Location: Oconee County SC

Slave Narrative of Emoline Wilson

Interviewer: G. Leland Summer Person Interviewed: Emoline Wilson Date of Interview: May 21, 1937 Location: Newberry, South Carolina “I was a Garmany before I married Calvin Wilson. My father was Henry Garmany, and my mother Sidney Boozer. My husband was in the Confederate army with his master. Dey was near Charleston on de coast. I was slave of Lemuel Lane, of de Dutch Fork. He was killed after de war, some say by some of his young slaves, but we’uns did not know naything about who killed him. We had a good house to live in on Marse Lane’s plantation. I used to work around the house and in de fields. My mother was a good seamstress and helped de white folks sew, and she learn’t me to sew had help too. We didn’t get any money for our work. One time after de war, dey paid me only $5.00 and I quit ’em. My mother hired me out to work for her, and I didn’t have any money, still; so I said I better get me a man of my own. Marse Lane was mean to most of us, but good to me. He whipped me once and I deserved it because I wouldn’t answer him when he called me. He jes’ give me about two licks. He was mean to my mother, but he wouldn’t let his...

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Slave Narrative of Emoline Wilson

Interviewer: G. Leland Summer Person Interviewed: Emoline Wilson Date of Interview: August 10, 1937 Location: Newberry, South Carolina Place of Birth: Newberry County SC “I was born in Newberry County near Cannon’s Creek section in the Dutch Fork. I was a slave of Lemuel Lane. He was killed by some slaves just after freedom. They killed him for his money but didn’t find any, it was said. When freedom come, my mistress give me some things to eat when we left. “I can’t work much any more; I am old and I can’t get about. I live with my son who works when he can find work. We rent a two-room cottage in town. “I never heard anything about slaves getting 40 acres of land and a mule. None in that section got any. We had to go to work for other people. “The Ku Klux Klan never bothered us then, and we never had nothing to do with them, nor with politics. “There was no slaves living in our section who had come from...

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Slave Narrative of Susie Riser

Interviewer: G. Leland Summer Person Interviewed: Susie Riser Date of Interview: May 17, 1937 Location: Newberry, South Carolina Place of Birth: Dutch Fork, South Carolina “I was born near Broad River in de Dutch Fork of Newberry County. I was a slave of Cage Suber. He was a fair master, but nothing to brag about. I was small at slavery time and had to work in de white folks’ house or around the house until I was big enough to go to de field and work. “Old Marse Cage always made me fan flies off of him when he lay down to take a nap. The fan was made out of brushes. “De white folks had cotton-pickings, corn-shuckings and quiltings. Dey allus had something to eat at the frolics and I had to help wid ’em. “I married John Riser. I moved to town several years...

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Cheraw Indians

Cheraw Tribe: Significance unknown.¬† Also called: Ani’-Suwa’II, Cherokee name. Saraw, Suali, synonyms even more common than Cheraw. Xuala, Xualla, Spanish and Portuguese forms of the word, the x being intended for sh. Cheraw Connections. The Cheraw are classed on circumstantial grounds in the Siouan linguistic family though no words of their tongue have been preserved. Cheraw Location.-The earliest known location of the Cheraw appears to have been near the head of Saluda River in Pickens and Oconee Counties, S. C., whence they removed at an early date to the present Henderson, Polk, and Rutherford Counties. Cheraw Villages. The names given are always those of the tribe, though we have a “Lower Saura Town” and an “Upper Saura Town on a map dating from 1760. Cheraw History. Mooney (1928) has shown that the Cheraw are identical with the Xuala province which De Soto entered in 1540, remaining about 4 days. They were visited by Pardo at a later date, and almost a hundred years afterward Lederer (1912) heard of them in the same region. Before 1700 they left their old country and moved to the Dan River near the southern line of Virginia, where they seem to have had two distinct settlements about 30 miles apart. About the year 1710, on account of constant Iroquois attacks, they moved southeast and joined the Keyauwee. The colonists of North Carolina, being dissatisfied...

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Biography of Jefferson D. Cox

Jefferson D. Cox is actively connected with a profession that has important bearing upon the progress and stable prosperity of every community, and one in which advancement depends upon individual merit and ability. Ability becomes in a measure prominence, and that Mr. Cox occupies a leading position in the ranks of the legal profession is an indication of his learning and skill in his chosen field. He is also a successful stock man and he owns a large ranch where fancy Duroc hogs and Durham cattle are raised. Jefferson D. Cox was born in Walhalla, South Carolina, on the 1st of October, 1861, a son of Harmon and Adaline (Landreth)Cox, both natives of that state. For many years the father engaged in farming and the conduct of a cooperage business in his native state but in 1868 he removed with his family to Mountain Home, Arkansas. Here he resumed his trade and also farmed, achieving a substantial success and becoming one of the representative and progressive citizens of the community. He died in 1874. His widow survived him until 1909. In the acquirement of an education Jefferson D. Cox attended the public schools of Mountain Home, Arkansas, and was graduated from the high school at Valley Springs. Subsequently he took a business course in the Gaskill Business College at Jersey City, New Jersey, and upon the completion of his studies...

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Chiaha Tribe

The Chiaha were a more prominent tribe and evidently much larger than the Osochi. While the significance of their name is unknown it recalls the Choctaw chaha, “high,” “height,” and this would be in harmony with the situation in which part of the tribe was first encountered northward near the mountains of Tennessee. There is also a Cherokee place name which superficially resembles this, but should not be confounded with it. It is written by Mooney Tsiyahi and signifies “Otter place.” One settlement so named formerly existed on a branch of the Keowee River, near the present Cheohee, Oconee...

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Oconee County, South Carolina Census Records

  1790 Oconee County, South Carolina Census Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1790 Oconee County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1790 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Oconee County, South Carolina Census Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1800 Oconee County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Oconee County, South Carolina Census Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1810 Oconee County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Oconee County, South Carolina Census Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1820 Oconee County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Oconee County, South Carolina Census Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1830 Oconee County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Oconee County, South Carolina Census Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1840 Oconee County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $...

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