Location: Nevada City California

Biographical Sketch of David H. Coulson

David H. Coulson, son of John D. Coulson, was born in Chariton County, Missouri, near the town of Keytesville, November 16, 1830. He remained in the place of his birth until he was about seven years of age when his father moved to Howard County, Missouri, where the family remained about two years. In 1839 the family came to Daviess County and settled in Union township. David remained at home until he was about twenty-one years of age. Mr. Coulson was engaged in farming in Union township, Daviess County, Missouri, for three years. He then moved to Liberty Township, where he remained one year. Removing a short distance from this place, he gave his attention for about eleven years to farming and stock-raising. Moving then to Sheridan township he purchased land in section thirty-five where he is now living. In 1860 Mr. Coulson went to Nevada City where he was engaged in mining about eighteen months. He returned home in 1862 when he was enrolled in the Home Guard Militia, and served at intervals during the war. Mr. Coulson was married, in 1852, to Miss Elizabeth J. McBrayer. They have had six children: Samuel D., Sarah M., Thomas R., May C., William B. and Charles...

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Biography of Solomon Hasbrouck

One of the best known pioneer settlers of the state of Idaho is Solomon Hasbrouck, who is now serving as clerk of the supreme court and is accounted one of the leading and influential citizens of Boise. He is numbered among the sons of the Empire state, his birth having occurred in New Paltz, Lister County, New York, on the 30th of May. 1833. He is a descendant of Holland Dutch ancestry, and at an early period in the history of the state the family was founded within its borders. Solomon P. Hasbrouck, the grandfather of our subject, was a prominent lumber manufacturer and merchant and carried on business in such an extensive scale and employed so great a force of workmen that he was called the “king of Centerville.” His son, Alexander Hasbrouck, father of our subject, was born in Centerville and there spent his entire life, passing away in 1894, at the age of eighty-six years. At the age of twenty-three he married Miss Rachel Elting, a native of his own County, and after that conducted a farm about three miles from Centerville for twenty-five years. He then moved to New York City, where for five years he was in business in Washington market. Then he came to Idaho and lived with his son Solomon until his decease. He and his wife were valued members of the...

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Biography of David Morey

David Morey, one of the pioneers of Redlands, was born in Perry County, Pennsylvania, in 1824. His father, Jacob Morey, moved to Delaware County, Ohio, at an early day, and took a farm out of the woods. He died there at the age of ninety years. His mother, Barbara (Jacobs) Morey, is still living, at the advanced age of ninety-two years. The subject of this sketch left home at the age of fourteen to learn the cabinet trade. He worked at this trade in Marysville, and in 1842 went to Indianapolis, where he remained until 1845. He then went to Lexington, Kentucky, and in 1850 started from St. Louis across the plains to California. They left Independence, Missouri, May 10, 1850, and were on the way four months to Nevada City, California. Mr. Morey, like many others, engaged in mining from 1850 to 1858. He then went to Scottsburg, Oregon, where he worked at the cabinet trade and ship-joining on river steamers. Then he went to Columbia River and helped built steamers. After this he came back to the Cascades and built the steamer “Iris;” then to Puget Sound, to Victoria, and finished the steamer “Alexandria,” for William Moore. He then went to Umpqua River and built the steam sawmill and the schooners, “William F. Brown,” “Pacific” and “Mary Cleveland.” In 1870 he went to San Francisco, and from...

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Biography of Hon. Jesse B. Ball

HON. JESSE B. BALL. – Twenty miles up the Skagit river, in the heart of one of the richest timber sections of Washington, is Sterling, a thriving young city, with high hopes for the future. The founder of the place is the man whose name appears at the head of this sketch. Mr. Ball is a pioneer of 1853, having crossed the plains in that year and stopped at Downieville, where he worked a short time for a company of miners, – his only work for anybody but himself on this coast. His career has had the restless activity and energy characteristic of our people. At Nevada City and other points he was engaged in mining for two years. At Oroville he was in the stock business for nine years. Taking advantage of the no-fence law, he then spent three years at Honey Lake valley, in the same pursuit. In 1867 he came to Puget Sound, and in 1868 farmed for a year on the Nisqually bottoms. Logging and lumbering near Steilacoom engaged his attention until 1878. It was in that year that he came to Whatcom (now Skagit), and started the town of Sterling. Here he kept a store and logging camp. A year ago he sold his store and his timber lands, and confined himself to farming and real estate, owning several sixty and seventy acre tracts...

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Biography of Hon. A. R. Burbank

HON. A.R. BURBANK. – Mr. Burbank, a founder of society and business upon the Pacific coast, was born April 15, 1817, near Cincinnati, Ohio. He is the son of Major Daniel Burbank, an American officer in the war of 1812, who came with his family in an open boat down the Alleghany and Ohio rivers as early as 1814, and made a home on its northern shore near the present metropolis. The Major was from Williamstown, Massachusetts. His wife, Margeret Pinchen, was from Atica, New York. In 1818 a further move was made in the family boat down the Ohio to Shanetown, Illinois, thence to McLanesburgh, and in 1825 to Exeter, Morgan county, in the same state. Here, at the age of nine, A.R. Burbank, the subject of this sketch, who was the youngest of a family of six sons and five daughters, met with the loss of his mother by death, and six years later was called upon to bid his father the last farewell, and follow his body to its resting place in the grave. Having received very careful religions and moral training from his parents, and having acquired habits of thrift and industry, he began while still a boy to make a career and carve out for himself a fortune. As a clerk in a store he acquired an insight into and a grasp upon business...

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Ham, Verdice Van Leuven Mrs. – Obituary

Verdice Ham, 83, of Nevada City, Calif., a former Baker City resident, died March 27, 2003, at her daughter’s home in Nevada City. Her funeral will be at 1 p.m. Tuesday at the Coles Funeral Home, 1950 Place St. Bishop Greg Baxter, 1st Ward of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, will conduct the service. Vault interment will be at Mount Hope Cemetery. Visitations will be from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesday at the funeral home. Verdice Ham was born Dec. 16, 1919, at Weiser, Idaho, to Andrew L. and Ida Jackson Van Leuven. She was the youngest of 15 children. At the age of 3, she moved with her family to Baker City where she spent the rest of her childhood. At the age of 18, she married Beryl Ham on April 24, 1938, at Weiser. As the wife of a logger, she spent most of her married life moving around the state following the logging industry. She was widowed in March of 1957. The next 10 years were devoted to raising her seven children. When her youngest was around 10 years old, she went to work at the Oregon Trail Motel as a maid. Shortly after that, she started working at Emrich Furniture where she stayed for several years and then went to work for Leo Adler. After retiring in 1984, she moved to California...

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Kennedy, Dale Dee – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Dale Dee Kennedy, 40, of Baker City died Dec. 9, 2001, at his home. Disposition was by cremation. There will be a family gathering later. Dale was born at Nevada City, Calif., on Feb. 19, 1961. He lived at Grass Valley, Calif., until he was 26. Dale was known for his kind and generous heart. He never met a stranger. Dale enjoyed cruising around town with his wife, and honking at his friends. From the time he could walk he loved to go fishing. Dale also enjoyed yard sales and was a CB enthusiast. One of the highlights of his young adult life was driving truck for a traveling carnival where he was known as “Carney Joe.” The greatest joy of his life began when he married his wife, Dawn Seickman, on Nov. 5, 1995. Survivors include his wife of six years, Dawn Kennedy; his parents, Stanley and Cynthia Kennedy of Reno, Nev.; his grandmother, Inez Kennedy of Nevada City, Calif.; four brothers and one sister, Dean Kennedy and his wife, LaNora, of Juneau, Alaska, Russell Kennedy and his wife, Leisa, of Baker City, his twin brother, Danny Kennedy, and his wife, Kathy, of Las Vegas, Nev., Rick Kennedy of Grass Valley, Calif., and Stephanie Martin-Kennedy of Auburn, Calif.; 13 nieces and nephews and nine grandnieces and grandnephews. He was preceded in death by his mother,...

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Biography of Charles Trumbull Hayden

Charles Trumbull Hayden, whose name is linked with the early history of Arizona, was born in Windsor, Connecticut, April 4th, 1825. When eighteen years old he taught school in New Jersey, and afterwards near New Albany, Indiana, and in St. Louis, Missouri. In 1848 he loaded a wagon with merchandise, and left Independence, Missouri, for Santa Fe, New Mexico, where he marketed his goods and returned in the fall. He continued in business at Independence for some time, but when the gold excitement began in 1849, he outfitted a train of ox teams, and started over the Santa Fe Trail. He arrived in Santa Fe late in 1849, and met some parties from California, who bought his outfit, consisting of fourteen wagons loaded with supplies, each drawn by six yoke of oxen. He then returned to Missouri to purchase another stock of goods and establish himself in business in Santa Fe. He was a passenger upon the first Overland Stage to Tucson in 1858, to which place he moved his stock of goods from Santa Fe and established himself in business there. He engaged in contracting with the Government for the furnishing of supplies to the soldiers and did a large freighting business to the mines, hauling supplies in, and ore out. He had many freight teams and brought his merchandise in these early days from Port Ysabel on...

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