Location: Middleton Massachusetts

Early New England People

Sarah Titcomb over her years of study of various New England families had collected quite a bit of material of several early New England families. At the bequest of some of her friends, she prepared and published them in book form. When reading through the material I was impressed with the amount of material collected on each individual, and rather then a brief genealogical sketch, readers are provided an in-depth study of each early family: Ayer, Bartlett, Bradley, Chase, Dean, Dow, Dunster, Ellis, Fuller, Hope, Kilby, Martine, Les Dernier, Maverick, Mills, Montague, Pemberton, Pepperrell, Poore, Precott, Sewall, Longfellow, Spofford, Titcomb, Watmough, and Willard.

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Biography of Thomas Fuller

In 1638 THOMAS FULLER came from England to America upon a tour of observation, intending, after he should have gratified his curiosity by a survey of the wilderness world, to return. While in Massachusetts, he listened to the preaching of Rev. Thomas Shepard, of Cambridge, who was then in the midst of a splendid career of religious effort and eloquence, the echo of which, after the lapse of two centuries, has scarcely died away. Through his influence Thomas Fuller was led to take such an interest in the religion of the Puritan school, that the land of liturgies and religious formulas, which he had left behind, became less attractive to him than the ” forest aisles ” of America, where God might be freely worshiped. He has himself left on record a metrical statement of the change in his views which induced him to resolve to make his home in Massachusetts. These verses were collected by the Rev. Daniel Fuller of Gloucester from aged persons, who declare that the author was urged, but in vain, to publish them. Now, after the lapse of two centuries, we will favor the world with a few of them, which will serve as a sample: – “In thirty-eight I set my foot On this New England shore; My thoughts were then to stay one year, And here remain no more. But, by the...

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Biography of Timothy Fuller, Sr.

TIMOTHY FULLER, the sixth child and third son of Jacob Fuller, was born at Middleton, on the 18th of May, 1739. He entered Harvard University at the age of nineteen, and graduated in 1760. His name over that date is still (1859) seen on the corner-stone of one of the college buildings. He applied himself to theology, and in March, 1767, received from the church and town of Princeton, Mass., a nearly unanimous invitation to become their pastor, having previously supplied their pulpit for two years. Here he was ordained the first minister of Princeton, 9th September, 1767. In 1770 he married Sarah Williams, daughter of Rev. Abraham Williams of Sandwich, Mass. He was successful as a preacher, and his people were united in him till the war of the revolution broke out. He declared at the time, and ever afterwards, that he was friendly to the principles of the revolution, and anxiously desired that his country should be liberated from its dependence on the British crown; but he was naturally a very cautious man, and believed this result would be certain to come, if the country reserved itself for action till its strength was somewhat matured, and its resources in a better state of preparation. Resistance at the time he believed premature, and thought that we were hazarding all by too precipitate action. Such views, however, were by...

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Biography of John J. Ingalls

John J. Ingalls was a genius and one of the most versatile statesmen, scholars and writers which Kansas had produced. He was born at Middletown, Massachusetts, December 29, 1833, a son of Elias T. and Eliza (Chase) Ingalls, and a descendant of Edmond Ingalls, who, with his brother Francis, founded the town of Lynn, Massachusetts, in 1628. Mr. Ingalls graduated at Williams College, Massachusetts, in 1855, and two years later was admitted to the bar in his native county of Essex. In 1858 he came to Kansas and served as a member of the Wyandotte constitutional convention in 1859, in the following year being elected secretary of the territorial council. While secretary of the State Senate in 1861, at the first session of the Legislature, he submitted a design for a state seal, and in 1862 was elected to the State Senate. During the Civil war he served as judge advocate on the staff of Gen. George W. Deitzler, with the rank of lieutenant colonel, and in 1864 was nominated for lieutenant governor on the “Anti-Lane” ticket. Mr. Ingalls’ first election to the United States Senate, in 1873, as the successor of Samuel C. Pomeroy, followed one of the most sensational scenes which ever occurred in a nominating convention, and, as elsewhere narrated, marked Mr. Pomeroy’s permanent elimination from politics. He was twice re-elected and served in the Senate...

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