Location: Lewis and Clark County MT

Early Residents of Helena, Montana

Isaac D. McCutcheon, born in New York in 1840, removed to Mich, with his parents in 1846, and was there educated. He began teaching school at the age of 18 years, and continued to teach for 5 years, after which he studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1868. He practised his profession in Charlotte, Michigan, until 1882, when he was appointed secretary of Montana. He resigned in 1883 to return to the practice of the law. F. S. Witherbee, born in Flint, Michigan, in 1860, removed to Louisville, in 1873. He was educated for a physician, graduating in Philadelphia 1883, but not liking his profession, he became a publisher in Washington D.C. He sold out his business in 1888, and came to Helena, where he engaged in real estate, organizing the Witherbee and Hunter Estate, Loan, Investment Co., Limited. O. K. Allen, born in the state of New York, in 1852, received a collegiate education, and in 1876 went to Colorado, where he remained until 1883, when he came to Montana and engaged in mining. In 1880 he acquired the Gould mine, and organized a stock company to develop the property. The mine has produced over $1,000,000, and is still producing richly. F. P. Sterling was born in Elkhorn, Wisconsin, in 1843, and was educated in his native town. In 1861 he entered the union army,...

Read More

Lewis and Clarke County, Montana 1870-1888

Lewis and Clarke County, occupying a central position, although comparatively small in extent, having only 2,900 square miles, was the second in population, its inhabitants numbering about 13,000, and its assessed valuation being in 1884 over $8,000,000. Its mines have already been spoken of. From 135 farms in Prickly Pear Valley was harvested, in 1878, 25,000 bushels of wheat, 40,000 bushels of oats, 15,000 bushels of barley, or an average of over 500 bushels of grain to every farm. Besides the grain crop, 7,000 tons of hay were harvested, over 300 tons of turnips and cabbages, 40,000 bushels of potatoes, and 15,000 bushels of pease. The county grazes 30,000 cattle and 25,000 sheep, the wool clip from 18,000 head being 83,000 pounds. The livestock in 1884 was valued at $1,000,000. Helena, the county seat, made a port of entry in 1867, and also the capital of Montana, was in all respects a progressive modern town. With a population of 7,000 in 1883, which had increased from 4,000 in 1879, its four national banks had on deposit $3,000,000, and sold a large amount of exchange annually, besides purchasing gold-dust and silver bullion to the amount of amount $2,000,000. The first, or Montana National Bank, was instituted June 24, 1872. James King president, Charles E Deer cashier, D. S. Wade, W. E. Gillette, William Chumasero, James Fergus, and George Steele directors....

Read More

1863 Settlers in Lewis and Clarke County, Montana

Nicholas Kessler, Helena, born in Germany, May 26, 1833, immigrated to the U. S. in 1854, going first to Ohio and then to Illinois, where he was in the grain, flour, and general produce business. In 1800 he went to Pike’s Peak, Colorado, where he mined in different localities until 1803, when he went to “Virginia City, where he kept a bakery and a drinking-saloon for a few months. In 1864 went home to Germany, returning to Montana in 1804 and establishing a brewery within two miles of Helena. He also made brick at the rate of 2,000,000 or 3,000,000 yearly, with old-fashioned hand-moulds, employing in brewery and brick-yard 45 men, at wages varying from $40 to $210 per month, with board and rooms. Used 9,000 bushels of barley in 1883, most of it raised in Montana, some coming from Cal. Made 2,852 barrels of whiskey. There being no facilities for education, his school district being poor, Kessler erected a brick schoolhouse at a cost of $700, and employed a teacher at $65 per month. William James English, Prickly Pear Valley, was born in Ireland, in August 1834, and emigrated to Canada at the age of 9 years, removing to Nebraska 3 years afterward. From Nebraska he went to Colorado by mule-team, and thence “to Virginia City in 1863. Was employed mining at wages, which were from $6 to...

Read More

Biography of Newell H. Webster

Newell H. Webster, now a prominent and affluent resident of Helena, Mont., was born November 29, 1836, in Henniker, a son of Jesse and Susan C. (Newell) Webster. An account of his Newell was known as a remarkably bright lad, showing even then the vigor of intellect and strength of character inherited from his mother. After leaving school he learned the tailor’s trade from his father, subsequently spending two years as a clerk in Boston. His health failing, a change of climate was advised; and, little thinking what the future years had in store for him, he bade farewell to his friends, and started westward, arriving in Minnesota early in 1861. At Hastings he joined a party engaged in surveying for a railway, being employed as chain carrier. His investigating turn of mind and natural desire for knowledge caused him to note the transit’s record in a book of his own. Soon after he became expert in the use of the instruments, whereupon the engineer in charge placed him in charge of the transit. When the surveying in that State was completed, he received and accepted a flattering offer of an engagement in the same line of business in Colorado, where he went in 1863. He was subsequently selected to lead an exploring party into Idaho and Montana; and he was at East Bannack, Montana Territory, when the settlement...

Read More

Biography of Henry Greve

Henry Greve, a member of Governor Hyde’s staff and one of the prominent business men of St. Louis, has made his home in this city since 1875 and through the intervening period his steady progress and advancement along business lines have brought him to a place of prominence and distinction, for he is now sole owner and president of the John Wahl Commission Company and is also a director of the LibertyCentral Trust Company. A native of Germany, he was born in Velen, Westphalia, on the 6th of March, 1856, his parents being Henry and Maria Anna (Brueggemann) Greve, who were also natives of Germany, where the father engaged extensively and successfully in dealing in live stock. Liberal educational advantages were accorded Henry Greve, who attended the public and high schools of his native country and afterward became a student in the university of Coesfeld in Westphalia. His liberal training constituted the foundation upon which has been built his later success. America, “the land of opportunity,” attracted him in 1873, and bidding adieu to friends and native country, he sailed for the new world, first taking up his abode in Dyersville, Iowa, where he initiated his business career by accepting a clerkship in a general store. He afterward removed to Quincy, Illinois, where he was again connected with mercantile interests and later resided for a time in Helena, Montana,...

Read More

Biography of William A. Hall

Honored and respected by all, there is no man in northern Idaho who occupies a more enviable position in professional circles than William A. Hall, who for many years has devoted his energies to the practice of law and to the spread of the gospel among his fellow men. Born in England, February 15, 1847, he was five years of age when brought to America by his parents, William and Lucy (Atkinson) Hall, who crossed the Atlantic with their six children and became residents of Walworth county, Wisconsin. There the father engaged in farming up to the time of his death, which occurred in the fortieth year of his age. His widow afterward married William Ambler, and by that union had four children. Mr. Ambler enlisted in the Union army in 1862, as a member of the Twenty-seventh Wisconsin Infantry, and after a year’s active service was taken ill and died, at Helena, Arkansas, in 1863. The mother reared her family of children, and died at Traverse City, Michigan, in the seventy-seventh year of her age. Four of the children of her first marriage and four of the last survive her. William A. Hall is indebted to the public-school system of the Badger state for the educational privileges accorded him. He was reared upon the home farm, and when his stepfather entered the army, the management and care of...

Read More

Biography of Hon. George B. Rogers

Some men achieve success almost instantaneously, some by slow accretion, others only after long and patient working and waiting. The experience of men who are willing to work persistently and intelligently and wait calmly goes to prove that success may surely be attained during an ordinary lifetime, and no man not cut off at an untimely age need work and wait in vain. These reflections have been suggested by a consideration of the career of Hon. George B. Rogers, receiver of the United States land office at Blackfoot, Idaho, who is one of the most prominent and successful citizens of the state. He was born in Dodgeville, Iowa County, Wisconsin, February 22, 1842. His father, John Rogers, was born in England and there married Miss Hannah Bailey. They came to the United States in 1837, bringing with them two daughters, named Susan and Elizabeth, and located at Mineral Point, Wisconsin, where Mr. Rogers engaged in lead-mining and later became a farmer. He died in 1880, aged seventy-six years, and his wife passed away in 1882, aged seventy-three. They were lifelong members and supporters of the Methodist Episcopal church. Six more children were born to them in Wisconsin, of whom George B. Rogers was the second in order of nativity and of whom two others are living. George B. Rogers was brought up on his father’s farm and at a...

Read More

Biography of Albert Small

Albert Small, the senior member of the firm of Small & Emery, prominent wholesale dealers in and manufacturers of lumber, and proprietors of the Lewiston Lumber Mills, is a native of the province of New Brunswick, born September 30, 1841, and is of English and Scotch ancestry. His great-grandfather Small was a sea captain who emigrated to the state of Maine, where for many years he made his home and headquarters. He attained the advanced age of eighty-seven years, while his wife, who bore the maiden name of Mitchell, reached the remarkable age of ninety-seven. They were the parents of six sons and seven daughters, and the first member of the family to pass away was fifty-two years of age at the time of his death. One of the number, Daniel Small, the father of our subject, was born in New Brunswick, and having arrived at years of maturity married Lavina Monroe, by whom he had nine children, Albert being the third in order of birth. The father passed away at the age of sixty-two years, and the mother died about the same time, at the age of sixty years. They were industrious farming people, and were members of the Baptist church. During his early boyhood Abert Small accompanied his parents on their removal to the Pine Tree state, and he is indebted to the public-school system of Maine...

Read More

Biography of Walter Hoge

Walter Hoge is one of the most prominent representatives of the industrial interests of southeastern Idaho. He makes his home in Paris, where he is connected with the lumber business, both manufacturing and selling lumber. The volume of his trade enables him to furnish employment to a large force of workmen and thus he adds to the general prosperity of the community and to the welfare of the town. Mr. Hoge was born on the 18th of November 1844, and is of English lineage. His parents, Walter and Elizabeth Hoge, were also natives of the same land, and the father supported his family by working at the blacksmith’s trade. In his religious belief he was a Presbyterian, and died in that faith in 1866, when sixty-six years of age. His wife long survived him and departed this life in 1882, when eighty-three years of age. They were the parents of eleven children, but only four are yet living. Mr. Hoge, of this review, the youngest of the family, accompanied his parents on their removal to Scotland in his early boyhood and was there educated. He served for four years as an apprentice to the butcher’s trade and followed that business until his emigration to America in 1862. Having come to the New World he took up his abode on Vancouver’s Island and began work in the mines of British...

Read More

Biography of Alexander E. Mayhew

The rewards of purity in public life are many, but one of the most important and apparent is continuance in public life. This is true everywhere, and of course it is true in Idaho, where the fact is emphasized and illustrated by the career of Judge Mayhew of Wallace, Shoshone County, Idaho. At least he lives at Wallace, but he is a man of the west and for the west, and his influence is active and far-reaching. Alexander E. Mayhew, son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Conklin) Mayhew, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, March 31, 1830. His father, a native of Philadelphia, was for many years a merchant of that city, but died in New Jersey in 1871, and his mother, born in Philadelphia, died in New Jersey, in 1887. The boyhood days of Judge Mayhew were passed in Philadelphia, where he attended the public schools and was graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, with the class of 1852. He read law under the preceptorship of William D. Baker, one of the leading Philadelphia lawyers of his time and one of the most successful in the country, and in 18c; q he located at Atchison, Kansas, where he continued his legal studies in the office of Abel & Stringfellow, being admitted to the bar in 1856. He entered upon the practice of his profession in Atchison and served one year...

Read More

Biography of William Edward Delehant

William Edward Delehant, organizer and promoter of the Cardinal Drug Company of Muskogee, conducting both a whole-sale and retail business, has long been recognized as a dynamic force in the commercial circles of Muskogee. Starting in business here with an extremely limited capital, he has steadily developed his interests and the scope of his activities until his position in commercial circles is one of prominence and leadership. He has ever been a man of broad vision in relation to business affairs and his life record should serve as a source of encouragement and inspiration to others, showing what can be accomplished through individual effort. Mr. Delehant was born in Buffalo, New York, on the 6th of April, 1873, and is a son of Michael Vincent and Bridget (Maloy) Delehant. The father devoted his life to the milling business, operating a flour mill for an extended period. William E. Delehant supplemented his public school training by study in the University of Buffalo at Buffalo, New York, from which he was graduated in 1892 on the completion of a course in the department of pharmacy. He afterward devoted two years to service in the United States Marine Hospital at Buffalo, New York, filling the position of hospital steward. He next went to Helena, Montana, where he remained for five years and during that period was engaged in the retail drug business....

Read More

Hancock, Robert – Obituary

Formerly of Cove 1921-2004 Robert Brooks Hancock, 82, of York, Mont., and formerly of Cove died June 1 at St. Peter’s Hospital in Helena, Mont. Burial was at Montana State Veterans Cemetery at Fort Harrison, Mont. Mr. Hancock was born Dec. 10, 1921, to Charles and Brooks George Hancock on the family farm near Cove. He graduated from Cove High School and served in the South Pacific for the Navy during World War II. In 1945 he married Jean Horner. The couple lived in Missoula, Mont., where he worked at Westmont Tractor and for Missoula Cartage. After his wife’s death, he married Lorraine Reese in 1985. They moved to York in 1998. He enjoyed camping, fishing, woodworking, gardening, reading, especially about World War II, and being with his grandchildren. Survivors include his wife of York; his mother and father-in-law, Archie and Nola Smith of Helena; a sister, Phyllis Tarter of Cove; two grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; four stepchildren, Mary Yuricic of East Helena, Curt Reese of Bozeman, Karen Reese-Schwenk and Mark Reese, both of Helena; five stepgrandchildren, and Bill Dellinger, who was like a son. A son, Gary, and a brother-in-law, Vic Tarter, both died earlier. Memorials may be made in lieu of flowers to any charity. Observer – Obituaries May 31 – June 5, 2004 Published: July 1,...

Read More

Grewell, Purdy Thomas – Obituary

Purdy T. Grewell, 68, York, died Sunday [January 24, 1971] at St. John’s Catholic Hospital following an extended illness. Funeral services will be conducted at 2 p.m. Wednesday at Haglers Funeral Chapel with burial in Sunset Memorial Gardens. Grewell was born August 9, 1903 in Mabton, Wash. and attended schools there. He was employed as a heavy equipment operator on airports and general construction for several years. He resided in York since 1953 and was a member of Operating Engineer Local No. 400. Survivors include his widow, Elnora [Smith] , three sons, Tom and Clayton of Helena and John of Butte; five daughters, Mrs. Myrna Swan of East Helena; Mary Lyna Hall of Butte; Helena O’Larey of Pasco, Wa.; Ruthie Price of the Helena Valley; and June Parry of Alhambra; a brother, Byron, of Pasco; a sister Mrs. Florence Parsel of Ellensburg, Wash. and 15 grandchildren. Contributed by: Shelli...

Read More

Spalding, Minnie Elizabeth Bonner – Obituary

Longtime Helena resident Minnie E. (Peg) Spalding of 912 Park Lane, died early today [March 30, 1981] at St. Peter’s Community Hospital. She was 74. She came to Helena in 1925. Mrs. Spalding had worked for the Internal Revenue Service and the State Department of Income Tax. She retired in 1962. She was born on December 28, 1906 in Alhambra to Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Bonner. She attended schools in Townsend and graduated from high school at Spokane, Wash. She married Charles A. Spalding on July 3, 1926 in Boulder. Mrs. Spalding was a member of the Josephine Hepner Chapter No. 89, O.E.S. Survivors include her husband, Charles; a daughter Sharleen Spalding Foley of Clancy; a sister, Ada Bailey of Helena; a grandson, Charles Emmett Seabrook of Helena; and several nieces and nephews. Funeral arrangements are pending at Retz Funeral Home. Contributed by: Shelli...

Read More

Paul, Patye Jo Collins Hillmon Mrs. – Obituary

Patye Jo Hillmon Paul, 77, a former Richland resident, died Aug. 23, 2005, at the Kirkland Hospice Center in Kirkland, Wash. For nearly four years Patye had been fighting courageously and was very much determined to beat her advanced inflammatory breast cancer. She was very alert and involved with her caregivers and family to her death. She always held out hope from the day she was diagnosed, and continued to enjoy each day as much as possible. Visitations will be Friday from noon to 7 p.m. at Gray’s West & Co. Pioneer Chapel, 1500 Dewey Ave. Recitation of the Rosary will be Friday at 7 p.m. at the chapel. Father Julian Cassar will be the celebrant. Her funeral will be Saturday at 10 a.m. at Gray’s West & Co., with Jack Pittman of Baker City Christian Church officiating. Interment will follow at Mount Hope Cemetery. Patye Jo was born March 13, 1928, in Helena, Mont., to Susie and John Collins. Patye lived in Billings, Mont., with her mother until they moved to Baker City when Patye was six. She graduated from Baker High School with the class of 1946. She remained close with many of her classmates, enjoying each and every reunion that was held. She attended Oregon State University for two years and was a member of the Delta Gamma sorority. She spoke of the Oregon State years...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest