Location: Newbury Vermont

Olcott Family of Norwich Vermont

Hon. Peter Olcott was born at Bolton, Connecticut, April 25, 1733; married Sarah, daughter of Peletiah Mills, Esq., of Windsor, Conn., October 11, 1759, and removed to that place in 1772. That year or the following one he came to Norwich, Vermont. He was the oldest of his parents’ four children (two sons and two daughters), and the only one of them to come to Norwich to reside. Mr. Olcott‘s name first appears in the town records of Norwich in 1773, when he was chosen one of the overseers of the poor, at the annual March meeting. He early took a leading part in public affairs in his new home. He was elected to the most important town offices, and soon came to be regarded as one of the leading men of the place. It is probable that he was a man of considerable means when he came to Norwich, which, united with his superior talents, gave him a commanding influence in the community. The next year (1774) the annual town meeting was held at his house, and such meetings continued to be so held until 1779, after which they were held at the meeting house, except in severe winter weather. Probably his influence was potent in fixing the location of the first meeting house very near to his residence and upon land which he gave for a site....

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Biography of Frank A. Jordan

Frank A. Jordan, a veteran of the Civil War, who is carrying on a thriving business as a stone cutter in Plainfield, N.H., was born in this town, April 19, 1840, son of Anthony W. and Mercy (Root) Jordan. It is known that some of his ancestors served in the Revolutionary War. His grandfather was James Jordan, who died May 10, 1860, aged eighty-two years. He was a native of Plainfield and a son of the first member of the family to settle here. James Jordan was a contractor for the construction of roads and bridges, and also carried on a farm. He married Waitte Kenyon, of Plainfield, born in January, 1782, and reared seven sons, namely-Anthony W.; William Riley, first, Raymond K.; Wardner; Lester; Kenyon; and Jarvis -none of whom are living. The majority of them were farmers; and all became heads of families except Kenyon, who died at the age of twenty years. William Riley Jordan, first, married a Miss Esther Spaulding, of Plainfield; and six of his eight children survive. Wardner, who was overseer of the poor farm for seventeen years, married Lucy Whittaker, of Grantham, N.H.; and of his four children two are living. Lester married Luzina Stone, and had a family of eight children, none of whom are living. Jarvis was Sergeant of Company C, Fifth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers, during the Civil War....

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Biography of Patrick H. Coney

In many ways the State of Kansas during the last half century had had no more interesting, patriotic, versatile figure than Patrick H. Coney of Topeka. He came to Kansas after making a brilliant record as a soldier in the Civil war. He had been extremely successful as a business man, and his interests as a business man have extended over a wide and diversified field. No man in the country had exhibited a more intense loyalty and devotion to the welfare of the veterans of the great struggle between the North and the South. Mr. Coney is a lawyer, had practiced in Topeka over thirty years, is also a vigorous writer, had been a publisher in his time, and had always made his private success subsidiary to the public welfare. He was born in Newbury, Vermont, March 10, 1848, a son of Luke and Honor Berry Coney. The genealogy of this family is traceable back to Laogare, ancestor of the Southern Hy Nials, a son of Nial of the Nine Hostages, Kings of Ireland in A. D. 379. His father, Luke Coney, was born in County Roscommon, Ireland, and emigrated to the United States in 1839. After living a time in Boston he moved to Vermont, where he married, and in 1850 went to Wayne County, New York. His later life was spent in Topeka, where he died...

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Biography of William G. Peach

WILLIAM G. PEACH. – There is no doubt but there should be special mention in this volume of the abiding chronicles of Union county, of the capable and venerable citizen, whose name appears at the head of this article, and it is with pleasure that we accord to him space for the epitome of an interesting and eventful career, since his abilities are worthy of such, and since his success has been achieved by meritorious effort, and since his character is upright, stanch, and worthy to be exemplified. Mr. Peach was born in the Green Mountain State, at Newbury, Orange county, on October 15, 1833, and there were spent the first nineteen years of his life. The school facilities were limited, and so our subject had the opportunity to attend school but three months in his life, which lack, however, he has amply made up for in personal research and extensive observation. At the budding age of nineteen, in company with two cousins, he embarked at New York for San Francisco, going via the isthmus route. The cost of a steerage ticket was one hundred and sixty dollars, while they paid ten cents per pound for transportation of their baggage across the isthmus. September 7 was the date they sailed from New York, and October 5 the day when they slipped through the Golden Gate, and beheld the Mecca...

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