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Location: Pinal County AZ

Apache Indians

Apache Indians. Located in southern New Mexico and Arizona, western Texas, and southeastern Colorado, also ranging over much of northern Mexico. Together with the Navaho, the Apache constituted the western group of the southern division of the Athapascan linguistic stock.

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Anderson, Josephine Lois – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now La Grande, Oregon Josephine “Jo” Anderson, 83, of La Grande, died Monday at a local care center. A graveside service will begin at 2 p.m. Wednesday at the Grandview Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the Trinity Baptist Church. Daniels-Knopp Funeral, Cremation & Life Celebration Center is in charge of arrangements. A full obituary will be available later. The Observer – August 26, 2008 __________________________________________ Josephine Lois “Jo” Anderson, 83, of La Grande, died Aug. 25 at a local care center. A graveside service will begin at 2 p.m. today at Grandview Cemetery. Daniels-Knopp Funeral, Cremation & Life Celebration Center is in charge of arrangements. Jo was born June 23, 1925, to Daniel and Effie (Millican) Garinger in Omaha, Neb. She was educated in Colorado Springs and married West Anderson Nov. 11, 1943. They lived in various places and she owned and operated restaurants in Florence, Ariz., and in Oklahoma. In the late spring of 1974 the couple moved to La Grande. She worked various jobs. Her last, when she was in her 70s, was for Dave’s Grocery as the ice cream lady. Jo was a member of Trinity Baptist Church. The 700 Club and Billy Graham were a big part of her life. She enjoyed knitting, crocheting and was known as the “QVC Queen’’...

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Tarango, Manuel – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Baker City, Oregon Manuel Tarango, 80, of Baker City and a former longtime resident of Stanfield, Ariz., died Sept. 20, 2004, at St. Elizabeth Health Care Center. A memorial Mass for him will be celebrated at 2 p.m. Friday at the St. Elizabeth Health Care Center chapel, 3325 Pocahontas Road. The Rev. Robert C. Irwin will celebrate the Mass. Another memorial Mass will be celebrated Oct. 8 at Casa Grande, Ariz. Manuel was born on June 2, 1924, at Fort Davis, Texas, to Encarnacion and Alejandra Magallanes Tarango. Manuel was raised and educated on the family cattle ranch at Aldama, Chihuahua, Mexico. His family owned a store in Chihuahua, Chihuahua, where as a child he sold his eggs to a Chinese restaurant owner. When a terrible drought hit the region, Manuel and his brother Eliseo decided to come back to the United States. They took on many farm labor jobs before settling at Stanfield, Ariz., where they picked cotton by hand in a migrant camp. He met his wife of 53 years, Elena Morales, at Stanfield. There the two brothers raised their families together. Until his retirement, Manuel worked for Martin Talla Farms, Lewis Johnson and John Wayne’s Cattle Feedlots. He was “Tata” to everyone at Stanfield, especially to the several children he and Elena cared...

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Biography of John P. Clum

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John P. Clum, of San Bernardino, was born in Claverack, Columbia County, New York, in 1851, and his childhood and youth were passed on the banks of the historic Hudson. At the age of nineteen he graduated at the Hudson River Institute, and entered the freshman class of Rutger’s College, New Brunswick, New Jersey. After completing the first year and creditably passing all the examinations, adverse fortune compelled him to leave college, and in 1871 he entered the meteorological service of the United States Government. Having taken a course in meteorology and signaling, he was ordered to Santa Fe, New Mexico, and there opened a station for meteorological observations in November 1871. He was honored with the appointment as delegate to the Presbyterian General Assembly, held at Baltimore in 1873, and at St. Louis in 1874. On February 26, 1874, he was appointed Indian Agent of the Apaches at San Carlos, Arizona, and discharged the difficult duties of the office with remarkable fidelity and efficiency, and to the great satisfaction of the citizens of Arizona and Colorado. February 26, 1876, Mr. Clum resigned the agency, but finally, at the urgent request of the department, withdrew his resignation in October following. He resigned again in March, 1877, and left the agency July 1, 1877. In November 1876,...

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Pinal County, Arizona Census Records

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Pinal County was formed in 1875 from Pima and Yavapai Counties. Pima County, Arizona Census Records Yavapai County, Arizona Census Records 1880 Pinal County, Arizona Census Free 1880 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1880 Pinal County, Census Index 1880 Pinal County, Census Images $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1880 U.S. Census Guide 1890 Pinal County, Arizona Census Free 1890 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1890 Veterans Schedule $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1890 U.S. Census Guide 1900 Pinal County, Arizona Census Free 1900 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1900 Pinal County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1900 U.S. Census Guide 1910 Pinal County, Arizona Census Free 1910 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1910 Pinal County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1910 U.S. Census Guide 1920 Pinal County, Arizona Census Free 1920 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1920 Pinal County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1920 U.S. Census Guide 1930 Pinal County, Arizona Census Free 1930 Census Form for your...

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Pinal County, Arizona Cemetery Records

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Old Mammoth Cemetery (hosted at Pinal County, Arizona Tombstone Transcription Project) Hosted at the Arizona Gravestone Project. Adamsville Cemetery Bates Canyon Cemetery Butte View Cemetery Dudleyville Cemetery Eloy Memorial Park Cemetery Fairview Cemetery Florence Cemetery Kearny Memorial Cemetery Kelvin Cemetery Kelvin Town Site Cemetery Mammoth (Old) Cemetery Mammoth Valley View Cemetery Mt. View/Casa Grande Cemetery Pinal Cemetery Ray Memorial Cemetery Ripsey Wash (A-Diamond Ranch) Cemetery Sasco Cemetery Silver King Cemetery Superior Cemetery Town of Florence Cemetery Troy Townsite Cemetery V S Ranch Cemetery Valley Memorial Park Cemetery Weaver Pioneer Cemetery Following cemeteries hosted at Interment: Valley Memorial Park Cemetery Valley View...

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Calder, Viola M. Lucas Mrs. – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Baker City, Oregon Viola M. Calder, 90, a longtime Baker City resident, died March 17, 2002, at Troutdale from complication of breast cancer. A celebration of Viola’s life will be Tuesday at 11 a.m. at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 2625 Hugest Lane. Ernie Collard of the 1st Ward will conduct the services. Interment will follow at Mount Hope Cemetery. Visitations will be from today until 7 p.m. at the Coles Funeral Home, 1950 Place St. Viola was born April 5, 1911, in Sumpter to Andrew and Libby Lucas. She was the third daughter in a family of three girls. She was raised in Sumpter Valley and spent summers at the family ranch and winters in Sumpter. Her family moved to Baker City when she was a teenager, and she graduated from Baker High School. As a child she helped out on the ranch and enjoyed cooking. Desserts were her specialty. As years went by her reputation grew and no visitor left her home without their sweet tooth being satisfied. She married Clarence L. Calder, her high school sweetheart, on Sept. 6, 1933, and their marriage was solemnized in the Idaho Falls Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. They had two children: a son, Clarence A. Calder, and a...

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Biography of Peter Rainsford Brady

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Among the early pioneers of Arizona, none bore a more prominent part in its development than Peter Rainsford Brady. He came, on his paternal side, from good old Irish stock. His mother, Anna Rainsford, was from Virginia. He was born in Georgetown, District of Columbia, August 4th, 1825; received his education, in part, at the Georgetown College, later entering the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, from which he was graduated about the year 1&44. After cruising around the Mediterranean Sea in the United States vessel “Plymouth,” he resigned from the navy, and left his home October 26th, 1846, for San Antonio, Texas, where he enlisted as a Lieutenant in the Texas Hangers, and served with distinction in the Mexican “War. After the war Mr. Brady joined a surveying party under Colonel Andrew B. Gray, who made a survey from Marshall, Texas, to El Paso; thence across the country to Tubac and from the latter point made branch surveys, one to Port Lobos on the Gulf of California, and the other to Fort Yuma and San Diego. Mr. Brady served as a captain on this expedition, and was prominent in many Indian fights. When the work was completed, the company disbanded at San Francisco. Mr. Brady was of an adventurous spirit, and in his younger life preferred...

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Biography of Captain Thomas Jonathan Jeffords

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Captain Thomas Jonathan Jeffords was born in Chautauqua County, New York, in 1832. He laid out the road from Leavenworth, Kansas, to Denver, in 1858. In the fall of 1859 he came to Taos, New Mexico, and wintered in Taos. The following spring he went into the San Juan Mountains to prospect and mine. In 1862 he carried dispatches from Fort Thorn to General Carleton at Tucson. At that time, he was on the payroll of the United States Government as a scout, and piloted the advance companies of the California Column into New Mexico, to old Fort Thorn near the Rio Grande near Las Cruces. He is said to have taken part in the battle of Val Verde and the other engagements which resulted in the expulsion of the Confederates from New Mexico. In 1867 Captain Jeffords made the personal acquaintance of Cochise, who had been very active against all Americans and Mexicans. Of this meeting, Captain Jeffords said: “He had killed twenty-one men to my knowledge, fourteen of whom were in my employ. I made up my mind that I wanted to see him. I located one of his Indians and a camp where he came personally. In the meantime, I had acquired a smattering knowledge of the Indian language, having been an Indian...

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Biography of Samuel Hughes

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Samuel Hughes, probably the oldest pioneer Arizonan now living, was born in Wales, British Isles, August 28th, 1829. In 1837 his father settled in Pennsylvania, where Mr. Hughes lived up to 1848, when he became a cabin boy on the Mississippi River, which vocation he followed until 1850, at which time he came to California overland from St. Louis. His first mining was done in Hangtown, California. In 1851 he went to Yreka, California. In 1852 he crossed the mountains to Rogue River Valley in Oregon, where he was one of the first to discover Rich Gulch at Jacksonville. In 1853 he kept Cole station at the foot of the Siskiyou Mountains, and remained there until 1856, when he returned to the Shasta Valley, and soon afterwards became interested in the stock business. In 1857 he was compelled to leave California for the milder climate of Arizona, being, at that time, in the last stages of tuberculosis. He started with a party from Yreka in that year. At Yuma it seemed that his lease of life had apparently expired, with no hope of renewal, but after a few days’ rest, the sick man determined to make one more effort to reach his destination, and started again with the party. At Maricopa Wells, about four miles east...

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