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Location: Macon County GA

Biography of Dr. Nathaniel Polhill Jelks

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Dr. Nathaniel Polhill Jelks, fourth son of James Oliver Jelks and Mary Polhill, was born July 18, 1845, in Hawkinsville, Pulaski County, Georgia, where he died March 28, 1911. When six years old his family moved to Oglethorpe, Georgia, after two years moving to Hamilton County, Florida, where he received his early education, later studying in Augusta, Georgia. In 1863 he entered the Confederate Army, enlisting in Company I, Second Florida Cavalry, under General Jones, a gallant command guarding the interior of the State. He was wounded at the Battle of Natural Bridge, Florida, March 6, 1865, in which the enemy was defeated. After the Confederates laid down their arms, he surrendered with his command at Baldwin, Fla. When peace came again to the land, he entered upon the study of medicine, and was graduated at Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York, in 1868. He immediately began the practice of medicine in Hawkinsville, Ga. In this profession he gained distinction and success, was a member of the Georgia Medical Association, and at one time president of the South Georgia Medical Association. As a physician he was devoted to his profession, and no one ever lived up to its high code of ethics more closely than he, not swerving from them in the remotest degree. In addition to...

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Slave Narrative of Rev. W. B. Allen

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: J. R. Jones Person Interviewed: Rev. W. B. Allen Interviewed: June 29, 1937 Location: Columbus, Georgia Residence: 425-Second Ave, Columbus, Georgia [JUL 28 1937] [TR: Original index refers to “Allen, Rev. W.B. (Uncle Wash)”; however, this informant is different from the previous informant, Washington Allen, interviewed on Dec. 18, 1936. The previous interview for Rev. Allen that is mentioned below is not found in this volume.] In a second interview, the submission of which was voluntarily sought by himself, this very interesting specimen of a rapidly vanishing type expressed a desire to amend his previous interview (of May 10, 1937) to incorporate the following facts: “For a number of years before freedom, my father bought his time from his master and traveled about over Russell County (Alabama) as a journeyman blacksmith, doing work for various planters and making good money—as money went in those days—on the side. At the close of the war, however, though he had a trunk full of Confederate money, all of his good money was gone. Father could neither read nor write, but had a good head for figures and was very pious. His life had a wonderful influence upon me, though I was originally worldly—that is, I drank and cussed, but haven’t touched a drop of spirits in forty years...

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Yuchi Indians

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Yuchi Tribe. Significance unknown, but perhaps, as suggested by Speck (1909), from a native word meaning “those far away,” or “at a distance,” though it is also possible that it is a variant of Ochesee or Oeese, which was applied by the Hitchiti and their allies to Indians speaking languages different from their own. Also called: Ani’-Yu’tsl, Cherokee name. Chiska, probably a Muskogee translation of the name of one of their bands. Hughchee, an early synonym. Round town people, a name given by the early English colonists. Rickohockans, signifying “cavelanders” (Hewitt, in Hodge, 1907), perhaps an early name for a part of them. Tahogalewi, abbreviated to Hogologe, name given them by the Delaware and other Algonquian people. Tamahita, so called by some Indians, perhaps some of the eastern Siouans. Tsoyaha, “People of the sun,” their own name, or at least the name of one band. Westo, perhaps a name applied to them by the Cusabo Indians of South Carolina though the identification is not beyond question. Yuchi Connections. The Yuchi constituted a linguistic stock, the Uchean, distinct from all others, though structurally their speech bears a certain resemblance to the languages of the Muskhogean and Siouan families. Yuchi Location. The earliest known location of the Yuchi was in eastern Tennessee, perhaps near Manchester, but some of...

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Muskogee Indians

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Muskogee. Meaning unknown, but perhaps originally from Shawnee and having reference to swampy ground. To this tribe the name Creeks was ordinarily applied. Also called: Ani’-Gu’sa, by the Cherokee, meaning “Coosa people,” after an ancient and famous town on Coosa River. Ku-û’sha, by the Wyandot. Ochesee, by the Hitchiti. Sko’-ki han-ya, by the Biloxi. Muskogee Connections. The Muskogee language constitutes one division of the Muskhogean tongues proper, that which I call Northern. Muskogee Location. From the earliest times of which we have any record these people seem to have had towns all the way from the Atlantic coast of Georgia and the neighborhood of Savannah River to central Alabama. (See also Florida, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas.) Muskogee Villages It is difficult to separate major divisions of the Muskogee from towns and towns from villages, but there were certainly several distinct Muskogee tribes at a very early period. The following subdivisional classification is perhaps as good as any: Abihka (in St. Clair, Calhoun, and Talladega Counties): Abihka-in-the-west, a late branch of Abihka in the western part of the Creek Nation, Okla. Abihkutci, on Tallassee Hatchee Creek, Talladega County, on the right bank 5 miles from Coosa River. Kan-tcati, on or near Chocolocko, or Choccolocco, Creek and probably not far from the present “Conchardee.” Kayomalgi, possibly settled...

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