Location: Pawhuska Oklahoma

Biographical Sketch of Thomas Rogers

(See Grant and Downing)-Thomas Lewis, son of Thomas Lewis and Nancy C. (Martin) Rogers, was born near Pawhuska, September 2, 1885. He was educated in that city. He married in 1917 at Joplin, Missouri, Bessie Barrett. He is the father of Thomas Lewis, born July 28, 1911; and Nancy Rogers, born April 24, 1914. Mr. Rogers is a member of the Christian church, and a merchant at...

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Biography of George B. Keeler

There is no man who has taken more active and helpful part in the development of Bartlesville and Washington county than George B. Keeler. He has resided in this section of the state from early pioneer times and was adopted into the Cherokee tribe in 1872. He understands the sign language of all of the Indian tribes and speaks the Osage tongue. He has been in a way a connecting link between the Indian life and customs of an early day and the modern civilization and progress. His business activity has covered a wide scope, leading directly to the improvement, settlement and up building of this section of the country, where he has lived from pioneer times, Nelson F. Carr being the only white man who has resided in this part of the state for a longer period. Mr. Keeler came to the southwest from Illinois, his birth having occurred at Hennepin, Putnam county, February 7, 1850. His father, Alson Keeler, was a native of Kyler, Courtland county, New York, and in an early day removed to Illinois, where he resided until 1856. He had followed merchandising in the quaint old town of Hennepin. on the Illinois river, but when his son, George, was a lad of six years he removed with his family to Vernon county, Wisconsin, where he remained for about a decade, devoting three or four...

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Biography of S. B. Ward

S. B. Ward, a pioneer farmer and stock raiser of Oklahoma residing near Ramona, in Washington county, is conducting his operations on an extensive scale and in the management of his business interests he displays marked executive ability, firm determination and sound judgment. A native of West Virginia, he was born January 21, 1860, and his parents, Simon and Savannah (Hammer) Ward, were also born in that state. In 1881 they removed to Missouri, settling near Appleton City, where the father engaged in farming and in that year he planted five hundred acres to corn which averaged between sixty and seventy bushels to the acre. In 1890 he came to Indian Territory, settling on a farm belonging to Chief Bluejacket, in Rogers county, and this property lie continued to cultivate and improve until his demise, which occurred in 1902, while the mother passed away in 1910. In the common schools of West Virginia, S. B. Ward acquired his education and in 1881, when a young man of twenty-one years, be accompanied his parents on their removal to Missouri, where he followed agricultural pursuits independently until 1882. In 1887 he came to Indian Territory and for a year operated the F. M. Crowell place, situated on the line of the Frisco Railroad, between Vinita and Afton, while during the following year he cultivated land on Sabin creek, east of Vinita....

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Biography of H. L. Cox

H. L. Cox. For some of its best citizenship, Southeastern Kansas is indebted to the New England states. The men who have made their way from the states bordering on the Atlantic Coast who have journeyed across the country to the land of the sunflower, have displayed in their citizenship and their characters the same sterling qualities of their sturdy forbears, who, like them, braved a new and untried section, and planted the seeds that brought forth a fine civilization. Of the men of Chautauqua County who lay claim to New England birth, one who had gained success in this section is H. L. Cox, of Cedar Vale, merchant and oil producer and one of his community’s energetic and progressive citizens. While born in New England, he is essentially a Kansan, as he was but one and one-half years old when he came with his parents to this state, but his long line of New England ancestry is typical of the stock that had given to the West some of its best men. Mr. Cox was born at Manchester, New Hampshire, May 12, 1869, and is a son of L. M. and Abbie M. (Andrews) Cox. The family traces its ancestry back to early colonial times, when the first emigrant came from England and settled in Massachusetts, in which state was born the grandfather of H. L. Cox, Mason...

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Biography of Mrs. Anna Parks

Mrs. Anna Parks, a native daughter of Oklahoma and a member of one of the old and prominent families of the state, is the owner of a valuable farm near Bartlesville and is a most capable business woman, displaying marked executive ability, foresight and enterprise in the management of her interests. She was born on the present site of Bartlesville, her parents being John and Jennie (Downing) Lovelady, the former a native of Germany, while the latter was born in Indian Territory and was of Cherokee extraction. In 1860 the maternal grandfather, Jesse Thompson, settled near the present location of Bartlesville, becoming the owner of a large tract of land which he developed and improved. He was one of the most prominent men of his day, serving on the Cherokee council at the time the government transferred the Osage from Kansas to Indian Territory, and he also assisted in making the treaty for the land for both the Osage’ and Delaware tribes. John Lovelady came to the United States as a youth and resided for a time in New York. In 1893 he made his way to Indian Territory, where he acquired land, becoming one of the well known settlers of the region. Mr. and Mrs. Lovelady reared three daughters: Susie and Mary, who were Anna’s half sisters, and are both deceased; and Anna, now Mrs. Parks. The last...

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