Select Page

Location: Madison County VA

Genealogy of Willis Austin

The sixth child of Henry and Nancy Ann Austin was living in Madison County, Virginia by 1824. There he met Jane Malone and married her. Willis’ occupation to support her and the family was that of a carpenter and farmer. By 1850 the family had grown to nine members. They lived in Worf Town in 1850. They either remained in Virginia or moved to Missouri. 506 Willis Austin born circa 1796 Albemarle Co., Va. married 23 Aug 1823 Jane Malone born circa 1805 Virginia died 30 Sept. 1877 Mo. Children of Willis Austin and Jane Malone: 601 John H. Austin born circa 1824 Madison Co., Va. married Louisa Broyles born 6 Feb. 1837 Madison Co., Va. died 1862/3 Henry Co., Mo. 602 James N. Austin born circa 1827 603 Mary A. Austin born circa 1829 604 Elizabeth Austin born circa 1832 605 Catherine Austin born circa 1833 606 Nathan Franklin Austin born circa 1834’s married Sarah died 8 Nov. 18?5 Shelby Co., Ill. 607 Martha Austin born circa 1837 Sources for the Genealogy of Willis Austin: 1820 Census Albemarle Co., Va. 1850 Census Madison Co., Va. Janet Austin Curtis Records Va. Genealogist Vol. 16, 2, p. 9...

Read More

Genealogy of John H. Austin

The first born son of Willis and Jane Austin lived for a time in Madison Co., Virginia. He worked as a wheelwright. Around 1854/55 he married Louisa J. Broyles, daughter of Garriott and Eunice Broyles. Later the Austin family moved to Missouri along with the Broyles family to Henry County, Missouri. There in 1857 John H. Austin bought one half acre for $38.00. His cabin was used for a post office until 1860. John H. Austin died 1862/3 but his widow Louisa continued the post office until 1864. After 1883-4 Louisa Austin and some of her children moved to Shelby County, Illinois. Her son Henry had already come to Shelby County and was living with John and Cordelia Broyles Harmon in 1880. Cordelia Harmon was Louisa Austin’s sister. Cordelia died sometime before Louisa came to Shelby County. Louisa Austin married her sister’s widower John Harmon in 1884. Louisa J. Broyles Austin Harmon lived until 11 June 1912. Her obituary appeared in the 20 June 1912 Shelby Democrat. Surviving were her husband John Harmon, sons: ‘William Austin of California; Belfield and Henry Austin of Shelby Co., Ill.; Thomas Austin of Missouri; daughter Ida Bowman of Lakewood, Ill. Stepchildren: Estella Duckett and M. M. Harmon of Lakewood, Ill. She was buried in Harmon Cemetery. 601 John H. Austin born circa 1824 Madison Co., Va. married circa 1854/5 Louisa J. Broyles born...

Read More

Genealogy of Belfield Kirtley Austin

Belfield Austin, son of John H. Austin and Louisa J. Broyles, continued living in Henry County, Missouri where on 28 October 1883 he married Gertrude Wilma Rhodus. While in Missouri they had five children: two of which died by 1890 of cholera. During the summer of 1898 the family moved to Shelby County, Illinois where Henry, Belfield’s brother, was already living with his wife near Lakewood, Illinois. In November of that same year, Belfield and Gertrude had another son Herbert. Unfortunately on 29 Feb. 1899, “Mrs. Belfield Austin died at her home northeast of town (Lakewood)… and the remains were interred in the Harmon Cemetery Sunday. She leaves a husband and four children.” Belfield was left with children to care for, the youngest being a small baby. On November 6, 1899 C. A. Kellar assumed guardianship of the baby Herbert and moved to Colorado: Belfield K. Austin remained at his home near Lakewood until his death in 1943. His estate was administered by his son Gilbert. A public sale was held in May/June 1944 to sell two tracts of land and 1 tract of oil and mineral rights to satisfy the state of Illinois claims against the estate. The land was a five acre tract near Lakewood and five lots in Cowden. Belfield’s obituary read: ”Hatfield K. Austin, son of John and Louisa Austin, was born near Madison, Virginia, August...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Benjamin Gammon

Benjamin Gammon, of Madison County, Va., married Sarah Maddox, and settled in (now) Montgomery County, Mo., in 1812. They had John, Henry, Anderson, Stephen, Jonathan, Benjamin, Jr., Harris, Elizabeth, Julia, and Sarah. John, Anderson, and Benjamin all died unmarried. Jonathan married Martha Dickerson, and lives on Hancock’s Prairie, in Montgomery County. Sarah married Alfonzo Price. The other children married and settled in different States. Mr. Gammon, Sr., built a hand-mill on his farm, which was the first in that part of the country, and it supplied his own family and his neighbors with meal for some time. The meal for his own family was generally ground just before it was required for use, and he allowed two ears of corn for each individual; but one day Jacob Groom took dinner with them, and they had to grind three ears for him, as he was very fond of corn bread. The grinding was done by the children, and it was said that Mr. Gammon “broke all his children at the...

Read More

Biography of George R. Wendling, Jr.

George R. Wendling, Jr., of the Myers-Wendling Insurance Company of St. Louis, was born March 9, 1894, in Bloomington, Illinois. His father, George R. Wendling, was also a native of Illinois, his birth having occurred in Shelby county. He became a prominent attorney of that state and was a member of a constitutional convention of 1870 which framed the organic law of the commonwealth and had the distinction of being the youngest representative in that body, as he was only twenty-five years of age when elected. He won wide popularity as a lecturer as well as distinction in law practice. For several years he was associated in his professional activity with Judge Anthony Thornton, at one time chief justice of the state of Illinois. In politics Mr. Wendling was a lifelong democrat and exerted considerable influence over political affairs in state and nation, yet never sought nor desired public office. In early manhood he married Josephine Stephenson, a daughter of James Stephenson, who was born in Virginia. In tha family of Mr. and Mrs. George R. Wendling, Sr., were two daughters: Mrs. O. W. Catching, of Vicksburg, Mississippi, her husband being a prominent attorney there, and Mrs. William S. Conant, whose husband is a consulting engineer of Detroit, Michigan. The son of the family, George R. Wendling, Jr., was educated in the public schools of Washington, D. C., and...

Read More

Biography of Jones, Henry

Henry Jones, one of the “Old Three Hundred” of Austin’s colony was born in Madison County, Virginia, near the “Blue Ridge,” in 1798. In 1817, when but nineteen years of age, he left home in company with his brother, John, and went on a trip of adventure. They came down the Mississippi in a. flat boat to New Orleans, and there laid in supplies and ammunition and returned to the mouth of White River and was here joined by Martin Varner, Creason and two other young men of like temperament as themselves. They now laid their plans -to explore strange countries and became trappers and hunters and commenced at this place, trapping for fur animals, and killing deer, bear and other game for their pelts. In this way they remained two years, traveling over parts of Arkansas, Indians Territory and other places, part of the time being in camp on the Washita River, trading with friendly Indians. During all of these rambles, and having a good time generally, they had not met or been molested by hostile Indians. Finally, however, while in camp on a tributary of the Washita, they discovered signs of hostile Indians. They detected that these Indians were not friendly by seeing where they had killed deer and other game, but could never get sight of them; while, on the other hand, if they had been...

Read More

Search


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest