Location: Onondaga County NY

Dwelly Family of Fall River, MA

DWELLY (Fall River family). The name Dwelly is an uncommon one and the family not numerous in New England annals. The Fall River Dwelly family is a branch of the Rhode Island family and it of the Scituate (Mass.) family, the immediate Fall River family here considered being that of Dr. Jerome Dwelly, who for some threescore or more years has administered to the ailments of humanity in and about Fall River, where he has most surely been to this people the “beloved physician” and one of the city’s substantial men. In the succeeding generation, one of his sons – the late Frank H. Dwelly – was the treasurer of both the Tecumseh Mills and the Ancona Company, extensive manufacturing concerns of Fall River. Here follows in detail and chronologically arranged from the first known American ancestor of the family the history of this Fall River branch of the Dwelly family. Richard Dwelly, of Scituate in 1665, or earlier, probably the same who was in Lancaster in 1654, and in Hingham in 1663, sold his estate in Hingham and removed to Scituate. His farm in the latter place was on the road leading from the third Herring brook to the harbor. For service in King Philip’s war he received a grant of land between Cornet’s mill and the Plymouth road. He had meadow land at Till’s creek, which stream...

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Seneca County New York Genealogy

A guide and directory to Seneca County New York genealogy, containing both online and offline resources for genealogy and historical research. This article contains sources of genealogical data about Seneca County such as biographies, cemetery records, census records, church records, court records, family records, land records, military records, naturalization records, and vital records.

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Antiquities of Pompey and Adjacent Parts of Onondaga County

No part of western New York has furnished a larger number of antiquarian remains, or been more often referred to, than the geo-graphical area which constituted the original town of Pompey. There is, consequently, the less need of devoting elaborate attention to the details of this particular locality. It was first visited and described by De Witt Clinton, in 1810-11, 1Trans, of Philo. and Lit. Society of New York. and the plough has since rendered it a task less easy than it then was, to examine the lines of its ancient works and its archaeological remains. It is quite evident, from the objects of art disclosed at and about these antique sites of security and defense, that civilized man dwelt here in remote times, and there must be assigned to this part of the State a period of European occupancy prior to the commonly received historical era of discovery and settlement, or, at least, if falling within it, as there is now reason to believe, yet almost wholly unknown, or for gotten in its annals. Sismondi has well remarked, that only the most important events come down to posterity, and that fame, for a long flight, prepares to forget every thing which she possibly can. That no accounts should remain of obscure events, in a remote part of the country, at an early date, is not surprising. As it...

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List of Occupants of the Onondaga Reservation, Onondaga County, New York

The Onondaga reservation, lying in Onondaga County, forms a rectangle of a little more than 2.3 miles by 4 miles, commencing about 5 miles southward from the city of Syracuse, and contains about 6,100 acres: Onondaga castle, with hotel, store, post office, and a few houses, is at the “entrance gate “. The blue limestone quarries belonging to the Onondaga Nation furnish excellent building material, but the deep strata, which will measure from 18 to 20 inches in thickness, are 20 feet below the ground surface, requiting laborious and expensive stripping. Only 3 derricks are now worked, each paying...

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Reservations of the Six Nations in New York and Pennsylvania, 1723-1890

The accompanying map was prepared in 1771 under the direction of William Tryon, captain general and governor in chief of the province of New York, and is as nearly suggestive of the then recognized boundary of the Six Nations as any that has had official sanction. In 1851 Lewis H. Morgan, assisted by Ely S. Parker, a Seneca chief; and afterward an efficient staff Officer of General Grant, and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, prepared a map for a volume entitled League of the Iroquois, which aimed to define the villages, trails, and boundaries of the Five Nations as...

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Biography of Elder John G. Hook

Elder John G. Hook, of Concord, N.H., was born in Chichester, this State, February 13, 1820, the son of Jacob Hook. Elder Hook’s grandfather, Francis Hook, was born in Salisbury, Mass. He was a fisherman by occupation, and he also ran a horseback express from his native town to Newburyport. He finally bought a large tract of land in Chichester, and started all his five sons in life with a comfortable farm. Jacob Hook, father of Elder Hook, was the eldest of the family. He was educated in the Salisbury public schools, and was engaged in farming all his life. At the time of his death he was exactly ninety-two years and six months old. He married Hannah Griffin, of Northwood, N.H. Six children were born to him: Esther B.; Asa J.; Mary A.; Elvira, who died at the age of five; John G., the subject of this sketch; and William P. Elder Hook is the only survivor of this 1839 he started for the Far West. On the way he met some kinsfolk, among them an aunt and several cousins, and stayed with them in the town of Marcellus, N.Y., where he was providentially converted to the Christian religion, largely through the influence of his devoted aunt. Word reached his parents in the East that he had been murdered, and his mother was saved from dying of grief...

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Biography of George S. Bond

George S. Bond, a manufacturer of Charlestown, was born in that town, March 2, 1837, son of Silas and Alice (Abbot) Bond. His grandfather, William Bond, who was born in Watertown, Mass., at the age of twenty years came to Charlestown, and thereafter carried on general farming during the remainder of his active life. One of his six children was Silas Bond, who married Alice Abbot, and also was the father of six children, including the subject of this sketch. George S. Bond was educated in the district schools of the town. At the age of seven years his father died. When about nine years old he went to Fall River, where he worked for two years. After his return to Charlestown he worked on various farms in Charlestown and Acworth for about five years. He subsequently went to Brockton, Mass., learned the shoe finishing business, and remained there until he was eighteen years of age. He then went to Syracuse, N.Y., where he worked at bis trade for two years. In 1856 he returned to Charlestown and took up the tinsmith trade. He then went to Putney, Vt., where he worked for four years. In 1865 he bought out the tin store of W. B. Downer, and afterward carried it on for fifteen years. On retiring from that business, he bought out the violin case manufactory that had...

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Biography of Rev. Josiah Lamberson Parrish

REV. JOSIAH LAMBERSON PARRISH. – This well-known pioneer, one of the few survivors of the early missionary force of Oregon, was born in Onondaga county, New York, on the 14th of October, 1806. From his father he learned the trades of blacksmithing and farming; and to them he devoted most of his time till he reached the age of twenty-four. At that time failure of his health from overwork caused him to turn his attention to the harness and saddlery trade. At about the same time he began preaching as a local preacher in the Methodist church. His field of labor was at Pike, Alleghany county, New York. In 1833 he was married to Elizabeth Winn. Two years later he closed out his business as a saddle and harness dealer, and devoted his time mainly to preaching until 1839. He was then appointed blacksmith to the Methodist Mission of Oregon by the New York board. In company with Jason Lee he came to Oregon in the ship Lausanne. The course was via Cape Horn. After reaching Oregon, MR. Parrish spent two years in blacksmithing for various missionary stations and settlers in the Willamette valley. In 1843 he was appointed missionary to the Indians at the mouth of the Columbia river. He remained there until the Mission was closed in 1846. After a short stay at Oregon City, he was...

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Biographical Sketch of Simon Ralph Walkingstick Jr.

Simon Ralph, son of Simon Ridge and Viola (Osborne) Walkingstick was born at Tahlequah Aug. 17, 1896. Educated at Bacone and Dartmouth Colleges, graduating from the latter with B. S. degree. Married at Syracuse, N. Y. December 15, 1917, Margaret E., daughter of C. H. McKaig. They are the parents of Syvertsen Ralph Walkingstick, born. July 3, 1920. Simon Ralph Walkingstick is a Presyterian. In Dartmouth, he was one of the eleven members of the students governing body, President of the College Y. M. C. A., President of the Collegiate Cosmopolitan Club. originator of one of the two principal College yells, Secretary of the New England College Prohibition Association, Secretary of the Army Y. M. C. A. work on the Mexican border in 1916 transferred to Egypt and then to India and later became Senior Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. activities with the British Army of Base Area in Mesopotamia rank of Captain and on returning to the United States he was assigned to the Oklahoma Y. M. C. A. work as Secretary of the State Indian...

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Biography of James F. Mahon

It is especially gratifying to be enabled to chronicle in this volume of the history of Harney county the salient points in the career of the estimable gentleman whose name appears at the head of this sketch, since he has done so much for the development and advancement of this county, has demonstrated his ability as a financier and to handle successfully large interests, of which he is happily possessed at the present time, being doubtless the largest grain farmer in the county and also a leader in raising fine horses and mules; while individually, Mr. Mahon is a man of marked ability and integrity, always dominated by sound principles and possessed of an executive force and practical judgment that array him on the side of success, and his moral virtues and untarnished reputation for honor and uprightness are commensurate with his other qualifications of high order. The account, therefore, of Mr. Mahon’s operations in the county would form an important parts of its history, and it is but right that such giants of achievement, whose labors have wrought such advantage to all, should be granted a position which their sagacious conduct rightly marks as their own. Reverting more particularly to the personal history of our subject, we note, which accounts for his indefatigable energy and the boundless resources of his personality, which demonstrate him equal to any emergency, that he comes from stanch...

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Biographical Sketch of Matthew Neeves

MATTHEW NEEVES. – Mr. Neeves, a prominent citizen of Pendleton, Oregon, was born near Syracuse, New York, in 1830. He there received a common-school education and remained until he was twenty years old. Going west to Galesburg, Illinois, he made his way in that new section in the capacity of a Yankee school-master. After one year in that place he went to Platt county, and remained another year as teacher. In 1852 he was induced to join the company of the veteran pioneer Joab Powell, and arrived at Portland in October of the same year. He first turned his attention to mining on Rogue River, and remained one year. After this he made his home in Douglas county until 1862, and went thence to the Florence mines, and was engaged in mining and freighting until 1867. At that date he returned to Douglas county, and remained in that delightful region more than ten years. After this long rest he was ready again for a new settlement, and, coming to Umatilla county, located a claim on Butter creek, and remained engaged in stock-raising and farming until 1880. The attractions of Pendleton, however, which was now becoming a point of interest and importance, led him to make his home within her borders and enjoy the remaining years of his life. He has one daughter and a stepson. After many reverses he...

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Biography of General Edward McConville

In the recent trial of arms in which America won recognition and admiration never before accorded her by the older “powers” of Europe, there was no more distinguished or valiant soldier than General McConville, of Idaho, who went forth as one of the commanders of the Idaho troops and laid down his life on the altar of his country. His was a noble life and a glorious death, and his name is enduringly inscribed on the roll of America’s heroes. Though his loss is deeply mourned by his many friends, his memory will ever be cherished by all who knew him, and the cause of liberty will acknowledge its advancement to him and his compatriots who have fallen in defense of the honor of the flag and the noble principles of republicanism and justice which it represents. General McConville was a native of New York, his birth having occurred at Cape Vincent, Jefferson County, June 25, 1846. The history of the family furnishes many examples of valor, for since the days when William the Conqueror fought the battle of Hastings its representatives have won honor and fame in the military and naval service of France, England, Ireland and America. The family had its origin in France, it’s branches being found in Brittany, Gascony and Normandy. Two representatives of the name fought with William, the Norman prince, at the battle...

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Biography of Milton Kelly

Judge Milton Kelly, now deceased, who attained considerable prominence as one of Idaho’s most loyal citizens and public-spirited men, was born in Onondaga County, New York, September 9, 1818, and descended from Irish ancestors who were early settlers in New England. He was reared on his father’s farm, obtaining his early education in Bloomfield, New York, and when still young taught school. He went to Ohio, subsequently removing to Wisconsin, where for some time he was engaged in the mercantile business, and then studied law and was admitted to the bar about 1845. He then took up the practice of his profession, for which he was peculiarly fitted by his natural abilities, and during his thirteen years of active professional life in Wisconsin he became intimately acquainted with the leading men and was prominently identified with shaping the destiny of the then new state. In 1861 Judge Kelly went to California and the following year removed to the new mining town of Auburn, Oregon, where he engaged in the express and transportation business, between that town and Placerville, Boise County, Idaho, later making his home in Placerville. In the autumn of 1863, following the act of organization of the territory of Idaho, he was, at an election held in Boise County, elected a member of the first session of the Idaho territorial legislature, which was held in Lewiston, Nez...

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Biography of Edwin R. Sherwin

This well and favorably known resident of Grangeville came to the territory of Idaho when the, flourishing city of Lewiston was but a collection of tents, and through the thirty-seven, years that have since come and gone he has been an important element in the business life of this section of the commonwealth. He was born in Onondaga County, New York, January 26, 1821, and is of English and German descent. His ancestors were early settlers of New England, and the grandfather. Captain Joshua Sherwin, was a resident of Hartford, Connecticut. He was one of a family of seven sons, whose parents were old-school Presbyterians and gave to all of their children scriptural names. Joshua Sherwin, Jr., the father of our subject, was born in the Nutmeg state, and in New York wedded Miss Mary Perry. He was an industrious and respected farmer, whose life was well spent. Both he and his wife were consistent members of the Presbyterian Church, and while attending a convention of the church in Buffalo, New York, he was taken ill with cholera. For a time he appeared to improve, and made his way to his home, but soon after had a relapse and died of the disease. In the family were four children, but a daughter and our subject are the only ones now living. The mother died when Edwin R. Sherwin was...

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Biography of George H. North

Among the worthy citizens that New York has furnished to the state of Idaho is George H. North, the well known clothing merchant of Pocatello, whose enterprising, progressive methods give character to the business life of the city, and whose reputation in commercial circles is unassailable. He was born in Springwater, Livingston County, of the Empire state, July 14, 1858, a son of C. S. and Elvira Thankful (Wetmore) North, who likewise were natives of the same county. The father successfully carried on farming there until his death, which occurred in the fifty-eighth year of his age, while his wife, who still survives, is now sixty-five years of age. They were the parents of five children, but only two are living at this writing, in the summer of 1899. George H. North, having obtained his preliminary education in the common school, supplemented it by a course in the Geneseo Western Seminary, in Syracuse, New York, where he was graduated with the class of 1876. He then worked on his father’s farm for a time, after which he started westward and accepted a clerkship with his uncle, Orland North, in Evanston Spring, Wyoming. He spent two years in that place and then began business on his own account in Shoshone, Idaho. Subsequently he came to Pocatello and, as a member of the firm of North & Church, established his present...

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