Location: Lancaster Massachusetts

Descendants of William Sumner of Dorchester, MA

The Sumner family, to which the late Mrs. George Barstow Stetson belonged, is an old and prominent family of New England, descended from one William Sumner, who was born at Bicester, England, in 1605, son of Roger Sumner, of Bicester, Oxfordshire, and his wife Joane (Franklin).

William Sumner, the only child of Roger and Joane, married Oct. 22, 1625, Mary West, and they came to America with their four children in 1636, locating at Dorchester, Mass. He was made a freeman of the Colony May 17, 1637, and held many offices of importance, being selectman for nearly a quarter of a century. He was deputy from Dorchester to the General Court for eight years. He died Dec. 9. 1688, surviving his wife, who died June 7, 1676. Both are buried at Dorchester.

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Cook Family of Norwich Vermont

Three brothers, Samuel, Francis, and Lyman, with their two sisters, (children of Jonathan and Lydia [Aldrich] Cook), ran away from the Shaker settlement at Lancaster, Mass., where they had been placed by their parents before 1800, and came to this vicinity at an early day. Samuel settled in Norwich, and married Anna Pratt, by whom he had nine children. From Samuel the later generations of Cooks in town were descended. Francis also located in Norwich, on the farm now occupied by David Sargent, and there he lived and died. He was never married. Lyman Cook settled in Thetford. Another brother, Washington Cook, settled in New York State, and himself and his son were made prisoners by the Indians, and taken to Canada, but were subsequently released from captivity. Seventeen acres of the farm where Samuel Cook located were bought by him at auction when they were sold for taxes, and fifty acres were purchased at private sale from Stephen Percival. Leonard Cook, son of Samuel, died at Norwich, on the paternal acres, May 13, 1886, aged seventy-seven years. He was the last surviving child of his parents’ nine children, all of whom lived to have children of their own, sixty, all told. Mr. Cook‘s son, Royal E., now resides in Norwich Village, having removed from the ancestral home several years since, leaving it in the possession of his son,...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson – Indian Captivities

Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, Wife of the Rev. Joseph Rowlandson, Who Was Taken Prisoner when Lancaster was Destroyed, in the Year 1676; Written by Herself. On the 10th of February, 1676, came the Indians with great numbers 1Fifteen hundred was the number, according to the best authorities. They were the Wamponoags, led by King Philip, accompanied by the Narrhagansett, his allies, and also by the Nipmucks and Nashaways whom his artful eloquence had persuaded to join with him. upon Lancaster: their first coming was about sun-rising. Hearing the noise of some guns, we looked out; several houses were burning, and the smoke ascending to heaven. There were five persons taken in one house; the father and mother, and a sucking child they knocked on the head, the other two they took and carried away alive. There were two others, who, being out of their garrison upon occasion, were set upon, one was knocked on the head, the other escaped. Another there was, who, running along, was shot and wounded, and fell down; he begged of them his life, promising them money, as they told me, but they would not hearken to him, but knocked him on the head, stripped him naked, and split open his bowels. Another, seeing many of the Indians about his barn, ventured and went out, but was quickly shot down. There were three others belonging to the...

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Biographical Sketch of George Bartol

Bartol, George; gen. mgr. The Otis Steel Co.; born, Lancaster, Mass., May 16, 1857; educated in the public schools and graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in 1877, degree of B. S.; began career with the Otis Steel Co. in 1879, starting as chemist; elected gen. mgr. in 1898; pres. Colonial and Warner Realty Companies; director of First National Bank; interested in other corporations; member Union, University, and Civil Engineers Clubs;...

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Biography of Thomas Sawyer, Jr.

Thomas Sawyer, Jr., son of Thomas Sawyer, was born July 2, 1649, died September 5, 1736, at Lancaster. His will bequeathed to four sons and two daughters, and twelve pounds to purchase a communion vessel for the Lancaster Church. He was the first white child born in Lancaster. His capture by the Indians forms one of the most familiar stories of the Colonial period in Massachusetts. At the time of his capture he was living in the garrison with his father’s family. Queen Anne’s War was making the lives of the colonists unsafe, especially on the frontier. Indians made frequent attacks, and massacred men, women and children. On October 1695, Thomas Sawyer, Jr., his son Elias, and John Bigelow, of Marlboro, were at work in his saw mill where they were surprised and captured by the Indians. They were taken to Canada and Bigelow and young Sawyer were turned over to the French to ransom but they kept Thomas Sawyer to put to death by torture. Sawyer proposed to the French Governor that he should build a saw mill on the Chamblay River in consideration of saving his life from the Indians and giving the three captives their freedom. The French needed the mill and were glad of the opportunity. But the Indians had to be reckoned with. They insisted on burning Thomas Sawyer at the stake. They knew...

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Biography of Thomas Sawyer

Tradition says that three brothers emigrated to America from Lincolnshire, England, sailing in a ship commanded by Captain Parker, and that their names were William, Edmund and Thomas Sawyer. They arrived in 1636, although Savage does not find William and Thomas until 1643. The fact that the Rowley records show that a tract of land was set off to Thomas Sawyer and another to Edward Sawyer in 1643, one of the boundaries of each lot being upon the ocean side, shows that the three brothers were William, Edward and Thomas, and that they came early in 1643 or just previous. Edmund came over seven years earlier and whether he was a brother of the others cannot be ascertained, but all agree that Thomas Sawyer was in Lancaster a few years after living at Rowley, and his descendants multiplied by the thousands. Thomas Sawyer was born in England in 1616 and died in 1706. The line of descent is through: (II) Thomas, Jr.; (III) William; (IV) Deacon Josiah; (V) Josiah, Jr.; (VI) Rufus; (VII) Addison; and (VIII) Eugene N. Sawyer. The biography of the first two ancestors follow. Thomas Sawyer was among the first emigrants to Lancaster. Richard Linton, Lawrence Waters and Thomas Bell had gifts of land in what was afterwards Lancaster as an inducement to settle there, Thomas Sawyer coming later. He was one of the nine persons...

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