Location: Pike County MO

Biography of John W. Jacks

The value of the local newspaper in the upbuilding of the best interests of any community is universally conceded. The rule is that good papers are found in good towns, inferior journals in towns of stunted growth and uncertain future. It is not so much a matter of size as excellence and of adaptability to the needs of its locality. These conditions given, in an appreciative and progressive community, the size of the paper will take care of itself in a way mutually satisfactory to publishers and patrons. Montgomery City is fortunate in having the Standard as its local instrument. This paper is owned, edited and published by John W. Jacks and is conducted upon only the highest and most honorable principles. John W. Jacks was born five miles north of Paris, in Monroe county, Missouri, on the 1st of September, 1845, a son of John Richmond Jacks. His father was born to Kentucky in 1815 and came with his parents to Missouri when twelve years of age. The first pair of shoes John R. Jacks ever owned he made himself. In Missouri he engaged in farming and the mercantile business and was a prominent man in the community in which he resided. He was the first marshal of the Court of Common Pleas of Sturgeon, Boone county, and was a man of the highest integrity and personal worth....

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Biography of Calvin Wilson

CALVIN WILSON. Douglas County is conspicuous for its magnificent farms that are faultless in way of management and the order in which they are kept. No one is to be more complimented on the perfect method and order with which their agricultural affairs are conducted than Calvin Wilson, who has made his home in this county for the past twenty-four years. Like other representative citizens of this section he is a native Tennessean, his birth occurring in Campbell County, January 27, 1843. His parents, Benjamin and Oma (Ridenhauer) Wilson, were natives of Tennessee. They emigrated to Missouri in 1844 and there the mother’s death occurred the same year. Afterward the father returned with our subject to Tennessee, and in that State and Kentucky the latter received his early schooling. Later he attended school in Indiana. In the year 1862 he enlisted in Company E, Sixty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry and served from August 12 of that year until July 9, 1865, serving in the same company and regiment all the time. Some of the important battles in which he engaged were Knoxville, Resaca, Atlanta, Franklin and Nashville. He was in many minor engagements and numerous skirmishes. During service he was wounded in the right leg, was unfit for duty for some time, and still has a slight halt in his gait from the effects of it. After being discharged at...

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Biography of Frank F. Fletcher

Frank F. Fletcher is the only architect practicing the profession exclusively at Independence. He has a long and successful record as a builder and was active as a contractor until an unfortunate injury obliged him to desist. He has since followed the profession of architect and has built up a very large clientele. He was born in Louisiana, Missouri, September 19, 1870. His maternal grandfather was William Kling, who was born in Holland in 1800 and was a horticulturist. On coming to America he settled in Louisiana, Missouri, in 1818. Peter R. Fletcher, father of Frank F., was born in Hull, England, in 1827. As a young man he served two years in the British army. When about twenty years of age he came to the United States and located at Louisiana, Missouri. As a building contractor he erected courthouses and other public buildings in Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee and Texas. It was while engaged in the building of a courthouse at Denton, Texas, that he was killed in a railroad accident. He died at Dallas, Texas, in 1874. He was a republican, a Mason, and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Peter R. Fletcher married Margaret Kling, who was born at Louisiana, Missouri, in 1835, and died there in 1870. Her children were: William, who is a contractor and builder at Corpus Christi, Texas; Annie, wife of...

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Biography of C. F. Reid

C. F. Reid, who has devoted much of his life to public service, is now acceptably filling the office of county treasurer and his thorough reliability and efficiency have won for him the confidence and respect of his fellow townsmen, who have found him faithful to every trust reposed in him. He was born in Bowling Green, Pike county, Missouri, and his parents were Alexander Finley and Anna M. (Blaine) Reid, the former a native of Kentucky, while the latter was born in Missouri. The ancestors of the subject of this review in both the paternal and maternal lines participated in the Revolutionary war and his mother’s people originally settled in Virginia, whence they later removed to Missouri, the first brick hotel in Bowling Green, that state, having been erected by a member of the family. During the infancy of C. F. Reid his parents went to Mexico, Missouri, and there the father passed away in 1902. The mother is still a resident of that city, having reached the advanced age of eighty years. C. F. Reid acquired his education in the grammar and high schools of Mexico, Missouri, and after completing his studies became connected with mercantile interests at Warrenton, that state. He was first called to public office in 1905, serving as deputy sheriff of Warren County, Missouri, until 1907, as treasurer from 1907 until 1913, when...

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Phelps, Mary Smith – Obituary

Mrs. Mary Phelps, a resident of Ellensburg from 1884 to 1945, died recently [January 16, 1951] in Everett, where she has lived for the past five years. She was born in Pike County, Missouri, in 1867. Surviving are three sons, Gilbert of Everett, Tracy of Chelan, and Odie Phelps of Seattle; a sister, Mrs. Ella Wilson of Everett, and a brother, Sherman Smith, of Ellensburg. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. on Friday at the Honeycutt-Evenson Chapel, with Rev. Dan Rueb officiating. Interment will follow at the IOOF cemetery here. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Biography of Hon. John Burnett

HON. JOHN BURNETT. – Among the prominent self-made men of Oregon is the subject of this sketch. He was born in Pike county, Missouri, on the 4th of July, 1831. He lost his father at the age of fifteen, and was turned out in the world to fight his way as best he might. He first engaged as an errand boy in a store, but, becoming tired of the confinement, at the end of a year hired out to work on a flat-boat on the Mississippi, boating wood to St. Louis. His early education was obtained in the common schools of the country; and, though his opportunities were limited, he laid the foundation upon which he, in after life, built a sound practical education. In the spring of 1849, there being great excitement about the gold discoveries in California and a general rush to the mines, he accepted an outfit form a relative, and though under eighteen years old started “the plains across” to seek his fortune in the new El Dorado. He arrived in Sacramento on the 10th of September with just one five-franc piece in his pocket. During the greater part of the time from that date on he was engaged in mining and dealing in cattle, until the spring of 1858, when he came to Oregon and settled in Benton county, where he has resided since....

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Biography of Col. John Colgate Bell

COL. JOHN COLGATE BELL. – Colonel Bell, enjoying a wide reputation from Southern Oregon to Idaho, and back again to the Pacific seashore throughout the state in which he has successively lived and made a multitude of personal acquaintances, merits a special recognition on account of his public services in official relations and in the early Indian wars of Southern Oregon. He was born at Sterling, Kentucky, February 24, 1814. His parents were from Virginia; and among his ancestors were those distinguished in the early history of the nation, his father having served with General Harrison in the war of 1812. The young man received his education at the Mount Sterling Academy, and began business at his native town in the dry-goods store of David Herren. In 1834, he began his western career by removing with his father to Missouri, engaging with him in mercantile business at Clarksville, Pike county. Eight years later he entered into business on his own account at Weston, and in 1845 was married to Miss Sarah E., daughter of General Thompson Ward, of honorable fame in the Mexican war. In 1847 he was engaged with the General in organizing the regiments of Donovan and Price and the battalion of Major Powell sent to new Fort Kearney on the plains for the protection of emigrants. It was in these operations that he received his military...

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Biography of Herbert J. Corwine

Herbert J. Corwine has long been one of Topeka’s most popular citizens, was formerly pastor of the Third Christian Church of that city, and in 1916 he became widely known all over the First Congressional District as democratic candidate for Congress, running in opposition to Congressman Anthony of Leavenworth. To elect a democrat from this district would be to perform a miracle in politics, but Mr. Corwine made a very strong bid for popular support and secured a handsome aggregate of votes, thought impartial observers would have conceded the election of his republican opponent before the ballots were counted. Mr. Corwine was by far the strongest candidate of his party at the primaries in August, 1916, and particularly in those counties where he was personally known he secured a large number of normally republican votes. Mr. Corwine was born in Pike County, Missouri, at the Town of Frankfort, September 25, 1876. His is a very interesting ancestry. He is a son of John Brooks Corwine, who was born in Mason County, Kentucky, in 1841, and for more than forty years was one of the ablest ministers of the Christian Church. He did his first work as a pastor in Macoupin County, Illinois. He also organized the First Christian Church at Bowling Green, Missouri, and one of its charter members was the distinguished Missouri and national statesman, Champ Clark. Thereafter...

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Biographical Sketch of Randall Alexander

Randall Alexander, breeder and shipper of Poland-China swine, Charleston; about ten years ago this gentleman, in company with S. M. Shepard, made his first start in the introduction and breeding of thorough-bred swine in Coles Co. After having experimented thoroughly with the various breeds of hogs, they became convinced that the Poland-China possessed all the requisites of size, docility, fertility, early maturity, aptitude for taking on flesh, and great constitutional vigor, necessary to render it pre-eminently the hog for the farmer. From a small beginning, the business has grown to its present proportions. Mr. Alexander is now one of the most prominent breeders in the State; his trade extends to every part of the country, to the Pacific Coast, Canada, the Southern States, etc.; his farm, near Charleston, possesses all the advantages of a perfect hog farm, such as pure running water, sheltered location, shade, range, etc. Mr. Alexander was born in Madison, Jefferson Co., Ind., Aug. 5, 1842; when about 10 years old, he removed with his parents to Tipton Co., Ind.; at 14, he left home, and going to Louisiana, Mo., engaged as a clerk in a dry goods store. In 1861, he went to Tuscola, Douglas Co., Ill., and clerked one year; he then, with Mr. Robert Beech, built the Beech House, the finest hotel on the Illinois Central Railroad, from Chicago to Cairo; after running...

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Biography of Rev. William Jackson Haydon

Rev. Haydon is the son of Jarvis and Harriet Ann (Mitchell) Haydon, and was born near Lynchburg, Virginia, June 8th, 1835. His father (Jarvis) was born in the same State, February 1st, 1797, and died there February 10th, 1852. His mother was a daughter of John Mitchell, and was born in Amherst county, Virginia, April 18th, 1805. She was married at sixteen years old, and died August 7th, 1850. William Jackson Haydon was the third born in a family of six children, all but two of whom are dead. The other surviving one, Alexander, still lives in Virginia, engaged in railroading. The subject of this sketch received his education at Lynchburg, and Lewisburg, West Virginia, and at an early age professed religion and joined the Old School Presbyterian church. After leaving school Mr. Haydon engaged in the mercantile business at Lewisburg, and was afterwards engaged in teaching. He came to Missouri in the spring, of 1860, landing at Louisiana, where he remained for some time engaged in teaching in Pike county. Subsequently he was engaged in merchandising in Mexico, Missouri, for about five years. Although the war was raging, Mr. Haydon’s zeal in the Christian cause would not allow him to remain idle and he promptly and earnestly engaged in church and Sabbath schoolwork. He was elected a deacon in the church, and his devotion to church work was...

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