Location: Muscatine Iowa

Biography of Edmund Raymond Kinsey

Edmund Raymond Kinsey, president of the board of public service of St. Louis and identified in a professional capacity with the public interests of the city since 1912, was born in Muscatine, Iowa, January 24, 1873, his parents being William M. and Lucy Loretta (Chapin) Kinsey. In the paternal line he is descended from one of the old and distinguished American families that has figured prominently in public affairs throughout the history of the nation. A member of this family was one of the first justices of. the supreme court of Pennsylvania and his portrait is over one of the three chairs in the old courtroom in Independence Hall at Philadelphia, in the room occupied by the supreme court when that city was the national capital. The first representative of the family in America came to the new world with William Penn, settling in Philadelphia, and through many generations the family has been connected with the Society of Friends or Quakers. William M. Kinsey, a lawyer by profession, also became a lawmaker, serving as a member of the fifty-first congress from the tenth district of Missouri. He was judge of the St. Louis circuit court for a period of twelve years, from 1904 until 1916, and in many ways has left the impress of his individuality upon the legal records of the state. At the time of the Civil...

Read More

Biography of Col. Homer F. Fellows

In these days of money-making, when life is a constant struggle between right and wrong, it is a pleasure to lay before an intelligent reader the unsullied record of an honorable man. To the youthful it will be a useful lesson, an incentive to honest industry. Col. Homer F. Fellows is acknowledged by all to be one of Springfield’s most public-spirited and honorable citizens. He has been largely identified with the public enterprises of that city, is a promoter of its improvements and the real founder of one of the largest mechanical industries in this part of the State. He springs from old Colonial stock, and is of English-Puritan extraction, two brothers of that name, John and Drane, having emigrated from England in old Colonial times. John Fellows, grandfather of our subject, was born in the town of Canaan, Conn., where his ancestors had settled, and served in the Revolutionary War, fighting bravely for independence. His wife, whose maiden name was Edna Deibold, was a native of Canaan, and came of French extraction. After marriage this worthy couple moved to Luzerne County, Penn., and settling on a farm went actively to work to make many improvements in their new home. Indians were very plentiful at that time. About 1820 Mr. Fellows moved with his family to Tioga County, Penn., and there he passed the remainder of his days, dying...

Read More

Biography of Franklin P. Ake

The historian Bancroft has said. “Taken altogether Idaho is the most grand, wonderful, romantic and mysterious part of the domain enclosed within the federal Union;” and no one who has ever looked upon its beautiful and off times sublime scenery will doubt that it rightly deserves to be called “The Gem of the Mountains.” Its natural resources are probably more diversified than any other state can show, for in the midst of its high hills, rich in their mineral de-posits, are fertile valleys affording ample opportunity to the agriculturist, horticulturist and stock farmer. The owner of one of the finest ranches and most beautiful homes in Elmore county is Franklin P. Ake, a man of excellent business ability, who has been prominently connected with many interests of this region, and now in addition to the capable management of his own affairs is acceptably serving as the custodian of the county exchequer in the capacity of county treasurer. Mr. Ake, whose residence is pleasantly situated about four miles from Mountain Home, was born in Muscatine, Iowa, July 6, 1857. During the colonial epoch in our country’s history his ancestors left their homes in Holland and became residents of Pennsylvania, taking part in many of the events which form the annals of that state, and also participating in the war of the Revolution. John H. Ake the father of our subject...

Read More

Biography of V. W. Sander

Success is not always the result of fortunate circumstances, but is the outcome of labor and business ability, and the one who achieves success along industrial or commercial lines must be possessed of energy, strong determination and executive force. Such are the qualities which have won for Mr. Sander a leading position among the merchants of Idaho and gained for him the presidency of the Idaho Mercantile Company, Limited, of Coeur d’Alene. A native of Germany, he was born February 4, 1857, and is a son of Henry and Henrietta (Othmer) Sander, also natives of the same country. In 1860 they came with their family to the New World, taking up their residence in Muscatine, Iowa, where the parents died. The subject of this review was only three years of age at the time of the emigration to America. He was reared in Muscatine and acquired his education in the common and high schools of that city, after which he entered upon his business career as a clerk, spending three years as a salesman in the drygoods store of General Gordon, of that city. In 1877 he made his way westward to California, where he was employed as a clerk in a general store for two years, and in 1879 he removed to the territory of Washington, where he secured a ranch, upon which he made his home until...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Oliver Farrar Emerson

Emerson, Oliver Farrar; university professor; born, Traer, Ia., May 24, 1860; son of Oliver and Maria Farrar Emerson; A. B., Iowa College, 1882, A. M., 1885; Ph. D., Cornell University, 1891; married, Annie L. Logan, of St. Louis, Sept. 24, 1891; supt. schools, Grinnell, Ia., 1882-1884, Muscatine, Ia., 1884-1885; prin. Academy of Iowa College, 1885-1888; Goldwin Smith fellow in English, 1888-1889, instru. in English, 1889-1891; asst. prof. rhetoric and English philology, 1892-1896, Cornell University; prof. English, Western Reserve University, since 1896; member Modern Language Ass’n America, American Dialect Society (pres., 1905). Author: History of the English Language, 1894; A Brief History of the English Language, 1896; Middle English Reader, 1905; Outline History of the English Language, 1906. Editor: Johnson’s Rasselas, 1905; Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Edward Gibbon, 1898; Poems of Chancer, 1911. Contributor to Modern Language Notes, Dialect Notes, Publications of Modern Language Ass’n, Modern Philology, Journal of Germanic Philology, Anglia,...

Read More

Biography of Freeman E. Nipps

Freeman E. Nipps is one of the veteran railroad men of Kansas. Like many who have found success in that army of industrial workers, he began at a country station and as a telegraph operator. For more than a quarter of a century he has been the agent of the Missouri Pacific Railway at Topeka. Unlike many railway men, he has at the same time identified himself closely with local affairs, and at the present time his name is familiarly known throughout Shawnee County as chairman of the board of commissioners. Though most of his life has been spent within the borders of Kansas, Mr. Nipps was born at Muscatine, Iowa, July 14, 1865. A few years later his parents removed to Boone, Iowa. There he attended the public schools until he was fourteen, and at that time he accompanied his parents to Kansas. Mr. Nipps is a son of Jacob and Josephine (Pfeifer) Nipps. His father was a man of considerable prominence in Phillips County, Kansas. Before coming to this state he had enlisted in an Ohio regiment during the Civil war, but continued illness prevented his taking an active part for any length of time in the struggle to preserve the Union. By trade he was a mechanic, but the greater part of his career was devoted to agriculture. In order to better provide for his growing...

Read More

Callaway, Roy D. – Obituary

Keating, Baker County, Oregon Roy D. Callaway, 84, Keating Star Route, an employee of the Oregon Lumber Co. in Baker for more than four decades, died Saturday, August 14, 1982, at St. Elizabeth Community Hospital. His funeral will be at 2 p.m. Wednesday at Grays West & Co. Pioneer Chapel. The Rev. Ralph Holcomb of the First Christian Church will officiate. Interment will follow at Mt. Hope Cemetery. Mr. Calloway was born may 13, 1898 in Muscatine, Iowa, the son of George and Mary Jane Allen Callaway. He moved as a young man to Baker County, where he and his family homesteaded in the Elk Creek area. He later went to work at the Oregon Lumber Company, where he was employed for 43 years. He had been retired for many years. Mr. Calloway married Ora Burris in Baker in 1927. Survivors include two sons, Ralph Calloway of Baker and Robert Calloway of Pilot Rock; four daughter, Dorothy Phillips, Roberta Graves, and Shirley Gwilliam, all of Baker, and Fern Wheeler of La Grande; 21 grandchildren and 23 great grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife, Ora, in 1955 and by a son, Ronald, in 1971, and two brothers and two sisters. The family suggests memorial contributions to the Shriner’s Hospital for Crippled Children in Portland through Grays West and Co. Pioneer Chapel. Source: Baker Democrat Herald, Baker City,...

Read More

Biography of John Edward Stewart

The business world of New England and the manufacturing stationers’ trade suffered an irretrievable loss in the passing of one of Springfield’s most substantial citizens, John Edward Stewart, president of the printing company which bears his name, a veteran officer of the Civil War, prominent Grand Army man and highly esteemed throughout the community for his personal worth and by his business connections for his high sense of honor and unimpeachable integrity. The city of his adoption and scene of his successful labors could ill afford to part with such a forceful character, loyal friend and kindly neighbor, who was in the best sense of the term a constructive element in the body politic. Mr. Stewart was blessed with an ancient and honorable ancestry, the surname Stewart being one of the oldest and most distinguished in Scottish and English history. Its members in all generations have been among the builders of the States where they have resided, contributing in valued measure to the economic, moral, social, and political foundations of England, Scotland and the United States, to which latter country pioneering representatives of the family came at a very early date. The Stewart line is traced to the time of Cromwell, to a branch of the family as ancient as the Clan Stewart of Scottish history. At the time of the Protectorate a branch of the family in the...

Read More

Biography of John Kimberland Scott

The subject of this sketch the present States Attorney of Rock Island County, was born in Muscatine, Iowa, on November 26, 1870. His parents were William W. Scott, now deceased, and Margaret (Hickey) Scott, the former of sturdy Scotch, and the later of keen, energetic Irish ancestry. Mr. Scott’s father served three years during the Civil War as a member of Company M, Eighth Iowa Volunteer Cavalry, and was for almost forty years a locomotive engineer on the Rock Island Railway, and for one term an alderman from the Seventh Ward of Rock Island. John K. Scott came to Rock Island County with his parents in 1875, having lived the first few years of his life in Muscatine and later in Brooklyn, Iowa. He attended the public schools of the City of Rock Island and graduated from the high school in the Class of ’89, being president of his class. He then entered the Rock Island post office, where he was employed as a letter carrier until September, 1893, when, having saved enough money to realize his cherished ambition, he resigned his position and entered the law department of the State University of Iowa. He graduated from that institution in 1895, as president of the law class of that year. Mr. Scott was for two years professionally associated with C. J. Searle, and in 1897 he was appointed by...

Read More

Biography of Martin Schoonmaker

Much has been written in this historical work of the banks and bankers of Rock Island and Moline. However, in estimating the financial strength of Rock Island County the banks and bankers of its smaller municipalities are deserving of very prominent mention, for they are the tributaries of larger financial institutions and have an important part in swelling the stream of the county’s prosperity. To the village bank comes the farmer from the surrounding countryside and deposits the golden fruits of his toil. From the proprietor of that bank its customers may ask and receive sound financial advice. He is their friend and adviser as well as their banker. The farm loan, that solid rock of financial investment, is placed with him, or is negotiated through some larger banking institution through his agency. Upon the stability and security of these smaller banks, as well as upon the honor and integrity of those in control of them, rests the whole superstructure of the confidence and trust reposed in them. With these thoughts in mind we are now to consider the life and character of Martin Schoonmaker, the banker at the Village of Reynolds in this county, one of Rock Island County’s most influential citizens. He was born October 21, 1834, in Green County, New York, his parents being Christian and Sylvia Schoonmaker. Both Mr. Schoonmaker’s parents were natives of this...

Read More

Biography of Elwin Elbert Parmenter

The life of a good and just man, and the memory of his noble, kindly deeds, are in themselves his true biography. In the life of such an individual the observer of human character may find both precept and example. He may find in such a life sermons that speak more eloquently and leave a deeper impression upon the heart than any human words. The simple goodness and unconscious influence of such a man is a benediction to all with whom he comes in daily contact. Such were the attributes of the late Judge Elwin E. Parmenter, a man highly esteemed and greatly beloved by all who knew him, a man of high integrity and broad charity, a man whose motto was the Golden Rule. He was born on a farm in Andalusia Township, Rock Island County, June 24, 1843, his parents being Lorenzo and Kezia Parmenter, one of the early families who settled in this county. He received his early education in the public schools of Muscatine, and here he fitted himself for entrance to the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he graduated from the law department. A short time after his graduation he entered upon the practice of his profession at Rock Island, which city was his home until his death. In 1872 he was elected state’s attorney for Rock Island County, and held this...

Read More

Biography of John E. Brooks

JOHN E. BROOKS. – John E. Brooks was born October 29,1822, at Canton, St. Lawrence county, State of New York. His father Cooper Brooks, and his mother, Sophia Brooks (formerly Tuttle), moved from Cheshire, New Haven, Connecticut, and settled at an early day in St. Lawrence county, making the trip with an ox-sled drawn by a yoke of cattle from state to state. To them were born six children, four boys and two girls. The entire family is now dead, except J.E. Brooks, the fifth, and Aniasa Brooks, the youngest of the family, who now live at McMinnville, Oregon. His father being a farmer, his boyhood days were spent in farming and in the dairy (his father being one of the first to engage in that business in the county), attending the district school a portion of the time during the winter months. In the fall of 1842, he attended the St. Lawrence Academy at Canton as a student. At the expiration of six months, he engaged in house carpentering and joiner work, to obtain means to further prosecute his studies. In the fall of 1843, he passed a very satisfactory examination before the board of school (sic)superintendents, receiving a first-class certificate, and for four months following was engaged as a teacher in one of the best district schools in the county. From this time till the spring of...

Read More

Biography of Robert Couch Kinney

ROBERT COUCH KINNEY. – Oregon will always treasure with respect and admiration the memory of the men and women who came in the days when the Pacific Northwest was the home of savage tribes, mountain men and a few traders, to plant homes and lay the foundation of an empire on the waters of the Columbia. They dared much when they accepted the roll of pioneers to the Pacific. Some became notable for success, and developed character that gave standing to the new state; for the constitution and early legislation of Oregon showed statesmanship seldom equaled in the erection of a commonwealth. Among those who preceded the gold excitement was Robert Couch Kinney, who illustrates the capacity of a new country to develop character and insure success. He was the son of a pioneer and nephew of another who went in early days to Illinois and inherited qualities necessary to success in a new country. Mr. Kinney was born in St. Clair county, Illinois, July 4, 1813. At the age of twenty-five he married Eliza Lee Bigelow, who survives him, and moved to Burlington, Iowa. He went boating and afterwards ran steamboats on the Mississippi with success, then conceived the idea of founding a city, and located and helped build Bloomington, now the prosperous city of Muscatine, Iowa. He engaged there in milling, and acquired a knowledge of that...

Read More

Biography of Samuel Kinney

SAMUEL KINNEY. – Samuel Kinney, a brother of Robert C. Kinney, was one of the founders of our early society in Oregon, and a man of unusual force and of marked worth. He was born in 1810 in the State of Illinois. He was brought up on a farm, acquiring nerve and muscle and an intrepid spirit, and gained the education of the times in his native district. He was early married to Miss Ann Maria Porter, who was also a native of Illinois, where she was born in 1814. Soon after his marriage, about 1832, he removed to Iowa, locating at Bloomington, now Muscatine, a city founded by his brother Robert. Here he was engaged for a time in teaming, and also with his brother in operating Vanetta & Deshler’s sawmill. His wife’s health being poor, however, and being himself possessed of an enterprising and adventurous spirit, he determined to find a new home in Oregon, and in 1847 made the trip across the plains. Little difficulty was experiences on the journey; and there was no trouble from the Indians except that near the Umatilla the Cayuses were found to be impudent, among other things making request to buy some of the girls, and even threatening to steal them. One saucy fellow went so far as to ride up and seize the eldest daughter in order to drag...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest