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Location: Macon County AL

Biography of Clement Richardson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Clement Richardson, of Jefferson City, president of the Lincoln Institute, deserves mention as an eminent educator, for his professional work has been not merely instilling knowledge into the minds of pupils but has been broad in its scope, thoughtful in its purposes and human in its tendency. lie has studied the individual and his requirement, has met the needs of the school and has made valuable contributions to literature that has to do with his profession. Mr. Richardson was born June 23. 1878, in Halifax county, Virginia, a son of Leonard and Louise (Barksdale) Richardson. In his youthful days he attended the White Oak Grove country school, but his opportunity to pursue his studies was limited to a brief period each year, as it was necessary that he work in the tobacco fields. He was still quite a young lad when obliged to leave school in Virginia, and later he became mail carrier for the Brow Hill plantation near Paces station. In 1895, however, prompted thereto by a laudable ambition, he made his way to Massachusetts seeking work and with a view to promoting his education. After spending some years in Winchester, Massachusetts, working in a tannery, a glue factory and on a farm, through the help of the Young Men’s Christian Association and the First...

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Slave Narrative of Priscilla Mitchell

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Priscilla Mitchell Location: Dade County, Florida Priscilla Mitchell, 1614 NW 5th Ave., was born in Macon County, Alabama, March 17, 1858. “Y’ see, ah wuz oney 7 years old when ah wuz ‘mancipated. I can ‘member pickin’ cotton, but I didn’t work so hard, ah wuz too young. “I wuz my Massy’s pet. No, no he wouldn’t beat me. Whenever ah’s bad or did little things that my mother didn’t want me to do and she’d go to whip me, all I needed to do was to run to my Massy and he’d take me up and not let my mother git me.” This is a sample of the attitude that very many have toward their...

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Tuskegee Indians

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Tuskegee Tribe: Meaning unknown, but apparently containing the Alabama term taska, “warrior.” Tuskegee Connections. The original Tuskegee language is unknown but it was probably affiliated with the Alabama, and hence with the southern branch of Muskhogean. Tuskegee Location. The later and best known location of this tribe was on the point of land between Coosa and Tallapoosa Rivers, but in 1685 part of them were on the Chattahoochee River near modern Columbus and the rest were on the upper Tennessee near Long Island. (See also Oklahoma and Tennessee) Tuskegee Villages. None are known under any except the tribal name of Tuskegee. Tuskegee History. In 1540 De Soto passed through a town called Tasqui 2 days before he entered Coosa. In 1567 Vandera was informed that there were two places in this neighborhood near together called Tasqui and Tasquiqui, both of which probably belonged to the Tuskegee. By the close of the seventeenth century the Tuskegee appear to have divided into two bands one of which Coxe (1705) places on an island in Tennessee River. This band continued to live on or near the Tennessee for a considerable period but in course of time settled among the Cherokee on the south side of Little Tennessee River, just above the mouth of Tellico, in the present Monroe County,...

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Muskogee Indians

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Muskogee. Meaning unknown, but perhaps originally from Shawnee and having reference to swampy ground. To this tribe the name Creeks was ordinarily applied. Also called: Ani’-Gu’sa, by the Cherokee, meaning “Coosa people,” after an ancient and famous town on Coosa River. Ku-û’sha, by the Wyandot. Ochesee, by the Hitchiti. Sko’-ki han-ya, by the Biloxi. Muskogee Connections. The Muskogee language constitutes one division of the Muskhogean tongues proper, that which I call Northern. Muskogee Location. From the earliest times of which we have any record these people seem to have had towns all the way from the Atlantic coast of Georgia and the neighborhood of Savannah River to central Alabama. (See also Florida, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas.) Muskogee Villages It is difficult to separate major divisions of the Muskogee from towns and towns from villages, but there were certainly several distinct Muskogee tribes at a very early period. The following subdivisional classification is perhaps as good as any: Abihka (in St. Clair, Calhoun, and Talladega Counties): Abihka-in-the-west, a late branch of Abihka in the western part of the Creek Nation, Okla. Abihkutci, on Tallassee Hatchee Creek, Talladega County, on the right bank 5 miles from Coosa River. Kan-tcati, on or near Chocolocko, or Choccolocco, Creek and probably not far from the present “Conchardee.” Kayomalgi, possibly settled...

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Macon County, Alabama Census Records

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now   1840 Macon County, Alabama Census Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1840 Macon County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Macon County, Alabama Census Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1850 Macon County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Macon County, Alabama USGenWeb Archives Project Macon County, Alabama: 1850 Census Index 1850 Federal Census Macon County, Alabama (Partial) 1850 Federal Census Macon County, Alabama (Page 1 Of 7) 1850 Federal Census Macon County, Alabama (Page 2 Of 7) 1850 Federal Census Macon County, Alabama (Page 3 Of 7) 1850 Federal Census Macon County, Alabama (Page 4 Of 7) 1850 Federal Census Macon County, Alabama (Page 5 Of 7) 1850 Federal Census Macon County, Alabama (Page 6 Of 7) 1850 Federal Census Macon County, Alabama (Page 7 Of 7) Hosted at Census Guide 1850 U.S. Census Guide 1860 Macon County, Alabama Census Free 1860 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial  1860 Macon County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1860 U.S. Census Guide 1870 Macon County, Alabama...

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Macon County, Alabama Cemetery Records

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Hosted at Macon County, USGenWeb Archives Project Antioch United Methodist Church Cemetery, Macon, Alabama Damascus Cemetery Hardaway Cemetery Hickory Hill Cemetery Wesley AME Church Cemetery...

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