Location: Lowell Massachusetts

Biography of Alvah Charles Ferrin

Alvah Charles Ferrin, a retired contractor and builder of Concord, who served in the United States Navy during the Civil War, was born in Plymouth, N.H., August 13, 1835, son of Daniel E. and Mary Jane (Durgin) Ferrin. His father was a native of Hebron, N.H.; and his mother was born in Buxton, Me. On the father’s side he is a descendant of Revolutionary patriots. His education, which was begun in the public schools of Lowell, Mass., where 1841, was completed when he was about sixteen years old in Hebron, N.H., to which they went in 1842. He started in life as a farmer. After following that occupation for a short time, he went, in 1853, to Boston, Mass., where he obtained employment as an expressman. Five years later he returned to his native State, and, settling in Concord, learned the mason’s trade. At this he worked as a journeyman until he became a member of the firm of Gately & Ferrin, contractors and builders, with whom he was associated until he undertook to serve in the Civil War. This event occurred August 19, 1864, when he entered the United States Navy at Portsmouth, N.H. In January, 1865, he sailed from the Kittery navy yard on board the United States steamer “Albatross” for Mobile Bay, where the vessel joined the West Gulf squadron, under the command of Commodore Thatcher,...

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Biography of Frank H. Chapman

Frank H. Chapman, a leading druggist of Franklin Falls, was born in Lowell, Mass., May 29, 1848, son of Eben L. Chapman, of New Market, N.H. The father, who was born in 1807, removed to Lawrence, Mass., and was there a successful grocer for forty-one years, retiring from active business in 1860. He married for his first wife a Towle, of New Market, who died leaving no children. For his second wife he married Mrs. Martha J. Hilton Hanscomb, and their children were: Frank H., the subject of this sketch; and Charles, who died at the age of six years. Frank H. Chapman received his education in the common and high schools of Lawrence, Mass. In 1864 he entered the employ of H. M. Whitney, a druggist, to learn the business, remaining there for five years. Afterward, in Brooklyn, N.Y., he was employed in the store of Emil Heydenreich & Co. for three years. In 1875 he came to Franklin Falls, and purchased the drug store of E. H. Sturtevant, whom he succeeded in the business, continuing alone until 1893, when he sold one-half interest to Charles Eddy. The store is now carried on under the style of F. H. Chapman & Co. They have a full line of drugs, medicines, etc., and have succeeded in building up a large and successful business. Mr. Chapman now leaves the entire...

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Biography of John F. Bartlett

John F. Bartlett, Postmaster of Suncook and an ex-member of the New Hampshire legislature, was born in Newton Upper Falls, Mass., November 15, 1836, son of George W. and Jane (Nickelson) Bartlett. His grandfather, Abijah Bartlett, who served as a sailor in the War of 1812, was a rope-maker in Salem, Mass. Abijah married Elizabeth Bartlett, of Marblehead, and reared a family of six children. George W. Bartlett, born in Marblehead, resided in Newton Upper Falls and later in Nashua, N.H., where he followed the business of store-keeper. He died at the age of forty-five years. In politics he was originally a Whig, but later became a Democrat. His wife, Jane, who was a native of Marblehead, became the mother of eleven children, of whom Mary Ann, John F., Benjamin B., and Susan M. are living. Mary Ann married for her Clark T. Rose, by whom she has two children-William C. and Lilly. By her second husband, Ozem Hurd, she has had no children. Susan M. is the wife of Albert F. Barney, of Laconia, N.H.; and her children are: Henrietta and Carrie. Mrs. George W. Bartlett, who is still living, was born July 4, 1806, is now over ninety years old, and enjoys good health. She is a member of the Methodist church. John F. Bartlett attended schools in Newton Upper Falls, Mass., and in Nashua and Hookset,...

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Biography of Percival G. Lowe

Percival G. Lowe, for many years prominent in the public affairs of the city and county of Leavenworth, worth, was, in his young manhood, a typical plainsman and Kansas dragoon. He was essentially a man of action, and his only literary production in book form, “Five Years a Dragoon,” presents many cloarcut pictures of those early times. As a life-member and president (1893) of the State Historical Society he has also placed on record many valuable papers dealing with those subjects with which he was so practically identified. Mr. Lowe was born at Randolph, Coos County, New York, September 29, 1828, spent much of his boyhood and youth in Lowell, Massachusetts, and before he was twenty-one had spent three years upon the seas, engaged mainly in voyages to the West Indies and South America. In 1849 he joined the regular army and was stationed at Fort Leavenworth. In 1854, at the conclusion of his five-years’ service in the United States army, Mr. Lowe was appointed superintendent of transportation for Maj. E. A. Ogden, and was engaged in the construction of Fort Riley. He served as master of transportation both in General Sumner’s expedition against the Cheyennes, in 1857, and for General Johnson’s army sent against the Mormons in 1858. In the following year he severed his connection with the army and engaged in business in Denver and Leavenworth, finally...

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Biography of Allen, Charles Herbert

Allen, Charles Herbert, son of Otis and Louisa (Bixby) Allen, was born in Lowell, Middlesex County, April 15, 1848. He was educated in the public schools of his native city; prepared for college, entered Amherst, from which he was graduated in the class of 1869, receiving his A. M. in course in 1872. His first connection with commercial life was in the lumber business, in which he has ever since been engaged, under the firm name of Otis Allen & Son. Mr. Allen was married in Manchester, N. H., Nov. 10, 1870, to Harriet C., daughter of James and Sarah B. (Chase) Dean. Of this union were two children; Bertha and Louise Allen. Mr. Allen is a member of the Masonic order; has been a member of the Lowell school board; was a member of the House of Representatives in 1881 and ‘ 82, serving in the two years on the committee on railroads, rules and orders, and bills in the third reading (chairman); he was a member of the state senate in 1883, serving on the committee on prisons (chairman) and street railways; he was elected to the national Congress in 1884, and re-elected in 1886. In 1888 he declined a re-nomination. In the forty-ninth Congress Mr. Allen served on the committee on Indian affairs; In the fiftieth Congress served on committee on post-office and post roads—an important...

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Biographical Sketch of Alger, Alpheus B.

Alger, Alpheus B., son of Edwin A. and Amanda (Buswell) Alger, was born in Lowell, Middlesex County, October 8, 1854. His early education was accomplished at the public schools of his native place. In the Lowell high school he fitted for college, and was graduated at Harvard with the class of 1875. The same year he entered the Harvard law school, and a year later continued the study of the law in the office of the Hon. Josiah G. Abbott of Boston. He was admitted to the bar in 1877, and began the practice of law in connection with his father’s firm, Brown & Alger, in the city of Boston, with his residence in Cambridge. Mr. Alger has been actively identified with the Democratic Party in politics. He has held the positions of chairman and secretary of the Democratic city committee of Cambridge. He is also a member of the congressional district committee. In 1884 he was chosen alderman, and acted on the committees on claims, police, ordinances, and a new bridge to Boston. In 1886 and ’87 he was a member of the Senate, serving as chairman on the committee on engrossed bills and mercantile affairs, and as member of the committees of public service, expediting legislative business, judiciary, bills on the third reading, rules and liquor law. He was also a member of the state committee sent...

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Biographical Sketch of Allen, Richard Beman

Allen, Richard Beman, son of John and May (Eagan) Allen, was born in Tewksbury, Middlesex County, January 25, 1851. He was educated in the common schools of Tewksbury and the Lowell Business College. He began business as clerk in a grocery store; remained in the business three years, and then learned a trade—watchmaker and jeweler; was a member of the firm of Cluin & Allen for three years; sold out, and became a member of the firm of Allen Brothers. Mr. Allen was married in Lowell, October 14, 1884, to Annie daughter of Peter and Bridget Angulin Sheehan. Of this union are three children: Mary, Julia, and Gertrude Allen. Mr. Allen is a member of the board of trustees of Ancient Order of Foresters; Y. M. C. L. A.; vice-justice Order Iron Hall; member of the Middlesex Mechanic Association, and of the Democratic city committee; was member of the Lowell common council 1887 and 1888, and was a member of the House of Representatives in 1889, serving on committee on public charitable institutions. Mr. Allen, while not desiring publicity, has many times been honored by his fellow citizens by their endorsement at the polls; and to his quiet but effectual work is due, in a great measure, much of the success of his party in the “Spindle City.” He is a firm believer in clear and honorable methods of...

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Biography of Daniel O. Pearson

DANIEL O. PEARSON. – One of the most respected and honored of all of Washington’s citizens is the pioneer of Stanwood whose face looks at us from the opposite page. He is one of those whose integrity and universal kindness, as well as public spirit and business enterprise, are of the truest need in laying the foundations of a community. Mr. Pearson was born at Lowell, Massachusetts, April 11, 1846. His parents were Daniel and Susan (Brown) Pearson, who now reside near Coupville, Washington. The first removal of the family was to Salmon Falls, while Daniel was yet an infant. There they remained till he was twelve years old. Returning to Lowell, they gave the son the best of educational advantages at the High School of that city. Having a collegiate education in hope, he was already well on in the preparatory course, when the tempest of the Civil war in 1861 called him, with so many of the other boys of the nation, to her defense. Mr. Pearson was one of the one-hundred day men, enlisting as a volunteer in Company G, Sixth Massachusetts Infantry. At the expiration of his term of service, he returned home and spent his time at the painter’s trade, which he had previously learned. Soon after the close of the war, Mercer’s Colony scheme, which created so much interest on this coast, and...

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Biography of C. K. Merriam, M.D.

C.K. MERRIAM, M.D. – Mr. Merriam was born June 29, 1848, in Houlton, Aroostook County, Maine, being the eighth child in a family of ten children, the third and fourth being girls. His father, Lewis Merriam, when a young man, went from New Salem, Massachusetts, to Maine, in 1832, and married and settled in Houlton in 1833. He is now eighty-two years old, and is coming West this summer. The parents were poor, and lived on a farm two miles from the village. In early childhood he was taught to pick wool, quill yarn, etc., as the wool of the farm was manufactured into garments in the family mill, the motive power of which was supplied principally by his mother; and with boyish impatience he watched his father make his first pair of shoes by candle light. If a book, slate, or pocket money for a Fourth of July celebration were needed, the wild strawberry patch frequently contributed the means. If a handsled, cart or miniature mill were desired, it was found in the workshop over the woodshed after a few days’ work with the lumber and tools; while the yearly sugar camp in the maple grove furnished amusement for the boys as well as syrup for the family. The farm was sold; and the family moved about two miles to a sawmill which the father built on the...

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Biographical Sketch of A. J. Sanborn

A. J. Sanborn, master mechanic, I. & St. L. Shops, Mattoon; was born in Acton, York Co., Me., in 1826; having lost his mother when but 11 years of age, he left home, and, making his way to Boston, went on board a vessel, and was absent two years on a voyage; after coming into port, he made known to his father and family his adventures for the two years past; he served seven years on the sea, sailing as second mate on board the ship Vesta, of Boston, and the brig Yucatan, in the South American trade; at the age of 21 years, he began his trade in the Lowell Machine-Shops, at Lowell, Mass; here he remained two years; he next went to Boston and worked in the locomotive-shops of Hinckley & Drury for eighteen months; thence to Lawrence, Mass.; to the Essex shops, one year; in 1858, or 1859, he came west to East St. Louis, and took charge of the erecting department of the O. & M. R. R; in 1867, he took charge of the machinery on the Vandalia R. R., and, in 1873, he took charge of the works for the I. & St. L. R. R. at Mattoon; Mr. Sanborn is truly a self-made man; his education has been derived in the school of experience, and, whatever he undertakes to perform, he executes...

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Biography of Edward F. Groark

EDWARD F. GROARK-Insurance has for many years held the attention of Edward F. Groark, whose usefulness in this realm in Western Massachusetts is widely recognized. With interests centering in North Adams he covers a considerable territory in this immediate section and his work is contributing definitely to the progress of the community. Mr. Groark’s practical ability and progressive attitude are constructive influences in the local progress as well as in his own success. He is a son of Patrick and Margaret (Feign) Groark, esteemed citizens of New Haven, Connecticut. Edward F. Groark was born in New Haven, September 11, 1878. Receiving his early education in the local public schools he was graduated from the New Haven High School in the class of 1896. Upon the completion of his studies he secured a position in the accounting department of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad offices, in New Haven, and there gained valuable experience in the business affairs. He was still a young man when he entered the employ of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company as their agent in New Haven, then later became assistant manager of their interest at Lowell, Massachusetts. From that point he was transferred to Burlington, Vermont, where he also served as assistant manager, until October of Ig22, when he was placed in charge of the North Adams agency in the capacity of manager....

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Biography of Albert Parsons

ALBERT PARSONS, expert in agriculture, cattle raiser, and dairy farmer of North Amherst, Massachusetts, was born June 1, 1883, in North Amherst, the son ‘ of Howard Albert Parsons. The family name of Parsons is derived from the Latin word persona, a mask. In early times actors wore a mask of wood to project their voices, a suggestion of the speaking-trumpet and telephone of later years. The actor came to be called after the mask he wore dramatis personae. The word had a two-fold meaning. In ecclesiastical language it was referable to a man of dignity, and bestowed upon one who had a benefice or living, who committed the cure of souls to a vicar. Thus actors and parsons derived their names from the same root. The early form, the parson’s son, or the parson’s John, was finally abbreviated to Parsons. The heraldic designs of this family were: Arms-Gules, two chevronels ermine between three eagles displayed or. Crest-An eagle’s leg erased at the thigh or, standing on a leopard’s face, gules. Among those of the family in America most conspicuous for their attainments have been the learned Theophilus Parsons, Chief Justice of Massachusetts; Andrew Parsons, Governor of Michigan; Lewis P. Parsons, Governor of Alabama; and General Lewis B. Parsons. The oldest known Parsons of record, under the herald’s visitations, was John of Cuddington, A. D. 1284. In the roll...

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Biography of Frederic Louis Flint

Frederic Louis Flint. Among the solid, reliable men of Ottawa County no one stands higher in public esteem and confidence than Frederic Louis Flint, president of the Minneapolis National Bank of Minneapolis, Kansas. Mr. Flint’s paternal ancestor, Thomas Flint, immigrated from Wales to America in the early part of the seventeenth century, he being one of the first settlers of Salem Village, Massachusetts, now South Danvers. Frederic Louis Flint was born at Lowell, Massachusetts, June 11, 1855. His parents were Joseph K. and Hulda (Wilder) Flint. His paternal grandfather, Joseph Flint, was born at Salem, Massachusetts, April 19, 1784, and died at Francistown, New Hampshire, in 1863. His paternal great-grandfather was Joseph Flint, who was born at Danvers, Massachusetts, April 21, 1759, and died in 1787. This great-grandfather fought at the battle of Bunker Hill. Joseph K. Flint was born at Francistown, New Hampshire, in 1817, and died at Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1893. His life was spent in New England. He was reared in New Hampshire but was married in Vermont and then moved to Lowell, Massachusetts, where he was employed as an expert pattern maker. He married Hulda Wilder, who was born in 1826 at Waitsfield, Vermont, and who died at Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1894. To this union was born a family of seven children, as follows: Lydia Viola, deceased; Almy J., artist, of Lowell, Massachusetts; Ella M.,...

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Biography of William Wallace Spaulding

William Wallace Spaulding was born at Chalmsford, Massachusetts, near the city of Lowell, in 1839. He is of English descent, his ancestors having emigrated from England and settled in Chalmsford several generations ago. His early life was spent at home on a farm, during which period he received a good common school education which was supplemented by one year’s course of instruction at an academy in Mount Vernon, New Hampshire. After leaving school he went to Boston, where for four years he was employed in a butcher shop. He then purchased his employer’s business and conducted it for a year, when, his health failing, he was forced to abandon it. With the hope of finding a climate more congenial to his health -and where he might better his worldly fortune, he and his wife started for the Pacific slope by the way of the Isthmus of Panama, arriving in San Pranscico in the spring of 1862. In the following fall he came to Portland, at the time of his arrival not possessing a dollar in the world. Among strangers and without money, with himself and wife to support, his prospects were anything but encouraging, but with a disposition not easily discouraged and a willingness to labor at any honest work which would promise a livelihood, he soon found employment. For one year he was employed by the firm of...

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