Location: Owen County IN

Illinois Burial Customs

The term Illinois Indians as used by some early writers was intended to include the various Algonquian tribes, encountered in the “Illinois country,” in addition to those usually recognized as forming the Illinois confederacy. Thus, in the following quotation from Joutel will be found a reference to the Chahouanous – i. e., Shawnee – as being of the Islinois, and in the same note Accancea referred to the Quapaw, a Siouan tribe living on the right bank of the Mississippi, not far north of the mouth of the Arkansas. Describing the burial customs of the Illinois, as witnessed by him during the latter years of the seventeenth century, Joutel wrote: ” They pay a Respect to their Dead, as appears by their special Care of burying them, and even of putting into lofty Coffins the Bodies of such as are considerable among them, as their Chiefs and others, which is also practised among the Accancea’s, but they differ in this Particular, that the Accancea’s weep and make their Complaints for some Days, where as the Chahoaanous, and other People of the Islinois Nation do just the Contrary; for when any of them die, they wrap them up in Skins, and then put them into Coffins made of the Barks of Trees, then sing and dance about them for twenty four Hours. Those Dancers take Care to tie Calabashes, or...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Jackson A. Bartlett

This well known and representative business man of the town of Drewsey has a fine hotel, where he does a thriving business and also a large livery and feed stable, being a man of excellent capabilities and one of the prominent figures in this part of Harney county. He was born in Owen county, Indiana, on August 31, 1847, the son of James and Sarah (Alexander) Bartlett. He was reared on a farm and gained his education from the public schools of the vicinity and when he heard the call for troops in the times of fratricidal strife he enlisted in the One Hundred and Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Company B. He was largely on post puty, being in Louisville, Kentucky; Nashville, Tennessee; and Decatur, Alabama. The date of his enlistment was February 14, 1865, and his honorable discharge occurred in October, 1865. He at once returned to his home in Indiana. In 1868 he migrated to Scotland county, Missouri, and there on December 25, 1870, occurred his marriage with Miss Arminta J., daughter of William and Margaret Myers. He followed farming there until 1887, and then with his family of wife and seven children he made the trip across the country to Union county, Oregon. The following year he came to the agency, in the vicinity of Beulah, Malheur county, entered a homestead, improved it and settled to...

Read More

Biography of Z. A. Johnson

It is generally considered by those in the habit of super-ficial thinking that the history of so-called great men only is worthy of preservation, and that little merit exists among the masses to call forth the praise of the historian or the cheers and appreciation of mankind. A greater mistake was never made. No man is great in all things,and very few are great in many things. Many, by a lucky stroke, achieve lasting fame, who before that had no reputation beyond the limits of their neighborhood. It is not a history of the lucky stroke which benefits humanity most, but the long study and effort which made the lucky stroke possible. It is the preliminary work-the method -that serves as a guide for the success of others. Thus it appears that the lives of the masses out of which come the men who control the world, will furnish the grandest, truest lesson for the benefit of humanity. Among the successful and popular business men of Ozark, stands Z. A. Johnson, who is a member of the well-known grocery establishment of Wolff & Johnson. He was originally from the Hoosier State, born in Owen County February 16, 1851, and is a son of J. S.and Hannah (Dean) Johnson, natives of Indiana and Ohio, respectively. His grandparents on both sides came originally from Virginia, where they were among the prominent...

Read More

Biography of William R. Zook

William R. Zook. The life of William B. Zook had embraced a wide range of experiences and covered a period of more than forty-seven years in Western Kansas. He was one of those whose labor lent dignity and stability to unsettled and undeveloped concitions, and whose faith in the future was readily communicated to his associates among the early settlers. In the period following the Civil war, in which he had fought as a soldier of the Union, he cast his fortunes among the pioneers of the frontier, and after many hardships and vicissitudes finally emerged triumphant, the owner of a competence that is allowing him to pass his declining years in the cornfort and peace to which his long years of labor entitle him. William R. Zook, retired citizen of Cuba, was born in the State of Indiana February 4, 1846. He was educated in that state and in Missouri, to which latter he was taken by his parents as a lad of nine years, and was reared as a farmer, a vocation which he was following when the Civil war came on. He was but ten days past his seventeenth birthday when he became a soldier of the Union, enlisting February 14, 1863, in Company M, Second Nebraska Volunteer Cavalry, which was attached to the Western Army and engaged in service with the hostile Indians on the...

Read More

Thomas Jefferson Todd of Nebraska

Thomas Jefferson Todd6, (Caleb5, Gideon4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born March 11, 1803, at Fairfield, Herkimer County, N. Y., died Aug. 10, 1880, at Plattsmouth, Neb., married May 12, 1830, Mary Smith at Kiantone, Chautauqua County, N. Y. In the year 1832, they removed to Jamestown, N. Y.; in 1836 they went to Geauga County, Ohio; thence in 1839 to Carrol County, Ohio; then in 1841 they went to De Wittville, N. Y., to the farm originally owned by Caleb Todd and which was bought by him from the Holland Land Company, and which farm is now owned by Chautauqua County and is occupied as a County Poor Farm. In 1844, they removed to Monroe County, Ohio; thence in 1847 to Owen County, Ind., where he bought 80 acres of old growth timber land, which was cleared off by his sons Frederick P. and Ami B. Todd. While he was living in Indiana, he was generally engaged in erecting large hotels and mills for the manufacture of flour. He practiced medicine three years while residing in Monroe County, Ohio. In the year 1857, he moved with two ox teams across the States to Nebraska, having been fifty-five days in making the journey, landing on the East bank of the Missouri River, May 25, 1857, soon crossing over to the west bank in the territory of Nebraska. Otoe Indians were still...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Jacob Ernst

Jacob Ernst, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Humbolt; the subject of this sketch was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, March 30, 1839. He married Miss Julia Anna Joose Aug. 16, 1861 she was born in Baden, Germany, June 20, 1844; they had nine children, eight living, viz., George A., John M., Flora May, Mary A., Harry D., Willis E., Clarence and Jacob E.; Charlie died June 4, 1866. He lived in Germany about fifteen years, when he came to the United States and settled in Meadville, Penn., where he lived until 1855; he then moved to Owen Co., Ind.; thence to Hendricks Co., and, in 1857, he came to Coles Co., Ill.; he had visited here in 1856; in March, 1867, he came to his present place, and has lived here since. He has held the office of School Director several terms, and is at present Commissioner of Highways in this township; he owns 159 acres in this township, which he has earned by his own labor and...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Granville F. Raper

Granville F. Raper, farmer; P. O. Arcola; is a native of Owen Co., Ind., where he was born Jan. 28, 1836. He married Miss Mary H. Roberts Aug. 5, 1855; she was born in Greene Co., Ind., Sept. 13, 1832; they had nine children, six living, viz., James A., California J., Laura S., William O., Albert H. and Granville S. He lived twenty-one years in Indiana, when he moved to Hancock Co., Ill., and engaged in farming; remaining there three years, he returned to his old home in Indiana and lived there two years; he then came to Illinois and settled in Douglas Co., near Tuscola, where he remained three years; he then came to Coles Co. and settled in Humbolt Tp., and engaged in farming, which he continued for four years, when he moved to the village of Milton, now Humbolt, and engaged in the grocery business, remaining one year; he then came to Seven Hickory and settled on a farm near the plank road, where he lived one year; he then came to his present place, and has lived here since; he owns 160 acres, which he has earned entirely by his own labor and management. His parents were Berry and Mrs. Mary Evans Raper; they were natives of Indiana and Kentucky; they were married in Indiana, where his father died Jan. 20, 1837; his mother married...

Read More

Biography of John W. Simpson

John W. Simpson. The people of the Town of Tescott in Ottawa County recognize in John W. Simpson the man who more than any other individual had been identified with the growth and upbuilding of the community, and they have confirmed their choice of him as a natural leader by keeping him in the office of mayor continually for twelve successive terms, so that he is at once the first and last and only mayor the village had ever had. Mr. Simpson was born in Owen County, Indiana, March 26, 1854, and is of old Virginia colonial stock. His father, John Simpson, was born in Virginia in 1817. In 1821 his father died and in 1829 his mother passed away, so that at the age of twelve years he was left an orphan. He soon went to Ohio, where he followed farming and where he married, and in 1847 he migrated to Owen County, Indiana, and as a pioneer he pre-empted a tract of land and paid $1.25 an acre. He cut down the timber, built a log cabin and went through all the trials and vicissitudes of an early settler. He was a man of substantial prominence in the community for many years and died there in 1897. In politics he was a republican. John Simpson married Rhoda Barnes, who was born at Zanesville, Ohio, in 1819, and...

Read More

Biography of W. K. Payne

W. K. Payne, retired, Ashmore; although not an early settler of Coles Co., is one of the pioneers in the adjoining county of Edgar, where he was a prominent citizen for forty-six years. He was born in Shelby Co., Ky., May 17, 1807, and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Wright) Payne, both natives of Kentucky and descendants of old Virginia families. His early education was limited to such as the schools of that region afforded. In 1822, his father removed with his family to Owen Co., Ind. In 1831, Mr. Payne came to Edgar Co., and engaged in the mercantile business in Grand View; he built a store in that place, and after his marriage occupied it both as a store and dwelling; he afterward erected a substantial store and a fine residence on the same spot; both of these were recently destroyed by fire. Mr. Payne continued in the mercantile business in Grand View for thirty-five years, during which time he held the office of Postmaster for twelve years. In 1866, he retired from active business, and in October, 1877, he removed to Ashmore, where he now lives in the quiet enjoyment of the results of a long and successful business life. He was married Jan. 2, 1834, to Miss Matilda Wampler, who was born in Steubenville, Jefferson Co., Ohio, July 22, 1815; she is a...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of George Steigman

George Steigman, Charleston, of the firm of Steigman, Wilson & Co., proprietor of the Charleston Pork-Packing Houses; was born in Dimboch, County of Weinsberg, Kingdom of Wurtemberg, Germany, Aug. 5, 1827; he was raised on a farm, and, in 1853, came to the United States, spent one year in Meadville, Crawford Co., Penn., and coming thence to Owen Co., Ind., where he followed farming year; in 1855, he came to Charleston and engaged in farming, which he continued eight years; he then kept a meat-market until 1871, when he revisited his native country, spending eight months; returning, he followed the hardware and lumber business four years; in August, 1878, he became one of the proprietors of the Charleston Pork-Packing Houses, a full description of which will be found in the historical part of this work. Mr. Steigman has been prosperous in business, and is one of the solid men of the community, owning two farms in the county besides his property in town; he has served three terms as a member of the City Council, and has been City Treasurer for the past three years. He was married Feb. 26, 1854, to Miss Rosina Ernst, of Wurtemberg, Germany; they have had one child -John C., born Dec. 3, 1854, and died March 22,...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest