Select Page

Location: Oregon City Oregon

Diehl, Marilyn Marie Bond Mrs. – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Baker City, Baker County, Oregon Marilyn Marie Diehl, 66, of Pendleton, a former Baker City resident, died Dec. 31, 2005, at Willowbrook Terrace in Pendleton. Her funeral will be scheduled later in Baker City. Disposition was by cremation. Mrs. Diehl was born on June 10, 1939, at Baker City to John and Vera Speelman Bond. She attended Baker High School and was a graduate of Eastern Oregon State College at La Grande (now Eastern Oregon University). She was an elementary school teacher at Union and Oregon City. Her hobbies included music, drawing and arts and crafts. She was a member of the United Methodist Church. Survivors include her daughter, Susan Diehl of Vancouver, Wash.; sons, Glen of Pendleton and Joe Diehl of Alaska; her mother, Vera Bond of Baker City; sisters, Kathryn Eidson of Houston and Gail Sorter of Myrtle Creek; her brother, Ken Bond of Forest Grove; and four grandchildren. Burns Mortuary of Pendleton was in charge of arrangements. Used with permission from: Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, January 13, 2006 Transcribed by: Belva...

Read More

Biography of J. T. Hunsaker

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now J.T. HUNSAKER. – This pioneer of 1846, one of the most substantial and upright men of one state, who has borne his full share of the burden and heat of the day in building up Oregon, was even from the first upon the advanced wave of American civilization, having been born at Jonesboro, Illinois, in 1818, and having assisted in laying the foundations of that giant state of the old West. He began domestic life in 1837, marrying Miss Emily Collins of the same state, and devoting his energies to the development of a farm. He was moved, however, by the attractions of the more distant West, and in 1846 joined the train of Captain Keith bound for the then almost fabulous Oregon. The company was found to be so large as to travel best in detachments; and the journey was safely performed across the mountains and deserts, and happily ended at Oregon City September 13th. Mr. Hunsaker located his first claim on the Molalla, and raised a crop in 1847, but soon abandoned this site for another at Scappoose, where, in addition to agriculture, he had the opportunity to engage in lumbering. In 1849 he sold the mill erected there, and resided a short time at Oregon City, but soon established a more permanent business...

Read More

Biography of John Marshall McCall

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now JOHN MARSHALL McCALL. – Among the substantial and favorably known residents of Southern Oregon, none have occupied a more useful place in the upbuilding of the state since the days of its infancy than the gentleman whose name is the heading of this brief memoir. His is one of those aggressive, go ahead dispositions that is an example of that time-honored adage, that “God helps those who help themselves;” and his whole life has bristled with instances of this belief. A man of strong convictions and honest prejudices, scorning hypocrisy in all things and in his dealings with friend, foe or the world at large, all his actions are guided by fairness, honesty and affability. Being of such a nature, success has come to him, and also a popularity among those who have had the good fortune to become acquainted with him. By birth he is a Pennsylvanian, having been born in Washington county in that state on January 15, 1825. In 1840 he became with his parents a pioneer to the then territory of Iowa, settling in Louisa county. From thence he emigrated “the plains across,” via the ox-team route to Oregon. His headquarters during the first winter after his arrival was at the old capital, Oregon City. From there he made excursions to different...

Read More

Biography of Mrs. Julia A. McCarver

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now MRS. JULIA A. McCARVER. – Julia A. McCoy was born November 19, 1825, in St. Charles county, Missouri. Her parents died before she was three years old; and she was brought up by her grandfather and grandmother. At an early age she was married to Garrett Buckalew, and thereafter lived in the State of Illinois until the spring of 1847, when, with her husband and two children, and the families of eighteen neighbors, she started across the plains for Oregon. At St. Joseph, Missouri, they joined a host of other emigrants, the combined party including ninety families, who continued their journey to its destination under the guidance and command of Captain Joel Palmer, who had already twice crossed the continent, and was then after his family. Mrs. Buckalew lost her youngest child on the plains; and, while crossing the Blue Mountains in Eastern Oregon, her husband contracted a cold from which he died in a few days at Philip Foster’s place on the western slope of the Cascade Mountains. In 1848 she married general M.M. McCarver, who had crossed the plains in 1843, and whose letters to other friends in Illinois induced the Buckalews to come to Oregon. They took a Donation claim near Oregon City, the then chief town of the North Pacific region, where...

Read More

Biography of Gen. Morton Mathew McCarver

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now GEN. MORTON MATHEW McCARVER. THE FOUNDER OF BURLINGTON, IOWA, SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA AND TACOMA, WASHINGTON,- General McCarver was born near Lexington Kentucky, January 14, 1807. Of an independent, roving spirit, determination, courage and enterprise that knew no bounds, he quit his home at the age of eighteen years and went to Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, and not finding anything congenial to his tastes returned and settled in 1830 at Galena, Illinois, where he was married to a Miss Mary Ann Jennings. He served in the Black Hawk war, and after the surrender of the great chief of the Sacs and Foxes, and as soon as the treaty between Black Hawk and the United Sates had been drafted in 1833 (by the terms of which the valuable territory now the State of Iowa was to be ceded to the United States), and before the treaty was signed, he left his home in Illinois in view of locating a city which would one day become one of the great commercial centers of the West, towards which the tide of emigration was rapidly setting. McCarver, then twenty-six years of age, journeyed down the Mississippi to a point then known as the Flint Hills; and in the evening, before crossing from the Illinois shore, he found shelter beneath the hospitable roof...

Read More

Biography of Dr. W. C. McKay

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now DR. W.C. McKAY. – One by one the pioneers who braved the wilderness and its dangers, in order that their posterity might enjoy the fruits of their hazardous conquests of the domain of the savage are passing away. As the poet sang of the valorous knights of the days of chivalry, “Their souls are with the saints, we trust,” so, at no distant day, will the same be sung o’er the graves of the last of the pioneers. So, while yet alive, let us honor them as they deserve to be honored; and when dead let their deeds be recorded with loving remembrance on the pages of history. Of the old pioneers who still exist, Umatilla county can claim but a few. Prominent among them is Doctor William C. McKay, who, together with his father and his grandfather, figured conspicuously in the eventful early history of the State of Oregon. His father, Thomas McKay, was born in Canada. When he had grown into a lusty lad of some fourteen summers, he, together with his father, Alexander McKay, then a partner of the millionaire, John Jacob Astor, left for Oregon to establish a trading-post. The expedition sailed in the ill-fated ship Tonquin, and arrived at the mouth of the Columbia, the beauty of whose rolling waters and...

Read More

Biography of Flemming R. Hill

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now FLEMMING R. HILL. – Mr. Hill’s experiences have been so varied and extensive, and his services on this coast so valuable, that we can here give but enough to serve as specimens. He was born in Overton county, Tennessee, in 1824. In 1829 he accompanied his parents west to a new home in Missouri, and in 1844, was ready for adventures of his own account. With three companions he set forth to the Rocky Mountains, but at the rendezvous left their enterprise, and joined himself as teamster to a train of emigrants bound for Oregon. The trip across the plains was varied with many exciting and amusing incidents. Being weather-bound a day at Ash Hollow, a few hours were spent in exploring a cave filled with bones, said to be those of a party of trappers killed by the Indians. At the north fork of the Platte, Mr. Hill had a very narrow escape. After the train had crossed the ford, it only remained to cross the cattle. When this was commenced, it was found that one of the company was on foot and unable to get over. Hill offered to lend him his horse, and to take the chances of crossing upon one of the cattle. The cattle entered the river by a buffalo trail,...

Read More

Biography of Rev. Gustavus Hines

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now REV. GUSTAVUS HINES. – Gustavus Hines was born in Herkimer county, New York, in 1809. On his mother’s side he was descended from the Carvets and Wilkensons of the old Massachusetts colony, and on his father’s from the Hopkinns of Rhode Island, all names of the highest respectability and even celebrity in the early history of New England. Governor Carvet of Massachusetts colony, and Stephen Hopkinns, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, were of the same families. he grew to his majority in the county of his birth, and in 1832 removed to Cattaraugus county, in the western part of the same state, and soon after entered the itinerant ministry of the Methodist-Episcopal church in the Genesee conference. He filled important appointments in that conference until 1839, when he was appointed by Bishop Hidding and the missionary board of said church as “Missionary to Oregon,” and sailed from New York on the 9th of October of that year in the ship Lausanne, Spaulding master, which had been chartered by the missionary board to convey Reverend Jason Lee and his missionary company of thirty-six souls to the Columbia river. Passing around Cape Horn, calling at Rio Janeiro, Valparaiso and Honolulu, the company landed in Oregon at Vancouver on the 1st day of June, 1840....

Read More

Adcock, Don Joseph – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Sumpter, Oregon Don Joseph Adcock, Sr., 68, of Sumpter, died Dec. 21, 2001, at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Boise. His memorial service was Wednesday at Coles Funeral Home. Dr. Clifford Billings of Baker City Community Church officiated. Don was born Aug. 16, 1933, at Oregon City to Joseph Granville Adcock and Theresa Marie Adcock. Don graduated from Oregon City High School. He then joined the National Guard, Coast Guard and then the Air Force, where he was in the 22nd Air Refueling Squad and earned a college degree in hydraulic engineering. He had a total of 20 years of military service in all. Don married Patricia Irene Hainline on March 21, 1959, in Bliss, Idaho. They raised five children. They lived in Oregon City until 1975, when they moved to Sumpter. He enjoyed hunting and fishing, and was a real history buff. He also enjoyed being with his family and friends. He always had a story to tell. He belonged to the Masons, Scottish Rite and Shriners. He also belonged to the Sumpter Valley Association. Don is survived by his wife, Patricia Irene Adcock of Sumpter; two sons, Don J. Adcock Jr. of Baker City and Dean Adcock and his wife, Linda, of Eagle Creek; three daughters, Charlene Whiteside of Newport, Terri Adcock of Eugene...

Read More

Roy, Doris Mary Scott Mrs. – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Dorris Mary Scott Roy, 88, a former Baker City resident, died Aug. 10, 2001, in Oregon City. Mrs. Roy was born on Sept. 30, 1912, at Corvallis to Frank and Malinda Scott. She was proud of her roots and the fact that she was a native Oregonian. Her paternal grandfather came West in a wagon train from Dubuque County, Iowa, and settled at Tangent in 1853. After graduating from Corvallis High School, she completed a degree in home economics from Oregon State University and earned a master’s degree in Extension Education from the University of Wisconsin. She lived in Baker City from 1952 to 1959, where she started her 22-year career in the Extension Service. She also served in Yamhill, Jefferson and Clatsop counties. As an Extension agent, she received a Distinguished Service Award for her outstanding program development from the National Association of Extension Home Economics. After retirement, she moved to the Portland area. Survivors include her son, Richard Roy of Portland; her daughter, Marilyn Torsen of West Linn; six grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Oregon 4-H Foundation, Ballard Hall, OSU, Corvallis, OR 97331. Used with permission from: The Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, August 22, 2001 Transcribed by: Belva...

Read More

Biography of Haman C. Lewis

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now HAMAN C. LEWIS. – This dauntless pioneer of the earliest times in our state was born in New York City January 31, 1803, and was the son of a ship carpenter. He early was apprenticed to learn the trade of a cooper, but while only a boy of fourteen went to sea, serving six months as cabin boy, and later was apprenticed to the ship carpenter. At eighteen he went as sailor – or perhaps more strictly speaking as “fillibusterer” – to the Gulf coast, taking service on a Mexican privateer. For a number of years he followed a most adventurous life, engaged in many rencontres with the Spaniards, and at the ports of Mexico, the West Indies and Yucatan saw all of life in the hot and riotous portions of North American. He took an excursion into Alabama, and in that state enjoyed six months schooling, – all that he received, – and became there very deeply imbued with Southern views and principles. At Mobile, in Texas, and in New Orleans, and again on the Spanish main, he undertook and carried on many doubtful adventures, which required resource, address and courage, – all bravely concluded, but without the monetary results that he hoped for; for, in all these chances and hazards, he was seeking for...

Read More

Biography of A. Lawrence Lovejoy

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A. LAWRENCE LOVEJOY. – The subject of this memoir was born in Groton, Massachusetts, March 14, 1808, and was the third son of Doctor Samuel and Betsey Lawrence Lovejoy, descendants of good English families. His mother, Betsey Lawrence Lovejoy, was a cousin and adopted sister of Amos and Abbot Lawrence of Boston. When quite young he moved with his parents to Townson, Massachusetts, where he was a pupil of the Reverend David Palmer until the age of sixteen, when the death of his mother made it necessary for him to reside with an elder brother in Boston, where he engaged in the mercantile business for a short time. Subsequently he gave up the business and entered as a student at Cambridge College; but, finishing his course at Amherst, he read law with Judge Seth May, of Maine, and was admitted to the bar in that state. Being imbued with the spirit of migration he started west, came to Missouri and opened a law office in the town of Sparta. In the spring of 1842 he joined Doctor Elijah White and a party of one hundred and twenty-five emigrants to cross the then unexplored region of the vast plains and Rocky Mountains to Oregon. This journey was attended with much hardship and danger. While engaged in carving...

Read More

Biography of Daniel H. Lownsdale

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now DANIEL H. LOWNSDALE. – Mr. Lownsdale, the son of one of the earliest settlers of Kentucky, was born in Mason county, of that state, April 8, 1803. As was the custom in those days, he was married quite young – at the age of twenty-three – to Miss Ruth, the youngest daughter of Paul Overfield, the head of one of the most prominent families of Northeastern Kentucky. In obedience to the venturesome spirit inherited form his father, who had abandoned the comforts of civilization in his youth to become one of the conquerors of Kentucky, young Lownsdale, with his young wife, immediately removed to Gibson county, Indiana, which was then almost on the frontier. There he had the misfortune to lose his wife, who died in 1830, leaving him three children, one boy and two girls. Soon after this, making suitable provision for his children, he went south, remaining for a time in Georgia, engaged in mercantile pursuits. His health failing, he accepted the advice of physicians, and embarked in 1842 on a voyage to Europe, remaining abroad, visiting various countries, until 1844. Returning to the United States in that year, he found the country excited over the Oregon question; and, without parleying, he joined one of those devoted bands that crossed three thousand miles of...

Read More

Biography of George Benson Kuykendall, M.D.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now GEORGE BENSON KUYKENDALL, M.D. – This gentleman, one of the foremost physicians of Eastern Washington, was born near Terre Haute, Indiana, in the year 1843. When three years old he was taken by his father’s family to Wisconsin. In 1852 the family set out on the long, hard journey to the Pacific slope. That was the sad year of cholera and pestilence. Being somewhat late in starting, the Kuykendall family followed in the wake of sickness and death, the mournful evidences of which were most vividly impressed on the mind of the boy who afterwards became the man here described. many an abandoned wagon, many a dying animal, and many a hastily hollowed grave, did they pass. They themselves plodded wearily on, keeping double vigil, – on the sick and dying within, and the prowling savages without. When the train reached Snake river, they crossed in the hope of finding better grass. Here the father was taken sick with typhoid fever; and for many weeks he was dragged helpless and seemingly at the point of death, over the dusty and dismal wastes of Southern, Idaho. Finally, nearly all the family stock having died, the wagon was abandoned; and the family was put into the wagon belonging to a brother, who was sharing with them the difficult...

Read More

Biography of General Joseph Lane

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now GENERAL JOSEPH LANE. – Joseph Lane first saw the light of day in North Carolina, December 14, 1801. He was reared in Henderson county, Kentucky. At the early age of twenty he was married to Miss Polly Hart, soon afterwards settling in Vanderburg county, Indiana, where he followed the humble life of a farmer for twenty-five years. While in the pursuit of this occupation, he was prominent as a leader in all matter of enterprise in the county. He soon drifted into politics, and was chosen to represent the county in the state legislature. He was continued in the same trust as long as he resided in the county. When the Mexican war began, the state senator resigned his seat, and prepared to enter the hostilities, when he was elected colonel of the Second Regiment of Indian Volunteers, and was ordered to report for duty at General Taylor’s headquarters at Brazos, Texas, which was then the seat of war. It was just prior to the battle of Buena Vista that General Lane was actively employed; and he took an active part in the glorious victory achieved by the American troops, commanding the left wing of Taylor’s army. During this engagement he was severely wounded by a bullet in the left shoulder; but, nothing daunted, he remained...

Read More

Search


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest