Location: Newman Illinois

Biographical Sketch of George White

George White, the well known implement dealer and auctioneer of Newman, was born near Glasgow, Barren County, Kentucky, August 18, 1842, and is a son of M. L. and Mary (Biby) White. Middleton White was born in Barren County, Kentucky and moved to Edgar County, Illinois, where he was married. His wife was also from near Glasgow. Kentucky. ‘They are both dead and buried in the Paris cemetery. George White came to Newman and located in business in about 1874, since which time his business has steadily grown until he is known as one of the most successful and extensive implement dealers in the entire County. He also handles the Mitchell wagon and several makes of buggies and carriages. His sales run from $25,000 to $35,000 annually. In 1844 Mr. White was united in marriage to Miss Della Clark, who is a native of Kentucky. They have two children: Henry W., who will graduate from the Chicago Homeopathic School of Medicine in March, 1901, and Fred, who is in business with his father. George White has here held the office of township supervisor and while he resided in Edgar County held the same office. In 1861 he volunteered in Company E, Twelfth Illinois Infantry and served through the entire Civil war. During the month of February especially his services are in great demand as a public auctioneer. He is...

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Biography of T. W. Swigart

T. W. Swigart, the leading harness dealer and one of the most successful business men in Newman and Douglas County, was born in Carroll County, Maryland, in sight of A Westminister, July 3, 1831, and was a son of Joseph Swigart. When nine years of age T. W. Swigart removed with his parents to Seneca County, Ohio, where he spent a large portion of his life on a farm. From the years 1848 to 1851 he devoted his time to learning the trade of harness maker at Bellefontaine, Ohio. He was a young man of good habits and of splendid mechanical turn of mind; he learned the trade thoroughly and soon became a first-class work-man. In the year 1852 he removed to Attica, Indiana, where he resided and worked at his trade successfully up to the year 1870, when he went to Princeton, Illinois. There he met Miss Sarah Jane Martin, who, in 1871, became his wife. In the same year he came to Danville, Illinois, where he followed his trade until the month of February, 1873, when he came to Newman and succeeded Speelman & Ogden in the harness business. During his residence in Newman he has become one of the most successful business men in the city and has accumulated quite a lot of property. In politics he is thoroughly independent and there is very little of...

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Biography of Isaac Skinner

Isaac Skinner was born in Vermillion County, Indiana, January 5, 1829, and is a son of Joseph Skinner, who was among the earliest settlers in the neighborhood of Newman, coming, in 1839, from Vermillion County, Indiana, and settling along the timber a mile and a half southwest of where Newman now is. There were no schools in the vicinity when he first came to the County. He worked for his father until of age and then engaged in farming on rented land. In about 1853 he had saved money enough to enter one hundred and sixty acres of land. His mother, whose maiden name was Polly Gaston, was a daughter of Thomas Gaston, who lived in Meigs County, Ohio, and probably was a native of Canada. His father, Joseph, was born in Maine. His grandmother, Sarah Gaston, was born on the St. Lawrence River, while her parents were held captives by the Indians. Isaac Skinner was reared on a farm and received the limited school advantages that were common in that day. He was first a Whig and since the birth of the Republican party has been identified with that organization. He has been three times married. First, in February, 1859 he married Miss Mahala Drake, who died in 1865. His second wife was Mrs. Mary Hill, whose maiden name was Lewis; her death occurred in 1869. His third...

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Biographical Sketch of W. W. Pepper

W. W. Pepper, a popular lawyer and a successful young business man, was born on a farm seven miles south of Newman May 24, 1866, and is the eldest of seven children born to Dudley H. and Nancy Liston Pepper. His father was a native of Kentucky and resides at Oakland. Mr. Pepper received his early education in the public schools of Oakland and afterward took a three-years’ course in the University of Illinois in Champaign. After leaving the university he took a two-years’ law course at the Northwestern University at Evanston and was graduated with honor in 1893, shortly afterward being admitted to the bar. On June 28, 1890, Mr. Pepper married Miss Nora Hinds, of Hindsboro. In March, 1894, Mr. Pepper located in Newman and commenced the practice of law. He became at once deservedly popular and in May, 1895, was chosen city attorney, which office he filled with due honor until the expiration of his time. He was re-elected to the same office, but resigned to look after his other business. It can be truly said of him that he is a man peculiarly after his own style. He has no model and seeks after none, save that which is the creation of his own mind. Starting out in life as he did, without means, perseverance and energy constituted his only capital. He entered his profession...

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Biography of Ira M. Mulliken

Ira M. Mulliken, junior member of the well-known firm of Barr & Mulliken and one of the rising young business men of Newman, was born in Champaign County, Illinois, December 17, 1865. His father, James W. Mulliken, was a native of Johnson County, Indiana, and removed to Champaign County in about 1852. His mother Catherine was a daughter of Rev. Samuel F. Miller, who was horn in 1815, and at present resides in Arcola. (See sketch of W. H. Bush, of Hindsboro.) In about 1868 the father of I. M. Mulliken removed to a farm near Hindsboro, where the latter remained until he arrived at the age of twenty-one years, when he went to Arcola to reside, and there worked at the carpenter’s trade. He attended Lee’s academy at Loxa, Illinois, for six months, then subsequently attended the embalming college at Indianapolis. From 1893 to June 1, 1896, he was a member of the undertaking firm of Mike, Miller & Co., at Charleston, Illinois. In the latter year he removed to Newman to accept a partnership with James Barr (see sketch). On September 4, 1893, he was married to Miss Ida A., a daughter of John W. Allison, of Arcola. They have one child, a daughter, Frances Marie. He is a member and noble grand of the I. O. O. F. elder iii the Christian Church, and superintendent of...

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Biographical Sketch of J. A. McGown

J. A. McGown, a most successful business man and a typical farmer residing in Newman Township, was born in Edgar County, Illinois, March 30, 1832, and is a son of John and Olive Blackman, who were natives of Kentucky and New York respectively. His father emigrated to Edgar County, where he resided up to his death, which occurred April 18, 1882. His mother died in 1892. J. A. McGown was reared to manhood a farm in his native County and in about 1875 located in Newman Township, where he now resides. He owns four hundred and seventy-two acres of highly cultivated land and one of the most magnificent residences in the County. He farms on business principles and has made himself independent in a financial way by his careful and methodical way of doing things. On November 22, 1881, he was united in marriage to Miss Martha C. Todd, and to their marriage have been born five children: Florence, Olive, Grace, Arthur and Anne. Our subject has held the office of road commissioner for nine years, and twenty-one years out of the twenty-five he has resided in Newman Township he has been school director and is greatly interested in the success of education. In 1898 he built his new house. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Order of...

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Biography of Oliver O. Hockett

Oliver O. Hockett, one of the younger members of the medical fraternity of Douglas County, and one of the leading men in the social, professional and educational life of Newman, was born in Paris, Edgar County, Illinois, March 2, 1866. He was graduated from the high school of Paris in 1882 and subsequently entered the state university at Champaign, where he remained for three years. He then took up the study of medicine with Dr. M. P. Smith, with whom he remained until he entered Chicago Hahnemann College, from which well known institution he was graduated in the class of 1880, and the following year he spent in the Hahnemann hospital. In March, 1890, he came to Newman and opened out in the general practice of medicine, and has succeeded far beyond his expectations. He is skilled and successful, and although having been in Newman but a few years, he enjoys one of the most extensive and lucrative practices in the County. He is a member of the Hahnemann Medical Society, contributes to the medical journals and keeps himself thoroughly in touch with the advancements being made in his profession. As a diagnostician in his profession, as well as in his judgment of human nature, he would pass muster in any community. Dr. Hockett is a son of Mahlon and Mary (Kimble) Hockett, natives of Vermilion and Edgar counties...

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Biography of James P. Heaton

James P. Heaton, who was a prominent citizen of Newman and a member of its board of education, was born August 16, 1845, and died March 14, 1897, aged fifty-one years, six months and twenty-eight clays. He was a native of Greene county, Pennsylvania, where his early youth was passed among the picturesque hills and scenery of that mountainous region. He was a son of William and Mary Heaton. At the age of sixteen years he came to Illinois and located on the Ridge, four miles north of Newman. At that time there was no church building in that section and in 1869 when the Cumberland Presbyterians built their church he contributed liberally toward its construction and helped in the good cause in various ways. In 1872 he joined the Methodist church, and when the M. E. church on the Ridge was built he and his brothers contributed largely toward its erection, upon ground donated by their father, who located on the Ridge sometime during the ’50s and entered a tract of land of 1,400 acres. He afterwards lived in Edgar county from 1873 until 1885, when he moved to Newman and lived there until his death in 1897. James Heaton was not long in becoming one of the most influential and prosperous citizens in his neighborhood. In 1871 he bought a tract of land now known as the...

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Biographical Sketch of Frank W. Hammett

Frank W. Hammett, cashier of the First National Bank of Tuscola, and one of the County’s young men of recognized ability, was born on a farm in Camargo Township. Douglas County, Illinois, February 12, 1 862. (See sketch of his father, James R. Hammett.) Mr. Hammett grew to manhood on his father’s farm and was principally educated in the University of Illinois. For some years after leaving college he was engaged in the manufacture of tiling at Camargo and Long View. In March, 1391, be accepted the position of book-keeper in the First National Bank of Tuscola, and was promoted to cashier of the same bank in August, 1898. He is a Knight Templar in Masonry; is a member of one of the oldest and most prominent families in the County, and will undoubtedly make his mark in the business world. He owns one hundred and sixty acres of land in Newman...

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Biography of Albert F. Fidler

Albert F. Fidler is one of the self-made and highly successful young farmers and business men of the County, and is a son of Levi Fidler, who was born April 28, 1819, in Berks County, Pennsylvania, Albert F.’s grandfather, Samuel, was a native of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and was of Dutch ancestry. Adam Fidler (great-grandfather), who came originally from Germany, was the founder of this branch of the Fidler family in America. Our subject’s grandfather, Samuel Fidler, fought in the war of 1812, and his great-grandfather, Adam, in the war of the Revolution. Samuel Fidler was a brick plasterer and con-tractor by trade, and was married to a daughter of Valentine Showalter, who was born in Pennsylvania and was descended from German ancestry. Levi Fidler was reared to manhood in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, until he became of age, when, in 1840, he emigrated west and settled in Union County, Indiana, and in 1861 located in what is now Newman township, Douglas County. He learned the carpentering business, at which he was engaged up to 1861, when he bought what is now known as the Thomas H. Smith farm, one of the finest in the County. He kept this farm until 1885, when he sold it. In 1842 Levi Fidler wedded Mary Ann Hessler, a native of Bourbon Township and a daughter of John and Mary (Thomas) Hessler, who were formerly...

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Biography of Edward W. Calvin

Edward W. Calvin, the leading druggist and owner of both livery stables of Newman, was born in Wayne County, Illinois, December 21, 1860. He is a son of Dr. J. W. Calvin, who was born in Kentucky in 1829, and he the son of Hiram Calvin, who was a native of Virginia. His father was a graduate of Rush Medical College. He married Sarah Brown, of New Buffalo, Michigan, whose death occurred some twenty years ago. He has practiced at various places, was at Newman one year and is at present in active and successful practice at Toledo, Ohio. E. W. Calvin has for several years extensively engaged in buying and selling horses and has been remarkably successful in all business enterprises in which he has been interested. In June, 1897, he opened out in the drug business and keeps on hands one of the most complete assortments of drugs found in a first-class drug store. In 1889 he was united in marriage to Miss Emma Smith, of Vermilion County. They have one child, Oka McCrea. Mrs. Calvin is a daughter of Michael Smith, who was born in Vermilion County, Illinois. Her mother was Mary Ann Snapp. She was a daughter of George Snapp, a native of Richmond, Virginia, He was a carriage maker by trade and after working some time at his trade in Richmond he removed to...

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Biographical Sketch of George W. Brock

George W. Brock, one of the reliable and representative farmers of Newman Township, residing within the corporate limits of the city of Newman, was born twelve miles southwest of Crawfordsville, Indiana, September S, 1846. His father, Seth Brock, was a native of Warren County, Ohio. He was a carpenter by trade and farmed also, owning farms in Wayne and Montgomery counties: he later removed to Mason County, Illinois. He was a strong pro-slavery man, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; was born in 1813 and died in 1873. He wedded Mary A. Palmer, who was a daughter of Jesse Palmer, a native of North Carolina, but who be-came one of the early settlers of Indiana. Elijah Brock (grandfather) was born in Ohio. George W. Brock was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools. At the age of sixteen years, on account of a severe spell of sickness, he lost the use of his right side. He married at Camp Butler, Miss Malinda Vanhook, daughter of Thomas and Matilda (Mann) Vanhook, and the result of this union was one child living, Ada Lucy, aged fifteen years, and three dead : Phillip L., Harry C. and Ethel Ellen. Mrs. Brock, who was a most estimable woman, died February 16, 1899. She was a devoted member of the Christian Church at Newman and her loss was deeply...

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McQueen, Melinda Catherine Cochran – Obituary

In last week’s issue of the paper, we announced that Mrs. J. P. McQueen had suffered a stroke of paralysis on the 8th of April and that she was in critical condition at the time of going to press on Thursday, being in an unconscious condition. She remained in that condition until relieved by death, the messenger coming about 8 o’clock Friday evening [April 12, 1918]. The deceased had been a resident of Newman for the past twenty-eight years and prior to removal here had lived on a farm in South Prairie, where she had a large circle of warm friends. She was in her usual good health when stricken by paralysis and her death was a great shock to the whole community. The funeral rites took place at the Christian Church, in this city, Sunday afternoon, at 2 o’clock, conduced by Rev. F. O. Fannon, who gave a very fine eulogy. Music on the occasion was rendered by a quartet composed of Mrs. A. J. Coley, Miss Gladys Tressenriter, Messrs. F. L. White and M. S. Smith with Mrs. C. E. Douglas presiding at the piano. The solo, “Shadows,” was very touchingly sung by M. S. Smith. The floral offerings were beautiful attesting the high esteem to which the deceased was held by her relatives and friends. A large concourse of people gathered at the church to pay...

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McQueen, Joshua P. – Obituary

Newman Man Takes Own Life With Poison. Mr. Joshua P. McQueen Committed Suicide Thursday Evening Of Last Week By Taking Concentrate Lye And Carbolic Acid-Funeral Held Saturday Afternoon. The funeral rites took place at the late home on Kings Street, Saturday afternoon, at 3 o’clock, conducted by Rev. F. O Fannon, pastor of the Christian church, and were largely attended by relatives and friends. Music on the occasion was rendered by a quartet composed by Mrs. F. S. Lydick, Mrs. George Roller, Messrs. F. L. White and M. S. Smith; and at the request of the family Mr. Smith sang the solo, “Shadows.” Interment took place the Newman Cemetery. The following obituary was read at the funeral: “Joshua P. McQueen, was the son of George P. and Harriett McQueen in Bartholomew County, Ind., Nov. 22, 1845. He was married to Belinda Catherine Cochran, March 10, 1868 [Malinda, March 12, 1870]. To this union were born two children, Mrs. S. J. Slaughter and Mrs. Hattie B. Davis, both residing in Newman. Mrs. McQueen departed this life after a brief illness in April, 1918.” Story Follows– Mr. Joshua P. McQueen committed suicide Thursday evening [August 14, 1919] of last week by taking a dose of Lewis Lye and carbolic acid, which he had mixed, in a cup. He took the poisoning about 6:45 o’clock p.m., and death relieved his suffering about...

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Cutsinger, William Edward – Obituary

William Edward Cutsinger, who resided about 6 miles north of Hindsboro, passed away on Monday evening, August 1st [1938] at his home, following an illness of several months duration. Death was due to a complication of diseases. The deceased was born on May 29, 1867, near Newman, and has lived here all his life. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. H. I. Cutsinger, who resided south of Newman for several years. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Zua [McQueen] Cutsinger, and three children, namely, William Cutsinger, of Chicago; Mrs. Hazel Wilson, of Gary, Ind.; and Miss Naomi Cutsinger, of Chicago. He also leaves 3 grand children ; and two brothers and two sisters, Mrs. Minnie Brown and Mrs. William English, of Danville, Ill.; Demp Cutsinger, of Oakland and Logan Cutsinger, of Newman. Funeral services were held at the First Christian Church in Newman, at 10 o’clock, Thursday morning, August 4th. Interment was in the Newman Cemetery, Rev. J. C. Weir, pastor of the church had charge of the services, which were largely attended by relatives and friends. He was united with the Christian Church, located at Newman, about 44 years ago [October 7, 1891]. Pallbearers were Harold McQueen, Russell Cutsinger, Herbie Martin, Oscar Downing, Glenn Cutsinger, and Vernon Jackson. Those in charge of the floral offerings were Mrs. Ina Cutsinger, Mrs. Oral Martin, Mrs. Belva Downing,...

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