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Location: Lynchburg Virginia

Biographical Sketch of James Nowlin

James Nowlin and his wife, Martha Collins, were natives of Scotland. They came to America prior to the revolution, and brought all their household and kitchen furniture with them. They settled first in the eastern part of Virginia, but afterward removed to Pittsylvania County. Their only son, Bryan W. Nowlin, was a Captain in the American army during the revolution. He married Lucy Waide, of Virginia, and they had fifteen children, thirteen of whom lived to be grown, and twelve of them married. The eldest son, Peyton, married Lucy Townsend, and settled first in Kentucky, from whence he removed to Saline County, Mo., previous to 1820, and raised a large family of children. Richard Nowlin, brother of Peyton, married Celie Shelton, and settled first in Kentucky, and afterward in Saline County, Missouri. Samuel Nowlin married Fannie Paul, of Virginia, by whom he had Joseph and David. His first wife died, and he was married the second time to Elizabeth Everson, by whom he had two daughters, both of whom are living in Virginia. Joseph Nowlin lived and died in Lynchburg, Va. David studied law at the University of Virginia. In 1835 he married Elizabeth Berger, of Virginia, and the following year he came to Missouri and settled in Montgomery County, where he practiced his profession, and was elected to several official positions in the County, which he filled with...

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Slave Narrative of H. H. Edmunds

Interviewer: Albert Strope Person Interviewed: Rev. H. H. Edmunds Location: Elkhart, Indiana Place of Birth: Lynchburg, Virginia Date of Birth: 1859 Place of Residence: 403 West Hickory Street Elkhart, Indiana Albert Strope, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project St. Joseph County-District #1 Mishawaka, Indiana EX-SLAVE REV. H.H. EDMUNDS 403 West Hickory Street Elkhart, Indiana Rev. H.H. Edmunds has resided at 403 West Hickory Street in Elkhart for the past ten years. Born in Lynchburg, Virginia, in 1859, he lived there for several years. Later he was taken to Mississippi by his master, and finally to Nashville, Tennessee, where he lived until his removal to Elkhart. Mr. Edmunds is very religious, and for many years has served his people as a minister of the Gospel. He feels deeply that the religion of today has greatly changed from the “old time religion.” In slavery days, the colored people were so subjugated and uneducated that he claims they were especially susceptible to religion, and poured out their religious feelings in the so-called negro spirituals. Mr. Edmunds is convinced that the superstitions of the colored people and their belief in ghosts and gobblins is due to the fact that their emotions were worked upon by slave drivers to keep them in subjugation. Oftentimes white people dressed as ghosts, frightened the colored people into doing many things under protest. The “ghosts” were feared far more...

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Slave Narrative of Richard Toler

Interviewer: Ruth Thompson Person Interviewed: Richard Toler Location: Cincinnati, Ohio Place of Residence: 515 Poplar St., Cincinnati, Ohio Occupation: Blacksmith Ruth Thompson, Interviewing Graff, Editing Ex-Slave Interviews Hamilton Co., District 12 Cincinnati RICHARD TOLER 515 Poplar St., Cincinnati, O. “Ah never fit in de wah; no suh, ah couldn’t. Mah belly’s been broke! But ah sho’ did want to, and ah went up to be examined, but they didn’t receive me on account of mah broken stomach. But ah sho’ tried, ’cause ah wanted to be free. Ah didn’t like to be no slave. Dat wasn’t good times.” Richard Toler, 515 Poplar Street, century old former slave lifted a bony knee with one gnarled hand and crossed his legs, then smoothed his thick white beard. His rocking chair creaked, the flies droned, and through the open, unscreened door came the bawling of a calf from the building of a hide company across the street. A maltese kitten sauntered into the front room, which served as parlor and bedroom, and climbed complacently into his lap. In one corner a wooden bed was piled high with feather ticks, and bedecked with a crazy quilt and an number of small, brightly-colored pillows; a bureau opposite was laden to the edges with a collection of odds and ends-a one-legged alarm clock, a coal oil lamp, faded aritifical flowers in a gaudy vase, a...

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Biography of Ernest L. Ballard

The clerk of the district court and ex-ofificio auditor and recorder of Owyhee County, Idaho, residing in Silver City, is a native of the state of Virginia, his birth having occurred in Lynchburg on the 1st of February 1862. His ancestors, leaving their home in England, crossed the briny deep to the New World and became residents of Pennsylvania at the time William Penn founded the colony. They participated in the events which go to make up the early history of the Keystone state, and representatives of the name also fought for America in the war of 1812. Removing from Pennsylvania to Virginia, the family became identified with the interests of the south. Henry Clay Ballard, the father of our subject, was born, reared and educated in the Old Dominion and became a railroad contractor. He married Miss Sally Pollard, and during the civil war he served as a captain in General Munford’s cavalry in the Confederate army. He continued to reside in Virginia until 1880, when he removed to Colorado. He is now engaged in railroad contracting in British Columbia, and has reached the age of fifty-seven years. For many years he has been a member of the Masonic fraternity and in his life exemplifies the beneficent teachings of that order. His wife died in 1880, in her fortieth year, leaving the husband and two children to mourn...

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Biographical Sketch of O. C. Saum

Saum, O. C.; real estate; born, Virginia, March 8, 1872; son of James W. and Sarah E. Maphis Saum; educated, public schools, Shenandoah County Virginia, and business College, Lynchburg, Va.; married, Springfield, O., December, 1899, Vesta Josephine Rupert; issue, two daughters, 12 and 5 years of age; came to Cleveland in October, 1895; business for himself since 1900; specializing in real estate service; primarily to the buyer, for past two years; handled business for out-of-town investors; has done much to promote real estate interests of Cleveland, and is enthusiastic upon real estate organization; has been vice pres. and sec’y of The Real Estate Board, and a member of the valuation committee to appraise the Union Depot site; sec’y The Cushman Land. & Investment Co.; also of The Hiram House Social Settlement; member Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, Real Estate Board, and Fire Insurance...

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Saponi Tribe

Saponi Indians. One of the eastern Siouan tribes, formerly living in North Carolina and Virginia, but now extinct. The tribal name was occasionally applied to the whole group of Ft Christanna tribes, also occasionally included under Tutelo. That this tribe belonged to the Siouan stock has been placed beyond doubt by the investigations of Hale and Mooney. Their language appears to have been the same as the Tutelo to the extent that the people of the two tribes could readily understand each other. Mooney has shown that the few Saponi words recorded are Siouan. Lederer mentions a war in which the Saponi seem to have been engaged with the Virginia settlers as early as 1654-56, the time of the attack by the Cherokee, probably in alliance with them. The first positive notice is by Lederer (1670), who informs us that he stopped a few days at Sapon, a town of the Tutelo confederacy, situated on a tributary of the upper Roanoke. This village was apparently on Otter river, southwest of Lynchburg, Virginia. Pintahae is mentioned also as another of their villages near by. It is evident that the Saponi and Tutelo were living at that time in close and apparently confederated relation. In 1671 they were visited by Thomas Batts and others accompanied by two Indian guides. After traveling nearly due west from the mouth of the Appomattox about...

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Biography of Charles Owen

Charles Owen. The production of oil and gas forms one of the most important industries in the State of Kansas. It is not only a source of great wealth, but at the same time serves as a medium of employment for a great many men and a means of livelihood for a great number of dependent families. In this respect Montgomery County is one of the busiest and most productive portions of the state. The cultivation of its fertile farms and the operation of its almost inexhaustible gas and oil wells go hand in hand to make it one of the prime contributors to the bountiful prosperity of a great region. To supervise all the details of the working of one of the concerns engaged in the production of oil and gas requires a man of more than ordinary energy, sound judgment and thorough knowledge, and such an individual is Charles Owen, president of the Caney Pipe Line Company, and one of the best known figures in oil and gas circles of Southern Kansas and Oklahoma. Mr. Owen was born at Lynchburg, Campbell County, Virginia, in February, 1870, and is a son of Dr. William O. Owen. His father was born at Lynchburg, in 1820, was educated for the medical profession, graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, and for many years was engaged in...

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Biography of Rev. William Jackson Haydon

Rev. Haydon is the son of Jarvis and Harriet Ann (Mitchell) Haydon, and was born near Lynchburg, Virginia, June 8th, 1835. His father (Jarvis) was born in the same State, February 1st, 1797, and died there February 10th, 1852. His mother was a daughter of John Mitchell, and was born in Amherst county, Virginia, April 18th, 1805. She was married at sixteen years old, and died August 7th, 1850. William Jackson Haydon was the third born in a family of six children, all but two of whom are dead. The other surviving one, Alexander, still lives in Virginia, engaged in railroading. The subject of this sketch received his education at Lynchburg, and Lewisburg, West Virginia, and at an early age professed religion and joined the Old School Presbyterian church. After leaving school Mr. Haydon engaged in the mercantile business at Lewisburg, and was afterwards engaged in teaching. He came to Missouri in the spring, of 1860, landing at Louisiana, where he remained for some time engaged in teaching in Pike county. Subsequently he was engaged in merchandising in Mexico, Missouri, for about five years. Although the war was raging, Mr. Haydon’s zeal in the Christian cause would not allow him to remain idle and he promptly and earnestly engaged in church and Sabbath schoolwork. He was elected a deacon in the church, and his devotion to church work was...

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