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Location: Marshall County MS

Slave Narrative of Lizzie Johnson

Interviewer: Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Lizzie Johnson Location: Biscoe, Arkansas Place of Birth: Holly Springs, Mississippi Age: 65 Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. LIZZIE JOHNSON 706 North Senate Avenue, Apt. 1 Mrs. Johnson’s father, Arthur Locklear, was born in Wilmington, N.C. in 1822. He lived in the South and endured many hardships until 1852. He was very fortunate in having a white man befriend him in many ways. This man taught him to read and write. Many nights after a hard days work, he would lie on the floor in front of the fireplace, trying to study by the light from the blazing wood, so he might improve his reading and writing. He married very young, and as his family increased, he became ambitious for them. Knowing their future would be very dark if they remained South. He then started a movement to come north. There were about twenty-six or twenty-eight men and women, who had the same thoughts about their children, banded together, and in 1852 they started for somewhere, North. The people selected, had to be loyal to the cause of their children’s future lives, morally clean, truthful, and hard-working. Some had oxen, some had carts. They pooled all of their scant belongings, and started on their long hard journey. The women and children rode...

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Biography of G. B. Glover

The stock men of Malheur County are the men who have brought the County to the front by their arduous labors and wise manipulation of the resources here found, and as a prominent one of this distinguished class the subject of this article is well known, being also a worthy pioneer, who wrought here with a firm hand and endured the hardships incident to that life, while his keen foresight and enterprise led him to see the value of the country that he was opening. Mr. Glover was born in Holly Springs, Mississippi on December 20, 1841, and at the age of fourteen went with his father and the balance of the family to Arkansas, where he remained until the breaking out of the terrible Civil war and then enlisted in the Confederate army, doing valiant military service until the close of the conflict. He then returned to his home, and in 1870 came to Jackson County, Missouri and thence, five years later, he journeyed to what is now Malheur County. He located where he now lives, eighteen miles northwest from Jordan valley, at Cow Creek lakes, took land and engaged in farming and stock-raising. Success has attended his thrifty and wisely bestowed labors and he now has a valuable estate of eleven hundred and forty acres of land. “The Lakes.” as the estate is called, is one of...

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Biography of Jackson Johnson

Jackson Johnson of St. Louis, who as chairman of the board of the International Shoe Company has gained not only American but world leadership in connection with shoe manufacturing interests, was born in La Grange, Alabama, on the 2d of November, 1859, a son of James Lee and Helen (Rand) Johnson, the former a native of Mississippi, while the latter was born in Alabama. The father owned and conducted a plantation up to the time of the Civil war. Jackson Johnson pursued his education in the public schools of his native state and when nineteen years of age initiated his business career by becoming identified with a general merchandise establishment at Holly Springs, Mississippi, where he conducted business until 1892. He then disposed of his store and in the following year removed to Memphis, Tennessee, where he was active in organizing the Johnson, Carruthers & Rand Company, a business concern of which he remained the president for five years. On selling out he removed to St. Louis in March, 1898, and was active in organizing the Roberts, Johnson & Rand Shoe Company, manufacturers of shoes. He became president of this organization and so continued until the 29th of December, 1911, when the Roberts, Johnson & Rand Shoe Company was merged with the Peters Shoe Company, the new organization being incorporated under the name of the International Shoe Company, of...

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Biography of William P. Norman

WILLIAM P. NORMAN. There is nothing which adds so much to the prestige of a city or town, in the estimation of the public, as a first-class livery stable. In this respect Harrison is certainly to be congratulated. Among her establishments of this kind are found men of great business tact and enterprise, and none more so than William P. Norman, who conducts one of the busiest, best-managed livery stables in the county. Mr. Norman came originally from Mississippi, his birth occurring in Marshall County in 1853, and he is a son of Jesse L. and Mary Ann (Clayton) Norman, natives of South Carolina, where they were reared and married. From there they removed to Mississippi some time in the forties and there passed the closing scenes of their lives, the father dying in 1874 and the mother in 1892. Both were Missionary Baptists for many years and were well and favorably known over the section in which they lived. He followed the occupation of a planter, and at the time of the breaking out of the Civil War was quite wealthy. Then he lost all. In politics he was a Democrat, and for a number of years he held the office of justice of the peace. His father died in South Carolina many years ago and left a large family. Grandfather Fielding Clayton was a planter, and died...

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Slave Narrative of Diana Alexander

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Diane Alexander Location: Brinkley, Arkansas Age: 74 Occupation: Worked in field, Washed, Ironed “I was born in Mississippi close to Bihalia. Our owner was Myers(?) Bogan. He had a wife and children. Mama was a field woman. Her name was Sarah Bogan and papa’s name was Hubberd Bogan. “I heard them talk about setting the pot at the doors and having singing and prayer services. They all sung and prayed around the room. I forgot all the things they talked about. My parents lived on the same place after freedom a long time. They said he was good to them. “Dr. Bogan in Forrest City, Arkansas always said I was his brother’s child. He was dead years ago, so I didn’t have no other way of knowing. “The only thing I can recollect about the War was once my mistress took me and her own little girl upstairs in a kind of ceiling room (attic). They had their ham meat and jewelry locked up in there and other fine stuff. She told us to sit down and not move, not even grunt. Me and Fannie had to be locked up so long. It was dark. We both went to sleep but we was afraid to stir. The Yankees come then but I didn’t get to see them. I didn’t want to be took...

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Slave Narrative of Alice Biggs

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Alice Biggs Age: “Bout 70” Location: Holly Grove, Arkansas “My mother come from Kentucky and my father from Virginia. That where they born and I born close to Byhalia, Mississippi. My father was Louis Anthony and mama name Charlotte Anthony. “Grandma and her children was sold in a lump. They wasn’t separated. Grandpa was a waiter on the Confederate side. He never come back. He died in Pennsylvania; another man come back reported that. He was a colored waitin’ man too. Grandma been dead 49 years now. “Mama was a wash woman and a cook. They liked her. I don’t remember my father; he went off with Anthony. They lived close to Nashville, Tennessee. He never come back. Mama lived at Nashville a while. The master they had at the closin’ of the war was good to grandma and mama. It was Barnie Hardy and Old Kiss, all I ever heard her called. They stayed on a while. They liked us. He’d run us off if he’d had any bother. “The Ku Klux never come bout Barnie Hardy’s place. He told em at town not to bother his place. “I never wanted to vote. I don’t know how. I am too old to try tricks new as that now. “Honey, I been working in the field all my life. I’m what you call...

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Biography of Thomas D. Nichols, M. D.

Among the leading physicians of Riverside, mention should be made of the subject of this sketch. Dr. Nichols was born in Marshall County, Mississippi, in 1840. His parents were Asa and Priscilla O. (Duty) Nichols, both descendants of Southern California. His father was a planter by occupation, and gave his son the advantages of a good education. In 1859, Dr. Nichols entered upon a college course in the Florence Wesleyan University. The secession movement and the establishment of the Southern Confederacy, aroused his patriotism, and his love for the South and her institutions induced him to abandon his studies, and in the winter of 1860-’61, he entered the military service of his State, and upon the commencement of the civil war promptly enlisted in the Confederate Army; from that time until the surrender of Johnston’s army at Greensboro, North Carolina, in 1865, Dr. Nichols never faltered in his loyalty to his Southern home and country. Upon his entry in the army, he was assigned to duty with the medical department as field hospital steward, and participated in the memorable campaigns and battles of the Southern armies under Generals A. S. Johnston, Bragg, Beauregard and Joseph E. Johnston. During his five years of service he applied himself to the study of medicine, and at the same time was in attendance in the field hospitals and had charge of patients suffering...

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Biography of Captain Nelson Green Gill

Captain Nelson Green Gill, Post-master of San Bernardino, came to California from Toulon, Illinois, in March 1849, with a team composed of four oxen and two cows. He came by way of St. Joseph, Fort Laramie, Fort Hall and Lassen’s cut-off, with a train composed of twenty-two wagons. They brought with them a ferryboat, which they used in crossing the North Platte and Green rivers, afterward selling it for $100. They arrived in Sacramento valley, September 26, 1849. Leaving his ox teams at Bidwell’s ranch, Captain Gill started for the mines on Feather River. After he had been in the mines a few months, provisions ran short, and he and a fellow miner started with their oxen and wagon for Sacramento to lay in a supply. The Sacramento River was swollen to a flood, and, becoming involved in the flood, they lost their wagon and oxen, and Mr. Gill’s companion lost his life. Three months elapsed before Mr. Gill got back to camp; he had lost everything he started with, including $600 in gold. Not being successful at mining and being troubled with scurvy, as were many others, he, accompanied by a mining companion, started for Los Angeles, walking to Marysville on foot. They took a rowboat to Sacramento, thence, by steamer, to San Francisco; then, not having money enough to buy two tickets, they walked all the way,...

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