Location: Maysville Kentucky

The Meeting in 1811 of Tecumseh and Apushamatahah

The meeting in 1811, of Tecumseh, the mighty Shawnee, with Apushamatahah, the intrepid Choctaw. I will here give a true narrative of an incident in the life of the great and noble Choctaw chief, Apushamatahah, as related by Colonel John Pitchlynn, a white man of sterling integrity, and who acted for many years as interpreter to the Choctaws for the United States Government, and who was an eye-witness to the thrilling scene, a similar one, never before nor afterwards befell the lot of a white man to witness, except that of Sam Dale, the great scout of General Andrew...

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Through Ohio And Kentucky

Sunday, Oct. 18.–Myself and friend proceeded on our journey. We arrived at Siers, a distance of thirty miles, at dusk, much relieved by the change from our horses to the wagon. The roads were muddy, the weather drizzly and the country hilly. Buildings indifferent. The land very fertile and black. Trees uncommonly tall. Passed the little village of Cadis. In this country a tavern, a store, a smith shop and two or three cabins make a town. Passed ten or fifteen travelers. Great contrast between the quality of the land from Chambersburg to Pittsburg, and that which we have already traveled over from Steubenville in Ohio. Monday, Oct. 19.–Left Siers at 6 o’clock a. m. The morning fair and cold. Roads extremely rough. Country fertile, but hilly. Log cabins, ugly women and tall timber. Passed a little flourishing village called Freeport, settled by foreigners. Yankee Quakers and mechanics. Remarkable, with two taverns in the village, there was nothing fit to drink, not even good water. The corn fields in the woods among dead trees and the corn very fine. We arrived at Adairs, a distance of twenty-seven miles, at 6 o’clock p. m. Passed some peddlers and a few travelers. Value of land from Steubenville to Adairs from $2 to $30 per acre. Lots in Freeport, eighteen months old, from $30 to $100. This day being Monday and the...

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Biography of Abraham Snethen

Abraham Snethen and his wife, Elizabeth Stewart, were natives of Germany. They emigrated to America and settled in New Jersey, where they had eleven children, of whom the names of only seven are now remembered. They were William, John, Reuben, Polly, Lydia, Elizabeth, and Margaret. William married and settled in Kentucky in 1792, and in 1810 he removed to Ohio, where he lost his wife. He then started to return to New Jersey, but died of cholera, at Hagerstown, Md. John was born in March, 1789, and when he was eight years old his mother died. He was then bound out to a man in Elizabethtown, N. J., to learn the trade of wheel-wright. He remained with the man seven years, and then having had a misunderstanding with his landlady, he ran away and went to Philadelphia, where he embarked on board a ship as a sailor He followed the sea seven years, and during the latter part of that period, while the ship was returning from the West India Islands, with a cargo of sugar and coffee, the yellow fever broke out among the crew and all of them died except Snethen, the cook, and one sailor. They succeeded, however, in bringing the vessel safely into port, and delivering her to the owners, whose admiration of Snethen’s bravery and skill was so great that they proposed to educate...

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Biographical Sketch of Richard Perry Tolle

Tolle, Richard Perry; merchant; born, Maysville, Ky., Oct. 20, 1883; son of William A. and Sarah Frances Fowler Tolle; educated, public schools, Maysville; married, Indianapolis, Ind., May 19, 1904, Annabel Day; issue, three children; manager the S. S. Kresge Co., Cleveland store; 32nd degree Mason, A. A. 0. N. M. Shrine; member Country Club. Recreations: Baseball and...

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Biography of E. T. Currens

E. T. Currens, farmer and fruit-grower; P. O. Mattoon; was born in Bracken Co., Ky., in 1816; his father was a farmer and tanner, and for fifty-five years conducted the two interests jointly, at Germantown, Ky.; E. T.’s early life was spent upon his father’s farm and in learning the tanning business; he entered Augusta College, Ky., in 1832, and graduated there from in 1836; he then engaged in mercantile life and farming till 1854, when he moved to Iowa and established the Kentucky settlement in Marshall Co.; in 1861, he returned to Maysville, Ky., and engaged in the hardware trade, in the firm of Currens & Owens; in 1864, he came to Mattoon, where he has since resided. Mr. Currens has thrice plighted himself at the nuptial altar; his first marriage occurred in 1839, his second in 1849, and his last in 1859, each time choosing for his helpmeet one of Kentucky’s fair daughters. His life has been one of marked activity; he has been an enterprising and liberal business man, and has always taken an active and leading part in introducing and rearing fine stock, in agricultural and horticultural exhibitions; he was the first merchant to build a tobacco warehouse outside of the river towns, and to buy, price and ship the farmers’ crops of Mason and Bracken Cos.; he founded the Union Agricultural Company of these...

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Biography of Capt. John Burgess Davis

When the great West was young the Mississippi River, as the principal gateway to it and almost the sole means of conveying its products to the out-side world was the center of commercial life. Men who followed the river were participants in stirring events and their work was fraught with an importance in the eyes of the public that we of today can little realize. To be a steamboat captain in the fifties and sixties invested the individual with a dignity as great as that accorded to the average railroad magnate nowadays. Captain John Burgess Davis earned his title when the great stream was at its best, and there were few who won greater honors than he for his calling. Among his most notable achievements was the taking of the first boat up the Minnesota River to Big Stone Lake; thence into the Red River of the North, and the construction of the first wing dam on the Mississippi. The boat he took into the Red River was the “Freighter.” It was in 1859 that he navigated through Big Stone Lake into the Northern stream. The first wing dam was built some years later, in 1873, when he was in charge of a Government fleet, and it was located three miles below St. Paul, at Pig’s Eye Island. This method of improvement, which he was the first to use...

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