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Location: Niagara County NY

William Todd of Lockport NY

William Todd8, (Justus B.7, William6, Yale5, James4, James3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born June 30, 1845, married June 12, 1865, Delina Hollenbeck, of Lockport, N. Y., who was born Aug. 18, 1848. He was a miller and lived in Lockport, N. Y. Children: 2282. Charles A., b. June 30, 1866, d. Oct. 14, 1872. *2283. Frank C., b. Sept. 22, 1874. 2284. Frederick Bellamy, b. Dec. 23, 1879, d. Sept. 23,...

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Kelsey Todd of Royalton NY

Kelsey Todd8, (John7, David6, Abraham5, Abraham4, Jonah3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Feb. 11, 1835, in Royalton, Niagara County, N. Y., died July 20, 1897, married Mary Janette Sawyer. He was a farmer, owning and operating the same farm which his father bought of the Holland Land Purchase. Children: *2215. Jennie L., b. Dec. 11, 1860. 2216. Jessie E., b. April 2, 1863, d. Jan. 18, 1883. 2217. Frank E., b. Oct. 6, 1871; he is engaged in the grain and produce business in Middleport, N....

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Tuscarora Tribe

Tuscarora Indians, Tuscarora Nation (Skurū’rěn’, ‘hemp gatherers,’ the Apocynum cunnabinum, or Indian hemp, being a plant of many uses among the Carolina Tuscarora; the native form of this appellative is impersonal, there being no expressed pronominal affix to indicate person, number, or gender). Formerly an important confederation of tribes, speaking languages cognate with those of the Iroquoian linguistic group, and dwelling, when first encountered, on the Roanoke, Neuse, Taw (Torhunta or Narhontes), and Pamlico Rivers., North Carolina.

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Osteological Remains

“In the town of Cambria, six miles west of Lockport, a Mr. Hammon, who was employed with his boy in hoeing corn, in 1824, observed some bones of a child, exhumed. No farther thought was bestowed upon the subject for a time, for the plain of the Ridge was supposed to have been the site of an Indian village, and this was supposed to be the remains of some child who had been recently buried there. Eli Bruce, hearing of the circumstance, proposed to Mr. Hammon that they should repair to the spot, with suitable instruments, and endeavor to find some relics. The soil was a light loam, which would be dry and preserve bones for centuries without decay. A search enabled them to come to a pit but a slight distance from the surface. The top of the pit was covered with small slabs of the Medina sandstone, and was twenty-four feet square, four and a half feet deep, planes agreeing with the four cardinal points. It was filled with human bones of both sexes and ages. They dug down at one extremity and found the same layers to extend to the bottom, which was the dry loam, and from their calculations, they deduced that at least four thousand souls had perished in one great massacre. In one skull two flint arrow-heads were found, and many had the appearance...

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Biography of Green Arnold

GREEN ARNOLD. – One of the earliest pioneers of the country lying east of the Cascade Mountains is the gentleman whose name heads this sketch. He was born in Niagara county, New York, in 1919, and received his education at his native place. In 1833, he moved to Michigan with his parents, where he remained until 1850, when hearing of the wonderful stories of the rich discoveries of gold in California, he buckled on his armor of faith and started across the plains, landing in Hangtown (now Placerville) on the 6th day of August of the same year. He remained in California till June 1, 1851, and then returned to Michigan, where he remained till 1852. He then recrossed the plains, landing in Milwaukee, Oregon, in October of the same year, where he went into the hotel business, and remained there until May, 1853, when he went to Champoeg. Here he again went into the hotel business, remaining until July, when he went to The Dalles, and from thence to Butter Creek, on the old emigrant trail in Umatilla county, with a pack train of goods, for the purpose of trading with the Indians and the emigrants then en route to the Willamette valley from across the plains. He remained at Butter Creek until October, when he returned to Champoeg, and in the spring of 1854, returned to Eastern...

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Biography of Daniel Chaplin

DANIEL CHAPLIN. – The subject of this sketch was born in Niagara county, New York, in 1823. He was educated in his native place, and became a surveyor, removing to Michigan. Honest, upright and much respected, he was one of those men of broad ideas and indefatigable energy who create prosperity for any community in which they settle. Having heard much of Oregon, its boundless resources and delightful climate, he crossed the plains in 1854, settling near Champoeg in Marion county. From there he moved to where Sheridan, in Yamhill county, now stands, and thence to Dayton, Yamhill county. In the spring of 1862, he located in La Grande, Union county, and built the first house in that place. Through his efforts, he succeeded in having the land-office for Eastern Oregon located there, and for fifteen consecutive years held the position of receiver of the land-office, when he resigned on account of the accumulation of other business on his hands. The arduous duties of this office were conducted by him with admirable promptness and honesty; and the settlers who came to transact business with the office were always treated with great consideration. In 1864 he was elected to the legislature of Oregon, and gave entire satisfaction to his constituents. In 1865 he, in conjunction with Green Arnold, established the present water system of La Grande, and laid the first...

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Biography of Captain Joseph Kellogg

CAPTAIN JOSEPH KELLOGG. – The old People’s Transportation Company of the Willamette has a record in the annals of early navigation scarcely less glorious than that of the Oregon Steam Navigation Company of the Columbia. Of this company, Captain Kellogg was one of the originators. The Kelloggs are of old revolutionary stock, the father, Orrin Kellogg, having been born at St. Albans, Vermont, in 1790. He was married to Miss Margaret Miller, in Canada, in 1811. In 1812 they went to Canada; and, the war between Great Britain and the United States breaking out, they as Americans were not allowed to return until after hostilities had ceased. While thus detained, their oldest boy Joseph was born, the day being June 24, or St. John’s day. By action of Congress this child, in common with others in like circumstances, was still regarded as a native citizen of our Nation. After the war was over, the Kelloggs moved back across the border and settled near where Lockport, New York, now stands, but soon moved farther west to Ohio, and made a home upon the Maumee river. Here young Joseph grew up, and in 1844 married Miss Estella Bushnell, a young lady of noble character, who was born February 22d, – Washington’s birthday, – 1818, at Litchfield, New York, and who moved to Ohio in 1820. In 1847, with his father’s family,...

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Biographical Sketch of John Robert Stilts

(III) John Robert (2), son of Thomas Henry and Sarah (Parks) Stilts, was born February 8, 1858. He was educated in the common schools and at Union Academy, Canandaigua, New York. He engaged in farming in the town of Hopewell for a time, and for two years was a salesman for S. G. Lewis, who had an extensive grocery business in Bath, New York. Subsequently he was clerk in the store of M. J. King, a prominent merchant of Hartland, Niagara county, New York. In 1896 Mr. Stilts purchased of Charles Moore his general store at Chapin, New York, and he has built up a large and flourishing business there. He has demonstrated exceptional ability in business and has taken rank among the substantial merchants of this section. Having a kind and generous disposition, he has made many personal friends and enjoys the esteem of the entire community. In politics he is a Democrat. He has been justice of the peace for three consecutive terms, elected on the Democratic ticket in a Republican stronghold, and he has been a capable and efficient magistrate and member of the town board. He is a member of Lodge No. 365, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Canandaigua. He married, March 15, 1893, Hattie E. Deuel, of Niagara county, New York, daughter of Alfred and Mary (Height) Deuel. Children: Paul D., born October...

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