas (with children at Biscoe, Arkansas) Age: 61 “Ma was a slave in Arkansas. She said she helped grade a hill and help pile up a road between Wicksburg and Wynne. They couldn’t put the road over the hill, so they put all the slaves about to grade it down. They don’t use the road but it’s still there to show for itself. “She was a tall rawbony woman. Ma was a Hillis and pa’s name was Adam Hillis. He learned to trap in slavery and after freedom he followed that for a living. Ma was a sure ‘nough field hand. Mama had three sets of children. I don’t know how many she did have in all. I had eleven my own self. Grandma was named Tempy and I heard them tell about when she was sold. She and mama went together. They used to whoop the slaves when they didn’t work up peart. “When the ‘Old War’ come on and the Yankees come they took everything and the black men folks too. They come by right often. They would drive up at mealtime and come in and rake up every blessed thing was cooked. Have to go work scrape about and find something else to eat. What they keer ’bout you being white or black? Thing they...

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Slave Narrative of Ed Allen

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Ed Allen Location: Des Arc, Ark. “I know that after freedom they took care of my pa and ma and give em a home long as they lived. Ma died wid young mistress here in Des Arc. “The present generation is going to the bad. Have dealings wid em, not good to you. Young folks ain’t nice to you like they used to be. “White boys and colored boys, whole crowd of us used to go in the river down here all together, one got in danger help him out. They don’t do it no more. We used to play base ball together. All had a good time. We never had to buy a ball or a bat. Always had em. The white boys bought them. I don’t know as who to blame but young folk...

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Slave Narrative of Henry Anthony

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Henry Anthony Location: Biscoe, Arkansas Age: 84 “I was born at Jackson, North Carolina. My master and mistress named Betsy and Jason Williams but my pa’s name was Anthony. My young master was a orderly seargent. He took me wid him to return some mules and wagons. He showed me what he want done an I followed him round wid wagons. The wagons hauled ammunition and provisions. Pa worked for the master and ma cooked. They got sold to Lausen Capert. When freedom come they went back and stayed a month or two at Williams then we all went back to John Odom. We stayed round close and farmed and worked till they died. I married and when I had four or five children I heard ob dis country. I come on immigration ticket to Mr. Aydelott here at Biscoe. Train full of us got together and come. One white man got us all up and brought us here to Biscoe. I farmed for Mr. Aydelott four or five years, then for Mr. Bland, Mr. Scroggin. “I never went to school a day in my life. I used to vote here in Biseoe right smart. I let the young folks do my votin. They can tell more about it. I sho do not think it is the woman’s place to vote an hold...

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Slave Narrative of Josephine Ann Barnett

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Location: De Valls Bluff, Arkansas Age: 75 or 80 “I do not knows my exact age. I judge I somewhere between 75 and 80 years old. I was born close to Germantown, Tennessee. We belong, that is my mother, to Phillip McNeill and Sally McNeill. My mother was a milker. He had a whole heap of hogs, cattle and stock. That not all my mother done. She plowed. Children done the churnin’. “The way it all come bout I was the onliest chile my mother had. Him and Miss Sallie left her to help gather the crop and they brought me in the buggy wid them. I set on a little box in the foot of the buggy. It had a white umbrella stretched over it. Great big umbrella run in between them. It was fastened to the buggy seat. When we got to Memphis they loaded the buggy on the ship. I had a fine time coming. When we got to Bucks Landing we rode to his place in the buggy. It is 13 miles from here (De Valls Bluff). In the fall nearly all his slaves come out here. Then when my mother come on. I never seen my papa after I left back home [TR: Crossed out: (near Germantown)]. My father belong to Boston Hack. He wouldn’t sell and Mr. McNeill wouldn’t...

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Slave Narrative of Emmett Beal

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Emmett Beal Age: 78 Location: Biscoe, Arkansas “I was born in Holloman County, Bolivar, Tennessee. Master Dr. Jim May owned my set er folks. He had two girls and two boys. I reckon he had a wife but I don’t recollect seeing her. Ma suckled me; William May with me. Ely and Seley and Susie was his children. “I churned for mama in slavery. She tied a cloth around the top so no flies get in. I better hadn’t let no fly get in the churn. She take me out to a peach tree and learn me how to keep the flies outen the churn next time. “Mama was Dr. May’s cook. We et out the dishes but I don’t know how all of ’em done their eating. They eat at their houses. Dr. May had a good size bunch of hands, not a big crowd. We had straw beds. Made new ones every summer. In that country they didn’t ‘low you to beat yo’ hands up. I heard my folks say that more’n one time. “Dr. May come tole ’em it was freedom. They could get land and stay—all ‘at wanted to. All his old ones kept on wid him. They sharecropped and some of them got a third. I recollect him and worked for him. “The Ku Klux didn’t bother none...

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Slave Narrative of Enoch Beel

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Enoch Beel Age: 79 Location: Green Grove, Hazen, Arkansas “Yes maam I was born a slave, born in slavery times. I wer born in Hardman County, Tennessee. My own daddy was a Union soldier and my mama was a cook fer the mistress. We belonged to Miss Viney and Dr. Jim Mass. My daddy drawed a pension fer bein a soldier till he die. He went off to wait on some men he know. Then he met some men wanted him to join the army. They said then he get paid and get a bounty. No maam he never got a red cent. He come back broke as he went off. He say he turned loose soon as he could and mustered out and lef them right now. He had no time to ax em no questions. That what he said! We stayed on that place till I was big nuf to do a days work. We had no other place to go. There was plenty land and no stock. Houses to stay in got scarce. If a family had a place to stay at when that war ended he counted hisself lucky I tell you. Heap of black an white jes ramlin round through the woods an over the roads huntin a little to eat or a little sumpin to do. If...

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Biography of Wood Hurt

Wood Hurt, an alert and enterprising business man who since 1918 has been financially interested in the Muskogee Wholesale Grocery Company and is also identified with other business interests of importance which contribute to general progress and prosperity as well as to individual success, was born in Hazen, Arkansas, on the 16th of August, 1877, and is a son of Thomas Spencer and Nellie (Myers) Hurt. The father was a farmer, devoting his entire life to agricultural pursuits. The son was educated in the public schools and initiated his business career by securing a clerkship in a general store, in which he was employed for six years. He afterward engaged in the furniture business at Hazen, Arkansas, for a period of three years and in 1900 he removed to Oklahoma, establishing his home in McAlester, where he became a director of the Townsend Grocery Company. He was associated with that undertaking until 1904, when he sold his interest and became identified with the Hale-Halsell Grocery Company. In 1913 he turned his attention to the wholesale produce business in Muskogee and later consolidated the business with that of the Muskogee Wholesale Grocery Company in 1918. He is likewise a director of the Ratcliff-Sanders Company of Tulsa and in 1916 he established the Wood Hurt Motor Company, handling the Buick cars and the G. M. C. motor trucks. His judgment is...

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Sasser, Ella Mae

Ella Mae Sasser, Services Tomorrow Ella Mae Sasser, who had been in ill health for the past several weeks passed away Tuesday morning, March 13, 1973, at Wallowa Memorial Hospital. Following the death of her husband, Chester H. Sasser, on February 14th she had moved from the Joseph home to an apartment in Alpine Village. Mrs. Sasser was born July 22, 1905 in De Valls Bluff, Ark., the daughter of John and Minnie Buchanan. She had come to Wallowa County with her family 55 years ago. On June 4, 1922 she was married in Enterprise to Chester H. Sasser. She was a member of Silver Lake Rebekah Lodge 121 of Joseph and Eagle Cap VFW Auxiliary 4307 of Enterprise. Survivors include two daughters, Mrs. Glen (Wilda) Trump and Mrs. Robt. (Cherryl) Zacharias, both of Joseph; three sons, Wilford (Grant) of Wallowa, Earl Dean, Portland, and Ernest (Bunk) of Enterprise; a sister, Mrs. Darrel (Gertrude) Greenough of Lostine; two brothers, John E. Buchanan, New Plymouth, Ida., and Marion V. Buchanan, Clarkston, Wash.; and 14 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Memorial services will be held tomorrow (Friday) at 2 p.m. at the Bollman Chapel, Rev. Douglas Money will officiate and interment will follow in the Enterprise cemetery. Wallowa County Chieftain, Thursday March 15, 1973 Contributed by Dixie...

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Chitty, William Edward – Obituary

W. E. Chitty, Formerly of Pine Bluff, Lost Life in River—Helena, May 17–(Special)– The body of W. E. Chitty, age 60, who disappeared between the hours of 7 and 8 p.m. Tuesday, off the Chicago Mill and Lumber Corporation’s derrick boat, was found early this morning, near the bank of the river about a mile below where it is thought he stumbled from the boat and fell into the river. Chitty, prior to his moving to Helena about two months ago, had lived in West Helena where he had been employed as night watchman for the Chicago Mill and the Pekin Wood Products Co. plants. For the past two months he had been employed as a newspaper carrier. He had given this up last Sunday. William McWherter, operator of the derrick boat, stated that Chitty came to him about two weeks past and asked for permission to sleep on the boat, inasmuch as he had no funds to pay rent. This privilege was granted him. Last Tuesday evening he was found in a deep ravine beside the Yazoo and Mississippi Valley railroad incline, in an intoxicated condition. Two river men carried him to the derrick boat. Chitty was missed from the boat Tuesday night but it was thought he had left and gone up town. Later the matter was reported to the police and Friday a search was started....

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Prairie County, Arkansas Census

Prairie County, Arkansas was formed from Pulaski County in 1846. 1850 Prairie County, Arkansas Census Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Free 1850 Census Images (partially indexed) Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1850 Prairie County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Free 1850 Census Index Free 1850 Census Images Hosted at Census Guide 1850 U.S. Census Guide 1860 Prairie County, Arkansas Census Free 1860 Census Form for your Research Free 1860 Census Images and Index Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1860 Prairie County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Free 1860 Census Images Hosted at Census Guide 1860 U.S. Census Guide 1870 Prairie County, Arkansas Census Free 1870 Census Form for your Research Free 1870 Census Images and Index Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1870 Prairie County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Free 1870 Census Images Hosted at Census Guide 1870 U.S. Census Guide 1880 Prairie County, Arkansas Census Free 1880 Census Form for your Research Free 1880 Census Transcription Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1880 Prairie County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Free 1880 Census Images Hosted at Census Guide 1880 U.S. Census Guide 1890 Prairie County, Arkansas Census Free 1890 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1890 Veterans...

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