Location: Oklahoma City Oklahoma

Fort Gibson Conference with the Indians, 1834

One of the most important Indian conferences ever held in the Southwest, occurred at Fort Gibson in 1834 for it paved the way for agreements and treaties essential to the occupation of a vast country by one hundred thousand members of the Five Civilized Tribes emigrating from east of the Mississippi; to the security of settlers and travelers in a new country; to development of our Southwest to the limits of the United States and beyond and contributed to the subsequent acquisition of the country to the coast, made known to us by the pioneers to Santa Fe and California traveling through the region occupied by the “wild” Indians who, at Fort Gibson, gave assurances of their friendship. It is true, these assurances were not always regarded, and many outrages were afterwards committed on the whites and by the whites, but the Fort Gibson conference was the beginning and basis upon which ultimately these things were accomplished.

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Washington Irving at Fort Gibson, 1832

The McIntosh Creeks had been located along Arkansas River near the Verdigris on fertile timbered land which they began at once to clear, cultivate, and transform into productive farms. The treaty of 1828 with the Cherokee gave the latter a great tract of land on both sides of Arkansas River embracing that on which the Creeks were located. This was accomplished by a blunder of the Government officials, in the language of the Secretary of War, 1U.S. House, Executive Documents, 22d congress, first session, no. 116, President’s Message submitting the memorial of the Creek Indians. “when we had not...

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Lee, Harley Essex – Obituary

Kansas City–Harley E. Lee, one of the five Lee brothers who founded the old Lee Hotel, now the Huckins, Oklahoma City, died Monday [June 13, 1960]. He was 75. Lee was prominent in real estate and investment and moved here from Oklahoma City in 1922. He developed one of the leading housing developments in Leewood, a suburb of Kansas City. He and his four brothers became partners in Oklahoma real estate in the early 1900s. Lee was a native of Ottumwa, Iowa. Services will be at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday in Stiner and McClure Funeral Home. Burial will be at 1 p.m. Thursday at Fairlawn Cemetery, Oklahoma City. Surviving are his wife, Ruth; his daughter, Mrs. Jack C. Mankin, Kansas City, and four grandchildren. The Oklahoman, June 15, 1960 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Biographical Sketch of B. H. Markham

(See Ghigau)-Bettie Ann, daughter of James Walker and Lucy Cordelia Skinner, was born April 12, 1888. Married at Clarksville, Arkansas, December 23, 1909 Baird Hackett Markham, born March 28, 1887, in Decatur, Texas. They are the parents of Jewell Marie, born August 17, 1911 and Baird Hackett, son of Winston Baird and Ada Hackett Markham, born April 12, 1916. Mr. Markham was educated in the Denison High School an the Texas Christian University of Waco, graduating from both. He is the owner of the Markham Motor Company of Oklahoma City. Mr. and Mrs. Markham are members of the Presbyterian church. He is affiliated with the Elks, Odd Fellows, Woodmen and Knights of Pythias. Is a member of the Kiwanee, Golf, Automobile, Lakeside Country, Add Centarian, National Guard, National Highway, Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce, Clubs. He has been President of the Oklahoma Automobile Dealers Association, president of the National Guard Club and Colonel of the Oklahoma National Guards by virtue of which he was acting Adjutant General of Oklahoma. Lucy Cordelia, daughter of Judge George Washington and Louisa (Spriggs) Parks, was born June 12, 1852. Married September 26, 1876 James Walker Skinner, born June 15, 1844 in Kentucky. He was captain of Company A, 2nd Kentucky Cavalry under Colonel Basil Duke. Mrs. Skinner died July 29, 1896 and he died July 11, 1921. They were the parents of: Rosa...

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Biographical Sketch of Maude Ella Webb

(See Cordery)-James Forrest Webb, born August 24, 1862, in Gwinnett County, Georgia. Married January 21, 1882 Elizabeth Parker, daughter of Parker Collies and Elizabeth (Little) Harris, and they were the parents of Maude Ella Webb, born May 25, 1890. Miss Webb was educated at the Female Seminary; and is at present cashier in a drug store in Oklahoma...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs.Thomas H. Owen

(See Grant) Louise Scott, daughter of James Orval and Mary E. (Davis) Hall, was born near Vinita, August 23, 1877. She was educated at Vinita and Harrell Institute, and is a graduate from the latter institution. She married November 2, 1898, Luman Franklin Parker, born August 23, 1872, in Phelps County, Missouri. He died Aug. 14, 1912. Mrs. Parker married Thos. H. Owen March 12 1916. They are residents of Oklahoma...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. John R. Alley

(See Grant, Downing, Ghigau and Ross) Clara Eva, daughter of Edward Daniel and Elizabeth Henryetta (Musgrove) Hicks, was born in Tahlequah on February 10, 1890. She was educated in the Female Seminary, from which she graduated. She married at Claremore Aug. 15, 1908, John Reed, son of Frederick and Sarah Dameron Alley, born Sept. 26, 1873, Yell County, Ark. They are the parents of Lawrence Alley, born May 21, 1910. Mr. Alley is a contractor in Oklahoma City, and a member of the Masonic fraernity. They are members of the Presbyterian Church. Francis Marion Mushgrove married Clara Eva Alberty, and they were the parents Mrs. Edward Daniel Hicks. Daniel Ross Hicks married Nancy Jane Rider, and they were the parents of Edward Daniel Hicks. Mrs. James K. Blake graduated from the female Seminary May 31, 1906. Henry Clay Meigs, father of Mrs. Blake, was elected clerk of Illinois District in 1893, and Judge he same District in...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Hubert Ambrister

(See Grant)-Julia Theresa daughter of William Columbus and Jane (Davis) Patton, married Dr. Francis Bartow Fite; and they were the parents Frances Fite, born Sept. 24, 1893, in Muskogee. She was educated in National Cathedral School, Washington, D. C., and graduated from Vassar College. She married at Muskogee July 7, 1920, Hubert, son Samuel A. Ambrister, born Feb. 1891, in Norman County, Oklahoma. Mr. Ambrister was educated in Norman High School and is graduate of University of Okla. He is practicing law in Oklahoma City. He served two years in the Aviation Corps during the World War. Thomas James Adair is the grand son of Thomas Benjamin Adair was a native of Georgia and the son of John and Jennie (Kilgore) Adair. Jennie Kilgore was said have been a paternal aunt of Congressan “Buck” Kilgore of Texas. Thomas James Adair was elected a member of the Board of Education in 1883 and chosen as Secretary of that body. He has for many years been one of the leading merchants of Tahlequah. Mr. and Mrs. Adair have only one daughter; Miss Emily, a talented and accomplished young lady who is a graduate from the Northeastern Oklahoma State Normal. She was born December 9,...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. William R. Samuel

(See Downing) Minnie L., daughter of Clement and Rebecca Caroline (Bryan) Hayden, was born at Chouteau April 5, 1879. She was educated in Liberty, Mo. Married on April 21, 1901, William Ruben Samuel, born February 2, 1869 in Calloway County, Missouri. He graduated May 28, 1902, from Stephens College, Columbia, Missouri. They are the parents of Rebecca Ann Samuel, born Oct. 3, 1917. Mr. Samuel is Secretary of the State Bankers Association, and is a Mason and Odd Fellow. He was for four years State Insurance Commissioner. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel are members of the Methodist church, and residents of Oklahoma City. Rebecca Wright, born January 1, 1814, married Joel Mayes Bryan, born October 22, 1809. She died April 5, 1882, and he died August 7, 1899. They were the parents of Rebecca Caroline Bryan, born January 30, 1850, who married March 7, 1869, Clement Hayden, born March 20, 1846 in Renfon County, Arkansas. Mrs. Hayden died July 11, 1916 and Mr. Hayden died May 2,...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Roy Letteer

(See Grant)—Lahoma Lucile, daughter of Chief William Charles and Nannie (Haynie) Rogers, was born at Skiatook, May 4, 1900. Educated at Skiatook and married in Oklahoma City, Oct. 19, 1920, Roy, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Letteer. They are the parents of Jane E. Letteer, born September 11, 1921. Mrs. Letteer is the daughter of William Charles Rogers the last chief of the Cherokees amid the great grand-daughter of Captain John Rogers, the last chief of the Old Settler...

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63rr and Penn Avenue Cemetery Records, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma

CARLSON (Infant), b. 21 Jan. 1918, d. 22 Jan. 1918. COLE Margaret H., b. 19 June 1878, d. 16 Sept. 1898. CONKEY Amanda M., b. 6 Feb. 19__, d. 21 Jan. 1925. L. B., b. 18 Dec. 1846, d. 18 July 1921. COOK F. W., b. 24 Sept. 1876, d. 4 Aug. 1938. DOUGLASS Linina C., b. 28 Oct. 1907, ae. 57 yrs. Wife to W. L. Douglass. DUNN Frances Ann, b. 27 Feb. 1834, d. 18 Sept. 1922. FARRINGTON Elizabeth C., b. 22 Feb. 1844, d. 27 Sept. 1901. Wife to E. D. Farrington. FLETCHER Flora, d. 18 July 1890. Wife to James Fletcher. GANN Claude, Jr., b. 6 Jan. 1932, d. 14 Jan. 1932. Frank W., b. 1891, d. 1928. JENKS Herold A., b. 21 Mar. 1910, d. 25 Oct. 1925. KERBY Jay H., b. 26 Oct. 1899, son of D. C. Kerby and Eva, d. 8 Oct. 1917. KUNZ Emma, b. 21 Mar. 1872, d. 11 May 1917. LAND Mae Rag, b. 1875, d. 1902. LECKY Emley, b. 28 Jan. 1823, d. 1 Aug. 1895. MATTHEW Claudie, dau. of J. A. Matthew and M. M., d. 17 Apr. 1898, ae. 11 mos., 10 days. MILLER (Infant), b. 1943, d. 10 Apr. 1943, ae. 5 days. Charles, b. 1869, d. 1895. Harry, b. 1893, d. 1895. John, b. 1844, d. 1915. Nellie M., b. 1883, d. 1927....

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Slave Narrative of Alice Alexander

Person Interviewed: Alice Alexander Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Jackson Parish, Louisiana Date of Birth: 1849 Age: 88 I was 88 years old the 15th of March. I was born in 1849, at Jackson Parish, Louisiana. My mother’s name was Mary Marlow , and father’s Henry Marlow. I can’t remember very much ’bout slavery ’cause I was awful small, but I am remember that my mother’s master, Colonel Threff died, and my mother, her husband, and as three chillun was handed down to Colonel Threff’s ‘poor en folks. Colonel Threff owned about two or three hundred head of niggers. and all or ’em was tributed to his poor kin. Ooh wee! he sho’ had fact a lot of them too! Master Joe Threff, one of his poor kin, took my nether, her husband, and three of us chillun from Louisiana to the Mississippi Line. Down there we lived in a one room log hut, and slept on homemade rail bad steads with cotton, and sometimes straw, mostly straw summers and cotton winners. I worked round the house and locked after de smaller chillun, I mean my mother’s chillun. Mostly we ate yeller meal corn bread and sorghum molasses. I ate possums when we could get ’em, but jest couldn’t stand rabbit meat. Didn’t know there was any Christmas or holidays in dem days. I can’t ‘membuh nothing...

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Slave Narrative of Jane Montgomery

Person Interviewed: Jane Montgomery Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Homer, Louisiana Date of Birth: March 15, 1857 Age: 80 I was born March 15, 1857, in Homer, Louisiana. I claim to be 75 years old, but that’s jest my way of counting. My mother was Sarah Strong and my father was Edmond Beavers. We lived in a log cabin that had jest one door. I had two sisters named Peggy and Katie. Mammy was bought from the Strong family and my pappy was bought from Beavers by Mister Eason. We slept on wooden slabs which was jest make-shift beds. I didn’t do no work in slave times ’cause I was too little. You jest had to be good and husky to work on that place. I listened and told mammy everything I heerd. I ate right side dat old white woman on the flo’. I was a little busy-body. I don’t recollect eating in our quarters on Sunday and no other time. I don’t remember no possums and rabbits being on our place, ’cause when white folks killed a chicken for their selves, dey killed one for the niggers. My pappy never ate no cornbread in all his put-together. Meat was my favorite food. I never ate no dry bread without no meat. We wore homespun clothes. My first pair of shoes was squirrel skin. Mammy had...

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Slave Narrative of Hal Hutson

Person Interviewed: Hal Hutson Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Galveston, Tennessee Date of Birth: October 12, 1847 Age: 90 I was born at Galveston, Tennessee, October 12, 1847. There were 11 children: 7 brothers; Andrew, George, Clent, Gilbert, Frank, Mack and Horace; and 3 girls Eosie, Marie and Eancy. We were all Hutsons. Together with my mother and father we worked for the same man whose name was Mr. Barton Brown, but who we all call Master Brown, and sometime. Master Brown had a good weather-board house, two story, with five or six rooms. They lived pretty well. He had eight children. We lived in one-room log huts. There were a long string of them huts. We slept on the floor like hogs. Girls and boys slept together, jest everybody slept every whar. We never knew what biscuits were! We ate “seconds and shorts” (wheat ground once) for bread. Ate rabbits, possums baked with taters, beans, and been soup. No chicken, fish and the like. My favorite dish now is beans. Master Brown owned about 36 or 40 slaves, I can’t recall jest now, and about 200 acres of ground. There was very little cotton raised in Galveston, I mean jest some corn. Sometimes we would shuck corn all night. He would not let us raise gardens of our own, but didn’t mind us raising corn and...

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Slave Narrative of Mattie Hariman

Person Interviewed: Mattie Hariman Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Gunalis, Texas Date of Birth: January 2, 1859 Age: 78 I was born January 2, 1859, at Gunalis, Texas. My father’s name was William Tensley and my mother’s name Mildred Howard. They was brought from Virginia. I did have 8 brothers and sisters but all of them are dead. My Master was name William Henry Edward. Since I was too young to work I nursed my sisters’ children while they worked. The cooking was done all up to the general kitchen at Masters house and when slaves come from work they would send their children up to the kitchen to bring their meals to their homes in the quarters. Our Mistress would have one of the cooks to dish up vegetables and she herself would slice or serve the meat to see that it wasn’t wasted, as seemingly it was thought so precious. As my mother worked ’round the Big House quite a deal I would go up to the Big House with her and play with the white children who seemed to like for me to come to play with them. One day in anger while playing I called one of the white girls. “old black dog” and they pretended they would tell their mother (my Mistress) about it. I was scared, as they saw, and they...

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