Location: Madison County MT

Madison County, Montana 1870-1888

Madison County, rendered forever famous as the district of country containing the Alder gulch of worldwide renown, 4,900 square miles in extent, had also a population of not more than 4,000 at the last census. It is a county rich in resources, chiefly mineral, although agricultural to a considerable degree. Its chief export was gold, while silver, copper, lead, iron, marble, coal, and other valuable minerals abound. The county owned in 1884 cattle, horses, and sheep valued at $1,800,000, and had 10 sawmills cutting 1,000,000 feet of lumber yearly, 2 grist-mills making 6,000 sacks of flour annually, besides raising 100,000 bushels of grain, 50,000 bushels of root crops and pease, and selling 5,000 beef cattle. Virginia City, once the capital of Montana, and the county seat of Madison County, had in 1880 a population of about 1,000, and more business than that would seem to indicate. Virginia had telegraphic communication with Salt Lake and the east in 1866. John Creighton was superintendent of the line. It was extended to Helena in 1867. In 1878 the leading bank bought $400,000 worth of gold bars and dust, received deposits which averaged $100,000 in bank constantly, and sold $1,400,000 in exchange. The public buildings at Virginia are handsome and costly. The public school building cost $12,000, the Masonic Temple $30,000, the courthouse $35,000, and others in proportion. There were three churches, Catholic,...

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1863 Settlers to Madison County, Montana

John Willhard, born in Germany Sept. 28, 1838, came to the U. S. in 1854, and crossed the plains with a mule-team in 1860, to Colorado, where he mined and farmed until May 1863, when he followed the immigration to Montana. After mining one season at Virginia City he took a farm of 640 acres in the Beaverhead Valley, a mile below Twin Bridges. In company with Lester Harding he discovered Carpenter’s Bar. Carl Rahmig, born in Germany Oct. 3, 1837, came to the U. S. in 1858, locating in Iowa, where he remained until 1862, when he went to Nevada with a horse-team. After a short stay there and in Cal. he went to Idaho, and thence to Montana. His first residence was in the Prickly Pear Valley, after prospecting and mining until 1870 he settled on a farm in the valley of Willow Creek, between the Madison and Beaverhead Rivers, and raised stock. O. W. Jay, born in New York May 2, 1844, removed with his parents to Wisconsin and Illinois, being raised a farmer. At the age of 17 years went to Colorado, returning the same season to Illinois. In. 1863 went again to Colorado, and the same year to Virginia City, where he mined until 1870, when he secured a farm of 1,100 acres. He married Ella J. Wilcox in 1874. Wilson Butt, Fish Creek,...

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Biography of Thomas C. Fletcher

One of the earliest pioneers of this region of the country, a man whose life has always been dominated by wisdom prudence and upright principles,. having ever manifested also stanch virtues and a reliability that are becoming a good citizen and faithful man, the subject of this article is vie of the leading men of Malheur County, and a prominent resident of Ontario. Thomas C. was born in Mercer County, Kentucky, on October 11, 1841, being the son of Jewett and Elizabeth Fletcher. When our subject was six years of age he had the misfortune to lose his father and he was soon thereafter taken by his mother to Lee County, Iowa, near Ft. Madison where he was reared on a farm attend the Common schools for his education. In the fall of 1861 when the stirring call came for men to defend the nation’s honor and save her from the assault of treason’s bards, he promptly enlisted in Company G Fourth Iowa Calvalry as bugler and was under General Curtis. Several skirmishes were participated in Missouri and then he was transferred to Sherman’s army Sixteenth Corps, being immediately under% 9A. J. Smith. He was in siege of Vicksburg and on account of sickness was sent home on a furlough, but after recovering was seen again in the ranks and took part in the battle of Ripley, Meridian, and...

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Biography of George L. Shoup

It is a well-attested maxim that the greatness of a state lies not in its machinery of government, nor even in its institutions, but in the sterling qualities of its individual citizens, in their capacity for high and unselfish effort and their devotion to the public good. Rising above the heads of the mass there has always been a series of individuals, distinguished beyond others, who by reason of their pronounced ability and forceful personality have always commanded the respect of their fellow men and who have revealed to the world those two resplendent virtues of a lordly race, perseverance in purpose and a directing spirit which never fails. Of this class George L. Shoup stands as an excellent illustration. The goal toward which he has hastened during the many years of his toil and endeavor is that which is attained only by such as have by patriotism and wise counsel given the world an impetus toward the good; such have gained the right and title to have their names enduringly inscribed on the bright pages of history. George L. Shoup has been a resident of Idaho since 1866, has served as chief executive of the state, and is now representing the commonwealth in the United States senate. He was born in Kittanning, Pennsylvania, June 15, 1836 and traces his descent to German ancestors, who located in the colony...

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Biography of Hon. Ruel Rounds

Ex-Senator Ruel Rounds, postmaster and prominent citizen of Idaho Falls, was born in Rutland, Vermont, September 3, 1841, a son of William M. and Maria (Sanderson) Rounds, both natives of Vermont, where his ancestors were early settlers. Forefathers of his in both lines fought for American liberty in the Revolutionary war. His parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal church and wielded an influence for good upon all who knew them. His father, who was a successful farmer, died in his fifty-eighth year. His mother died ten years younger. Of their eight children, five are living and Ruel was the first born. After having gained requisite primary education in the district schools near his home, Ruel Rounds entered Windsor College, from which institution he was “graduated” into the United States Army in May 1861, without waiting to finish his classical course. He became a member of Company K, First Regiment Vermont Volunteer Infantry, and on the l0th of June, the next month after his enlistment, received his “baptism of fire,” in the battle of. Big Bethel. His term of service expired in 1862, and he reenlisted in Company K, Twelfth Regiment, Vermont Volunteer Infantry, which was included in the Army of the Potomac. He was in numerous engagements, among them those of Falmouth, Fredericksburg and Gettysburg; where he participated in heavy and prolonged fighting. At the end of his...

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Biography of Charles W. Berryman

Charles W. Berryman, a prominent citizen of Blackfoot, Idaho, a member of the well known firm of Berryman & Rogers, stock-raisers and dealers and loaners of money and dealers in county and city bonds, is a native of Wisconsin, having been born at Hazel Green, October 10, 1843, of English ancestry. His parents, Richard and Martha (Williams) Berryman, were born in Cromwell, England. They came to the United States and in 1840 located in Grant County, Wisconsin. There Mr. Berryman became a farmer and lead-miner. He died at the age of seventy-three, in 1877, his wife having passed away many years earlier, in her forty-seventh year. They were devout and active members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in whose interests Mrs. Berryman was a tireless worker, while Mr. Berryman performed the varied functions of trustee, class-leader and Sunday-school superintendent. They had eight children, of whom six are living. Until he was nineteen years old, Charles W. Berryman remained at home, attending school and devoting himself to the work of the farm. In 1862 he joined a large band of western-bound emigrants and went overland to Oregon. Indians were numerous and aggressive in those days, and the emigrants, a large party, consolidated their one hundred and sixty wagons and many horses in one big caravan and banded together for mutual protection. There were so many of them and they were...

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M’callum, Phillip A. – Obituary

Phillip A. M’Callum, Well Known Baker Business Man Dies Abstractor Succumbs to Heart Trouble at 11:50 P.M. Long Active in Civic Work Here Widow, Two daughters, Son Survive; Funeral Friday  Phillip A McCallum, well-known Baker resident, died unexpectedly at his home, 2710 First Street, Tuesday night a t 11:50 apparently from the effects of heart trouble. Mr. McCallum apparently had not been ill and worked for a time at his office last night. He retired before other members of his family and was found dead in bed. Mr. McCallum was prominent in civic and business circles in Baker after coming here in 1918. Immediately after arriving in Baker, Mr. McCallum became associated with William Bowers in the Bowers Abstract and Title Company. He assumed the position of secretary manager of the Baker Abstract and Title Company in 1929 following the merger of the two title concerns. Mr. McCallum was vice president of the Oregon Title association at the time of his death. Mr. McCallum was secretary of the Baker Kiwanis club from the time it was organized about 12 years ago and was a charter member of the club. He was also a member of the Baker County Chamber of Commerce. Mr. McCallum became a member of the Baker Masonic lodge in February 1920. Born in Virginia City, Montana March 10, 1883, Mr. McCallum left there with his parents...

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Simmons, Halroyd G. – Obituary

Halroyd G. Simmons, 88, died on Sunday, August 8, 2004 on Vashon Island, Washington. He was born in American Fork, Utah in 1916, and moved to Cameron, Montana in 1935 with his parents and two siblings. He attended Montana State college, graduating with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. Hal and Helen Althouse were married in Bozeman in 1940. He served in the Navy during WWII and worked as an engineer until his retirement to a ranch in Richland, in 1979. While working as a plant engineer for the Asarco copper smelter in Hayden, Arizona, Hal was elected Mayor and during his tenure, Hayden was selected as an All-American city. In Hayden, Helen and Hal worked to improve educational and social access for the local Hispanic population. Hal loved the outdoors and lived an adventurous life filled with river running and camping trips. He loved Boy Scouting and was honored after decades of scouting service with the Silver Beaver Award. Hal had talents in many areas, including ceramics, wood and metal working and painting; he also played a passable harmonica and guitar. He is survived by his sister, Ann Rankin, his wife Helen, their four children, David, Halli, Evan and Ann, and numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held at the cemetery in Ennis, Montana in early October. Hal’s wife Helen may be contacted at 10421 S.W....

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Biography of Frank Petchner

Frank Petchner is one of Riverside’s pioneer settlers. He arrived in Riverside in December 1870 and has ever since been identified with her interests and enterprises. Mr. Petchner had spent many years in frontier life in the Territories, and had been engaged in mercantile and mining enterprises, and had made and lost fortunes; but when he located at Riverside he was without means, and dependent for the support of his family upon such labor as could be obtained. He was a blacksmith and opened a blacksmith shop on the corner of Sixth and Main streets; he also bought a block of land bounded by Sixth and Seventh and Almond and Chestnut streets; and later purchased other lots on Market Street. The first brick residence in the city was built by Mr. Petchner in 1875, on his block of land. The first year or two he worked at any labor that offered, as there was not a demand sufficient to occupy his time at his trade. He also improved his land by the planting of citrus and deciduous fruit trees. In 1874 he entered into partnership with Samuel Alder, and established a carriage-making and blacksmith shop on Main Street. This enterprise was a success, and, under the able management of these gentlemen, became one of the leading industries of the colony. Mr. Petchner was engaged in that business until 1884,...

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Madison County, Montana Census Records

  1870 Madison County, Montana Census Free 1870 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1870 Madison County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1870 U.S. Census Guide Hosted at USGenWeb Census Project) Index A-J Index K-Z Virginia City Virginia City Virginia City Virginia City Virginia City 1880 Madison County, Montana Census Free 1880 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1880 Madison County, Census (images and index) 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1880 U.S. Census Guide Hosted at MTGenWeb Archives 1880 Montana Census A B C D E F G H I-J K L M N O P Q-R S T U-V W X-Y-Z 1890 Madison County, Montana Census Free 1890 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1890 Veterans Schedule $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1890 U.S. Census Guide 1900 Madison County, Montana Census Free 1900 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1900 Madison County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1900 U.S. Census Guide 1910 Madison County, Montana Census Free 1910 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1910 Madison County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1910...

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Biographical Sketch of Henry Rust

HENRY RUST. – This gentleman, who has a great reputation for energy, was born in Germany in 1835. He came to America in 1860, and almost immediately entered the Union army. He fought as a private in the battle of Bull Run, and was in the subsequent campaigns before Richmond, and in the severe experiences of the peninsula. Being severely wounded in 1862, he took a long furlough, yet re-entered the service and became a captain in the commissary department. After the war he went to Virginia City, Montana, mining, and in 1867 came to Clarksville, Baker county, Oregon, and established the first brewery. After two years of this business, he took a tour for his health to South America, and upon his return took up a more stable life, marrying, and also erecting the Pacific Brewery at Baker City in 1870. This was early times for that place; and there were then but some eight hundred inhabitants, and but one substantial building in that city. Since coming there Mr. Rust has occupied a prominent position on the city council, having been president of the board in 1884. He is a Republican in politics, and a prominent member of the Grand Army of the Republic. Among his efforts calculated to benefit the county is his artesian well sunk through gravel, clay, sand and sandstone at a cost of some...

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Biographical Sketch of John W. Thompson

It is always a pleasure to outline the career of an honest, upright and progressive man, who has left the more thickly settled portions of the country, pressing out into the regions of wildness to bring them under the sway of civilization’s uplifting influences, spending, meanwhile, sturdy effort and drawing upon an exhaustless store of courage and determination to accomplish this worthy end and so we turn with zest to chronicle the events in the life of the capable and worthy citizen, whose name initiates this paragraph, since he has displayed qualities that are priceless, and manifested virtues and abilities that commend the admiration of all, while his straightforwardness and substantial and well rounded character have invited confidence that is not misplaced. John W. Thompson was born in Vermilion County, Indiana, on February 18, 1837, being the son of John E. and Elizabeth (Meyers) Thompson, natives respectively of Virginia and Maryland. Before coming to Vermilion County, the father had been occupied as a mechanic at Harper’s Ferry. When the immediate subject of this sketch was one year of age, the parents removed to Scott county, Iowa, being the third family that settled there. The father bought land from the government and set to work to make a home from the wild prairies. He was favored with success and was numbered with the prominent men of the county, and there he...

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