Location: Miami County KS

Biographical Sketch of Rev. William N. Nickell

William N. Nickell is a native of Monroe county, West Virginia, was born December 27, 1838, and is the son of John A. and Mary J. Nickell, both natives of West Virginia. The subject of this sketch received his early education in the common schools of Virginia, and completed it by an additional course of two and a half years at the Washington College, now Washington and Lee University, of Rockbridge county, Virginia. In May 1861, he enlisted in Company D, Twenty-seventh Regiment Virginia Confederate Infantry as a private, was soon promoted to sergeant, and sergeant-major of his regiment. He served two and a half years, was then engaged in carrying the Confederate mail until the close of the war. He was at the battles of Manassas, Winchester, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Culpepper Court House, and others. At the close of the war he began farming, and in 1866 moved to Miami county, Kansas, thence in 1869 to this county and settled where he now lives. In 1872 he went under the care of the Chillicothe Presbytery, as a candidate for the ministry in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and was licensed to preach in April, 1873, was ordained in 1875, and the same fall went back to Virginia; was there engaged in the ministry for three years, and then returned to this county. Since that time he has been engaged...

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Biography of Abraham Ellis

Abraham Ellis, for many years a resident of Miami County, was popularly known as “Bullet-Hole Ellis,” from the fact that for twenty-three years he carried a deep wound, almost in the center of his forehead, in which had originally been buried a bullet fired by the noted raider, William C. Quantrill. His recovery was one of the most remarkable in surgical annals, and the ball which inflicted the wound, as well as the twenty-seven pieces of froutal bone which were picked from his skull at the time, are among the remarkable exhibits displayed in the Army and Navy Medical Museum at Washington, D. C. Mr. Ellis was born in Green County, Ohio, April 22, 1815, and for many years in his earlier manbood was a successful teacher, but his health compelled him to cling to the soil. In September, 1857, he left Ohio and located in Miami County, six miles from the Missouri line. He was therefore in the very hotbed of the Border warfare, and his strong free-soil sentiments and capacity for organization made him a personal friend, a co-worker and a tristed lieutenant of John Brown. In October, 1858, he was elected a member of the Territorial Legislature and in the following December a representative of the lower house of the First State Legislature. At that time Mr. Ellis was county commissioner and superintendent of public instruction,...

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Biography of John H. Rice

John H. Rice had the distinction of having made his mark in two states of the Union of widely different tendencies–Georgia and Kansas. He was born in Greene County, Tennessee, November 14, 1825, and his father, a native of Virginia, was surveyor of the county, named for twenty-six consecutive terms. Mr. Rice commenced his higher education at Tusculum College, in his native county, of which his maternal uncle, Dr. Samuel W. Doak, was president. He was admitted to the bar in 1845 and, a few months afterward, opened an office at Cassville, Georgia. In 1855, in addition to conducting a fair legal business, he became editor of the Cassville Standard. In the following year he was elected major general of the Twelfth Division of the Georgia State Militia, as the Union candidate, and in 1857 located at Atlanta. There he founded the Franklin Printing Company, which, under his management, had become a large book publishing concern at the time of its destruction in the Civil war. Always a consistent opponent of secession, General Rice was prevented from taking part in the War of the Rebellion on account of a stroke of paralysis which he suffered in 1861. In May, 1865, he was appointed purchasing agent for the Federal cavalry forces then operating in Georgia, and served in that capacity until the forces were mustered out of the service in...

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Biography of Fred Schuyle Jackson

Fred Schuyle Jackson, of Topeka, prominent lawyer, former congressman, ex-attorney-general of Kansas, is one of the many able men who have made Kansas notable as a commonwealth. His father was Martin Van Buren Jackson, who bore a conspicuous part in the border warfare of Kansas. Fred S. Jackson was born April 19, 1868, and his birth occurred in the block house at Stanton near Osawatomie. His early education came chiefly from the public schools of Miami and Greenwood counties, and of earlier experiences and service readered should be mentioned five years spent in the schoolroom as a teacher, In the meantime he read law, and in 1891 was admitted to the bar. In order to equip himself the better for his chosen profession he then became a student in the law department of the University of Kansas, where he was graduated with high credit. In the meantime he had begun practice at Eureka, and it required only a few years for a man of his excellent ability, his knowledge of men, and his high ambition to serve, to build up a large clientage and extend his reputation as a lawyer to many remote quarters of the state. After concluding his service in the office of county attorney, his abilities attracted the attention of C. C. Coleman, then attorney-general of Kansas, who induced Mr. Jackson to become first assistant in...

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Biography of Rev. Cyrus R. Rice

Rev. Cyrus R. Rice, of Hartford, is one of the revered fathers of the Methodist Church in Kansas. He comes of a Tennessee family, and was himself born near Lebanon, that state, August 27, 1833. His father was a physician of many years’ practice in Tennessee and Missouri. The son also studied medicine, but his decided inclinations were toward the ministry, and in 1853 he united with the St. Louis Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The next year he was licensed to preach and appointed to the Thomasville Circuit, and in 1855 was sent as a missionary to Osawatomie, Kansas. In March, 1856, he returned to Patterson, Missouri, married Lucy A. McCormick, and spent most of his bridal trip on horseback with his wife, returning to Kansas. During the succeeding three years he organized various societies along the Neoshe River, at Fort Scott and Tecumseh, and in 1859 was assigned to the Shawneetown charge, where he ministered for two years. During the Civil war the Methodist Church, South, withdrew from Kansas and Mr. Rice was without regular appointment until March, 1865, when he united with the conference of the Methodist Episeopal Church and was assigned to the congregations at Centropolis and Prairie City. In 1867 he moved to Lyon County, and was the first presiding elder of the district. After four years of service in that capacity...

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Biographical Sketch of John Francis

John Francis, one of the leading pioneers and public men of Allen County and his section of the state, was born in Norfolk, England, April 24, 1837, and soon after be had attained his majority came to the struggling territory as an ardent advocate of free statehood. In the fall of 1858 he settled at Osawatomie, and during the following winter was one of John Brown’s closest followers. In March, 1859, he took up his residence on a pre-emption claim in Allen County. In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company D, Fifth Kansas Regiment, and served until November, 1863, when he was discharged for disability. Soon afterward he was elected clerk of Allen County and, by his re-election in 1864, held the office for two terms. He then served for two suecessive terms as county treasurer; performed the duties of clerk of the District Court from 1865 to 1868, and in 1869-77 was a resident of Iola. During that period he was a merchant of the place, although, by appointment and election, he acted as state treasurer in 1874-82. In 1899 and in 1901 he was chosen a member of the State House of Representatives, at the latter session being chairman of the Ways and Means Committee. Later he served on the tax commission of the state, in which capacity he added to his reputation as an able and...

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Biography of John G. Haskell

John G. Haskell, who made a reputation both as a soldier and an architect, was born in Chittenden County, Vermont, February 5, 1832, and was educated at Wesleyan Academy, Wilbraham, Massachusetts, and Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. In 1855 he entered an architect’s office in Boston, and two years later settled at Lawrence, Kansas. During the Civil war Captain Haskell served as assistant quartermaster general of Kansas, as quartermaster of the Third Kansas and the Tenth Kansas Volunteers, as captain and assistant quartermaster on the staff of Gen. James G. Blunt, and chief quartermaster of the Army of the Frontier. In 1866 he was made architect of the state house, building the east wing, and as state architect subsequently constructed much of the capitol; also the State University, Snow Hall, the insane asylums at Topeka and Osawatomie, the reform school at Topeka and the reformatory, were all designed and largely built by...

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Biography of Peter W. Goebel

When the American Bankers’ Association in their annual meeting at Kansas City, in September, 1916, gave unanimous choice to Peter W. Goebel for president of the association, they not only honored one of the ablest bankers of the country but also the State of Kansas, where Mr. Goebel’s career as a banker began and where for over thirty years his name and influence have been growing to that point where they were recognized in such distinctive manner by the bankers of the nation. The story of one of the greatest of Kansas banks and of Mr. Goebel is almost identical. The Commercial National Bank of Kansas City, Kansas, when it opened its doors for business under the name Commercial State Bank on May 1, 1897, had as its first president Peter W. Goebel. He had been president throughout the various changes and the expansion of the institution, and sharing with him in point of continuous service is also Mr. C. L. Brokaw, who had been cashier from the beginning to the present time. The Commercial State Bank had its first home at Fifth Street and Minnesota. Avenue. The original capital stock was $25,000 and the first day’s deposits were $12,000. The original directors were P. W. Goebel, A. C. Fasenmyer, J. A. Hirst, W. T. Maunder, M. Staley, H. W. Sandusky, E. S. McAnany, J. R. Chapman, E. F....

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Biography of John Holt Rice

John Holt Rice was educated at Tusculum College in his native county. At that time his uncle, Dr. Samuel W. Doak was president of the school. In February, 1845, at the age of nineteen, John H. Rice was admitted to the bar. In the following May he located at Cassville, Georgia, where he took up an active practice. In 1855 he became editor of the Cassville Standard, carrying those responsibilities in addition to his legal practice. January 1, 1856, he was elected major general of the Twelfth Division of the Georgia State Militia. That election was important because of its bearing upon the issues then most prominent before the people in Georgia and all the South. John H. Rice was Union candidate for this office, and received a majority of 1,772 votes over Col. E. M. Gault, who was the Southern Rights candidate. The following year Major Rice removed to Rome, Georgia, where he remained a short time, and then went to Atlanta, where he founded the Franklin Printing Company. Under his able management this developed as a large book publishing concern, and it continued to grow until the war came on. During the war the plant was destroyed. The achievements of John H. Rice seems the more remarkable when it is recalled that for more than forty years be lived under the shadow of sudden death. In 1861...

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Biography of Chester I. Long

Definite distinction and assured prestige have been gained by Chester I. Long as one of the representative member of the Kansas bar, and his influence in public affairs had been wide and potent, as indicated by the fact that he was elected to the United States Senate from Kansas and had been a recognized leader in the councils of the republican party in the Sunflower State. He is engaged in the practice of his profession in the City of Wichita, had honored Kansas by his character and achievement, and is eminently entitled to recognition in this history. Mr. Long was born on a farm in Perry County, Pennsylvania, on the 12th of October, 1860, and is a son of Abraham G. and Mary Long. His father was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, in 1812, and was a resident of Daviess County, Missouri, at the time of his death, in 1891, the major part of his active career having been marked by close and effective association with the industry of agriculture. His ancestors came from Germany and located in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, in the early part of the eighteenth century. He continued to reside in his native state until 1865, when he removed with his family to Daviess County, Missouri, where he developed the old homestead farm which was his residence until his death. His widow passed the closing period...

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Biography of Charles R. Jennison, Dr.

Dr. Charles R. Jennison, of Leavenworth, a brigadier general during the Civil war and afterward a leader in the public affairs of the state, was born in Jefferson County, New York, June 6, 1834. When he was twelve years old he moved with his parents to Wisconsin, and at the age of nineteen years he began to study medicine. After completing his medical course he practiced for a short time in Wisconsin and then came to Kansas, settling at Osawatomie in 1857. Within a short time he moved to Mound City, where he remained for three years, and then went to Leavenworth. Doctor Jennison was one of John Brown’s stanch supporters. Governor Robinson commissioned him captain of the Mound City Guards on February 19, 1861, and on September 4th he was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the Seventh Kansas Cavalry, which became known as “Jennison’s Jayhawkers,” being assigned to the command of the western border of Missouri with headquarters at Kansas City. He determined to clear the border of guerrillas, and his a ccess in that military undertaking was such that General Hunter appointed him acting brigadier general, and he was placed in command of “all the troops in Kansas west of and on the Neosho.” At the time of the Lawrence massacre Governor Carney called upon Jennison to raise a regiment, of which he was made colonel on October...

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Biography of Charles Sumner Newlon, M.D.

Dr. Charles Sumner Newlon, who for the past fifteen years has engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in Kansas City, Missouri, and who for many years prior to this period was a physician and surgeon of the state of Kansas, was born at Newton’s Grove, Cass county, Iowa, in 1858, a son of Dr. William Smithson and Maria (Wimp) Newlon. The ancestral line is traced back to his great-grandfather, John Newlon. The grandfather, Hiram Newlon, was born in Virginia and was a cousin of Dolly Madison, wife of the fourth president of the United States and also a relative of Mrs. Patrick Henry. The wife of Hiram Newlon was Margaret Field, of Kentucky, a cousin of Governor Shortridge, of Alabama, also of Wade Hampton and of Judge Field, of Louisiana. Dr. W. S. Newton, father of Dr. Charles S. Newlon, was also a prominent physician of the west. He collected the indigenous plants of southern Kansas for the Centennial Exposition and made many geological surveys in Kansas, Oklahoma and Missouri, contributing valuable collections to Washburn College and the Smithsonian Institute. In 1882 he investigated and wrote articles upon the screw fly. About this time he contended through the medical press that consumption and some ten or twelve other diseases were caused by germs. He discovered five or six fossil cephalopods, a crawfish and several insects new to...

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Biography of James A. Wilson

James A. Wilson.One of the richest oil land districts of Kansas is the territory lying in the vicinity of El Dorado, the county seat of Butler County. Among its citizens who have become prominent factors in oil production is James A. Wilson. All through this locality rich strikes have been made, and one of the best was on the land owned by Mr. Wilson, just 1 1/2 miles north of El Dorado. This copious pool was the third one developed and had become famous as the Derby-Wilson lease of 480 acres. Mr. Wilson had twenty-one producing oil wells on the land at present. Mr. Wilson came to Butler County in its pioneer days. He was ambitious and energetic, and long before the development of the oil fields had acquired interests that made him one of the chief cattle men and one of the largest land holders. James A. Wilson was born in Columbia County, Wisconsin, December 23, 1850, a son of Daniel and Mary J. (Wood) Wilson. He is descended from a titled family of England. His grandfather, the founder of this branch in America, was a second son. Not being in line for an inheritance from his father he sought a new field of opportunity in Canada and there spent the remaining years of his life, his death occurring in the City of Montreal. In that city in...

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Biography of David Johnson, M. D.

David Johnson, M. D., a prominent medical specialist whose home and laboratories are at Salina, returned to Kansas a few years ago after many years spent in practice in the New England states, most of the time at Boston. He returned to Kansas because many years ago, on first coming to America, he had located in this then new state, and it was those early impressions and experiences with Kansas life and people that caused him to locate here for a permanent home in his decliaing years. Doctor Johnson was born in Sweden on May 4, 1848. He was liberally educated, graduating from the noted Upsala University at Upsala in the medical course. He was twenty-one years of age when he arrived in America in May, 1869, and his first location was at Paola, Kansas, where he took out his papers to become a naturalized American. After practicing for three years at Paola, Doctor Johnson practiced one year at Kansas City, Missouri, and then removed to Worcester, Massachusetts, where he was in the active work of his profession for nine years. After that he practiced at Boston until 1909, and during all these years had been a close student and had carried on some investigations with zemarkable results as to the cause of various incurable or so-called incurable diseases. During his long residence in Boston and after much experimentation...

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Biography of Jessie K. Clarke, M. D.

In no field of endeavor requiring intellectuality has woman failed to demonstrate her equality with man, and more and more the different lines of professional labor are opening to her, and therein she is winning successes that are most creditable. Dr. Jessie K. Clarke, although a recent acquisition to the medical fraternity of Grangeville, has already demonstrated her right to be classed among the foremost physicians of Idaho County, and her ability is indicated by the liberal patronage she now enjoys. She makes a specialty of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, and her labors have been attended by most gratifying results to patient and practitioner. Dr. Clarke is a native of Ohio, her birth having occurred in Circleville, June 1, 1861. She is of English lineage on the paternal side and of Scotch descent on the maternal, her mother’s people tracing their ancestry back to Sir William Wallace, one of the greatest heroes and patriots that his land has ever produced. The Clarkes have for generations been residents of New York. To this family belongs Dr. Elisha Clarke, a grand-uncle of the lady of whom we write. Her father, William A. Clarke, was a native of Albany, New York, was a farmer by occupation, and religiously was connected with the United Brethren church. He married Miss Sarah M. Cleveland, and to them were born eight children,...

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