Location: Lancaster County PA

Philadelphia To Steubenville

Monday, Oct. 4, 1819.–Dr. Hall and myself left Philadelphia at 1 o’clock p. m. after taking an affectionate leave of friends and acquaintances. Fair and pleasant weather, and the roads very fine in consequence of a refreshing shower of rain which fell on the night previous to our setting out. After traveling twenty-two miles and passing some rich and well-cultivated farms we arrived at West Chester at 7 o’clock. West Chester contains about 600 inhabitants, several places of worship, a gaol, etc., etc. A man named Downey is confined in the gaol of this place for debt. He was once in affluence, but from misfortunes and some imprudence he became reduced in circumstances. During his confinement he determined to starve himself to death, and for seven days had refused nourishment of every description. Even the clergy waited on him and endeavored to dissuade him from his rash determination, offering him food of different kinds, but all without avail. He was able to stand. No doubt one or two more days will end his troubles. How long, O my country, will your cheeks continue to be crimsoned by the blush that must follow the plunging an innocent and unfortunate being, a debtor, in a dungeon, amongst murderers and cut-throats? Tuesday, Oct. 5.–Left West Chester at 7 o’clock a. m. Traveled a rough road. Passed some travelers on foot migrating to...

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Genealogy of Henry Allen Family

V154 HENRY ALLEN: was b. about 1800 in Dublin, Ireland, and m. Mary Jane Haney, who was b. about 1814 in Germany (the exact place is not known). They came to America, settled in Pine Grove, Pa., and had the following ch.: (1) John Henry: b. 1836 and d. 1902. (2) George W. (3) William Potter. (4) Henry Clay. (5) David Bole: b. 1844 and d. 1915. (6) James Johnson. (7) Matthew Gregg: b. 1854 and d. 1923. Left an orphan at an early age, he was forced to choose a career and follow it, being unable to secure any very great amount of schooling. He m. Ora Craven, who still resides in Portland, Ore. They had: (A) Harry Clay: b. 1880, at Beaver Falls, Pa. He m. Henrietta Maria Fowler and had two ch.: (a) Ray Ballard, b. 1911 in Portland, Ore. (b) Ora Lee: b. 1919 in Roosevelt, Utah. This branch now reside in Los Angeles, Calif. (B) Ada Wilella: b. 1883. (C) Eva: d. y. (D) Frank Cleveland: b. 1890. (E) George Arbuckle: b. 1892 in Salt Lake City. He m. and resides at Oakland, Calif. (F) Bertha May: b. 1895 and d. 1929. (G) Mabel: d....

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Slave Narrative of Angeline Lester

Interviewer: Frank M. Smith Person Interviewed: Angeline Lester Location: Youngstown, Ohio Place of Residence: 835 West Federal Street Story and Photo by Frank M. Smith Ex-Slaves Mahoning County, Dist. #5 Youngstown, Ohio The Story of MRS. ANGELINE LESTER, of Youngstown, Ohio. Mrs. Angeline Lester lives at 836 West Federal Street, on U.S. Route #422, in a very dilapidated one story structure, which once was a retail store room with an addition built on the rear at a different floor level. Angeline lives alone and keeps her several cats and chickens in the house with her. She was born on the plantation of Mr. Womble, near Lumpkin, Stewart County, Georgia about 1847, the exact date not known to her, where she lived until she was about four years old. Then her father was sold to a Dr. Sales, near Brooksville, Georgia, and her mother and a sister two years younger were sold to John Grimrs[HW:?], who in turn gave them to his newly married daughter, the bride of Henry Fagen, and was taken to their plantation, near Benevolence, Randolph County, Georgia. When the Civil War broke out, Angeline, her mother and sister were turned over to Robert Smith, who substituted for Henry Fagen, in the Confederate Army. Angeline remembers the soldiers coming to the plantation, but any news about the war was kept from them. After the war a celebration...

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Biographical Sketch of Abbot, Francis Ellingwood

Abbot, Francis Ellingwood, son of Joseph Hale and Fanny (Larcom) Abbot, was born in Boston, November 6, 1836. His early education was obtained at home, and in the Boston public Latin school. Fitting for college, he entered Harvard in 1855, and was graduated with the class of 1859. He spent three years in the Harvard divinity school and Meadville (Pa.) Theological Seminary. It is a fitting tribute to the mother of the subject of this sketch that he has filially attributed his best education to her early training and blessed influence. Mr. Abbot was principal of the Meadville (Pa.) Female Seminary three years ending in June, 1863, while still studying for his profession. He was ordained minister of the Unitarian society in Dover, N. H., August 31, 1864, and resigned April 1, 1868, to become minister of the Independent religious society in the same city. He resigned this position at the end of six months, because, in consequence of a famous lawsuit (set forth at great length in the New Hampshire Reports, Vol. 53), the new society voted not to maintain its own independent position. He served as minister of the Independent society of Toledo, Ohio, from July 1869 to March 1873, and editor of the Toledo (afterward Boston) “Index” from January 1, 1870, to July 1, 1880. He kept a classical school for boys in New York until...

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Biography of Eames Dickey

Eames Dickey was born of Irish parents in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, September 3, 1788, came to the northwestern territory with his father’s family in 1798 and settled first in Washington county. When a young man Mr. Dickey was employed as a post rider to carry the mail on horseback, between Marietta and Chillicothe, a distance of about one hundred miles. Between 18o6 and 1814 he was variously engaged in the mail service, sometimes as a sub contractor, but always doing the riding of one hand himself. At that time the mail service in this section was one of great hardship and frequently of danger, as the numerous streams along the route, all destitute of bridges, were often swollen and had to be crossed at the peril of life. From 1812 to 1814, during the war with Great Britain, the great East and West mail was sent over this route, the bag being sometimes nearly filled with government dispatches alone. The riders (three in number), each made one round trip a week from Marietta to Chillicothe and return, regardless of weather and of all obstacles. Mr. Dickey once swam the creek near Amesville in the night, running great risk and getting the mail thoroughly wet. On reaching John Brown’s in Ames, one of his regular stopping places, he spent a short time drying the mail bag before the fire and then...

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Biography of Chester I. Long

Definite distinction and assured prestige have been gained by Chester I. Long as one of the representative member of the Kansas bar, and his influence in public affairs had been wide and potent, as indicated by the fact that he was elected to the United States Senate from Kansas and had been a recognized leader in the councils of the republican party in the Sunflower State. He is engaged in the practice of his profession in the City of Wichita, had honored Kansas by his character and achievement, and is eminently entitled to recognition in this history. Mr. Long was born on a farm in Perry County, Pennsylvania, on the 12th of October, 1860, and is a son of Abraham G. and Mary Long. His father was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, in 1812, and was a resident of Daviess County, Missouri, at the time of his death, in 1891, the major part of his active career having been marked by close and effective association with the industry of agriculture. His ancestors came from Germany and located in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, in the early part of the eighteenth century. He continued to reside in his native state until 1865, when he removed with his family to Daviess County, Missouri, where he developed the old homestead farm which was his residence until his death. His widow passed the closing period...

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Biographical Sketch of James Albert Brady

Brady, James Albert; insurance; born, Franklin, Pa., Nov. 16, 1880; son of John and Isabelle Kingman Brady; educated, High School, Union City, Pa., graduate; studied Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa., Columbia University, Washington, D. C., and Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Md.; married, Erie, Pa., June 3, 1905, Miriam E. Goodnough; two children, Louise Belle, age 6, and James A. Jr., age 4; came to Cleveland on Dec, 5, 1902, to enter life insurance work for The Mutual Life Insurance Co., in November, 1907, formed a partnership with R. A. Tuttle, the firm to take charge of Northern Ohio for The Midland Mutual Life Insurance Co.; Brady & Tuttle, gen. mgrs. for Northern Ohio for The Midland Mutual Life Insurance Co.; trustee Euclid Avenue Baptist Church; member Phi Kappa Psi National College Fraternity; served as sec’y and pres. of the Cleveland Alumni Assn, in 1903-1904; member Lakewood Tennis...

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Kimble, Lawrence W. – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Lawrence W.Kimble was born at Benton, Pa, June 16, 1871. Died in Enterprise, Sunday, October 6th, 1918. When Lawrence was five years of age his parents and family moved to Springfield, Illinois where they remained seven years, then moving to Minnesota. They returned to the old home in Pennsylvania where they now reside. Lawrence remained in the central west except for two years spent at the old home in Pennsylvania just before coming to the far west. He first moved to Kennewick, Wash., in 1911 and to Enterprise in the fall of 1912 when he became manager of the Enterprise M & M flour mills. He was married January 21, 1893 to Amelia Lehman in Minnesota. His wife and three children, Mrs. Ethel Hamilton, Fern and Clarence Kimble, all of Enterprise, survive him. A brother, C.L. Kimble, lives in Spokane and the aged parents in Benton, Pa. The death of Mr. Kimble was a great shock to his many friends in this city and surrounding country. He had been stricken less than a week. Mr. Kimble was an active member of the M.E. church in this city and a valued member of the I.O.O.F lodge of this city. The funeral was largely attended and the funeral services at the M.E. church were conducted by Rev. Sibley. The Odd Fellows had charge at the cemetery. The...

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Biography of Harry Pray Study, A. B., A. M.

Harry Pray Study, A. B., A. M. Among the learned callings there is none, perhaps, that demands a greater degree of patience, tact, specialized knowledge, judgment and natural executive ability than that of the educator, and the individual who enters into this important field, selecting it as a calling, is called upon to make many personal sacrifices and to give many of the best years of his life unreservedly to its demands, often without the emoluments that would be attached to an equal amount of labor expended in another direction. However, there are many satisfying rewards which come to the successful teacher, and some of the best of these have come to Prof. Harry Pray Study, superintendent of schools of Neodesha, Kansas, and an educator of high talents, broad knowledge and extensive experience. Professor Study was born at Fountain City, Indiana, January 7, 1879, and is a son of William H. and Louisa (Cranor) Study. The family originated in Baden, Baden, Germany, and it is thought that the great-grandfather, who was a homesteader into Indiana, was the original emigrant to America, his first residence being in Maryland. In one of these two states, in 1817, was born Isaac Study, the grandfather of Professor Study. He engaged in farming during the greater part of his life, in Indiana, and died at Williamsburg, that state, in 1861. William H. Study was...

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Biography of John Quincy Smith

John Quincy Smith. The career of J. Quincy Smith, of Fredonia, had been an expression of well directed and diversified industry and in its development had invaded various fields of human activity, in each of which J. Q. Smith had won a full measure of material success and satisfying reputation. He had had experience in both professional and business labors, and while he is now retired from the activities of life, having approached the Psalmist’s three-score-and-ten years, is still an influence for good in his community and a citizen whose help and support continue to be factors for the development of the city’s interests. J. Q. Smith was born at Lebanon, Ohio, September 20, 1848, and is a son of Jacob H. and Martha (Steddom) Smith. Christian Smith, the grandfather of John Quincy Smith, was born in Germany, and was a young man when he decided to try his fortunes in business life in the United States. On coming to this country he located in Pennsylvania, and in that state spent his entire life residing at various places and being engaged in manufacturing operations. He not alone rose to a high position in business circles, but was also widely and favorably known in public matters and at one time was the candidate of the republican party for governor of Pennsylvania, but lost the election owing to political conditions in...

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Bloom, Sedric Cleo, Jr. – Obituary

Cleo, “Junior,” as he was affectionately known, was born February 2, 1925 at LaPlata, Missouri. In the spring of the same year he and his family moved to a ranch south of Valentine, Nebraska. He attended country school and then graduated high school in Meadville, Pennsylvania where he lived with his Aunt Alpha Soupos. Three years later, 1946, he earned his degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Missouri Columbia. He loved music and singing so he attended Julliard School of Music in New York City, studying voice. He continued his studies at the University of Omaha School of Music, and the Denver Conservatory School of Music. He performed for many weddings and funerals. Jr. returned to Nebraska to engage in the ranching and cattle business with his father south of Wood Lake and later north of Ainsworth, Nebraska. Together they developed a premier, Registered Angus breeding herd. In 1956, he married the love of his life, Frances Hans Wells. Together they purchased and successfully operated Stilwell Insurance Agency. Junior sold the agency in the mid 1990s and retired to enjoy his love for golf, shooting, and fishing with his many close friends, who he holds dearly. “Uncle Jr.” was preceded in death by his wife, Frances, and his parents, Cleo and Esther. He is survived by one brother, George Bloom, of Amarillo, Texas and also Mike Bloom...

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Biography of Francis C. Herr M. D.

Francis C. Herr, M. D. One of the most widely known physicians in Franklin County is Dr. Francis C. Herr, who graduated from one of the oldest medical colleges in the country forty years ago, and had been in active practice at Ottawa since 1884. Born at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, December 1, 1852, he is a son of Amos F. and Anna (Frantz) Herr, both of whom are natives of Lancaster County. This is a very old and prominent family of early colonial German ancestry. Doctor Herr is a descendant of Hans Herr, who represented a Suabian family of Germany, where the Herrs had a coat of arms and other insignia of rank. Hans Herr came to Pennsylvania in 1709. He was a man of wealth and acquired 10,000 acres of land near Lancaster, where he spent his years. He established a family which had lived for generations and his descendants have become scattered all over the United States. In these generations are found numerous ministers, physicians, civil engineers, lawyers and many who have reached prominence in the political life of the country. Doctor Herr’s grandfather, Francis Herr, was born in Lancaster County and spent his life there. The father, Amos F. Herr, was born in 1818, was a farmer and stock raiser, from which pursuit he gained wealth, and died in Lancaster County in 1905. He and his wife...

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Biography of Alexander Caldwell

Alexander Caldwell. Among the notable men in the history of Kansas, few are more deserving of perpetuation in its annals than is Alexander Caldwell. From the time when he came to Leavenworth, in the spring of 1861, until his recent retirement from the cares of active life, he was identified with events and movements that made Kansas history in numerous and diversified directions. A pioneer in the work of transporting military supplies to the army posts west of the Missouri River, with the coming of the railroads he turned his attention to railroad construction and management; as a manufacturer he became one of the prominent figures in Fort Leavenworth’s industrial life; as a financier he was the directing head of what became one of the leading financial institutions of the state; and in public life he held positions of high honor and trust. He was the father of the Soldiers’ Home at Leavenworth, and was also instrumental in the securing of an appropriation for the establishment of the United States Military Prison (now the Federal Penitentiary) at this point. His entire career had been one which had reflected honor and credit upon his splendid abilities, his absolute integrity and his devotion to high ideals of citizenship. Alexander Caldwell comes of notable ancestry. Born in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, March 1, 1830, he is a son of James Caldwell and a...

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Biography of John Wilson

John Wilson. Indelibly interwoven with the early and later history of Leavenworth and one of the great industrial captains of his day, was the late John Wilson, one of the solid men of this city for many years. His life story is interesting from every point of view, not alone because of the great business enterprises he fostered and founded, but also for achievements in other fields where his personality counted and where the life he lived so closely touched others that his memory will long be kept green. Mr. Wilson became a permanent resident and property owner in 1857 and for very nearly fifty years was identified with the progress and development of Leavenworth. John Wilson was born at Oxford, Chester County, Pennsylvania, October 9, 1828. His parents, James and Rebecca (Whiteside) Wilson, were of Scotch-Irish descent. The father was a man of considerable consequence in Chester County, serving for twenty-five years as a magistrate and was an elder in the Presbyterian Church. He served as a sergeant in the company of Captain Holmes in the War of 1812. He and his wife were intelligent practical people and their son John profited by their openmindedness for he was given educational advantages such as many youths of the time and neighborhood did not enjoy. After attending the common schools he was employed for a time as a clerk in...

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Biography of John K. Forney

John K. Forney. Dairying is more and more looked upon as one of the most important means of elevating the general agricultural industry of the country. One of the pioneers in stimulating dairying as a farm resource in Western Kansas is Mr. John K. Forney of Abilene, president of the Belle Springs Creamery Company. This is the largest creamery company in Kansas owned exclusively by Kansas capital. Like many other great business enterprises it had been developed from small beginnings. Mr. Forney was at the beginning. He arrived in Kansas with limited capital in 1879, and bought a tract of raw land in Dickinson County, twelve miles southeast of Abilene. There he set up as a farmer and tilled his acres and was largely concerned with his individual home making and prosperity until 1886. In that year he with others organized the Belle Springs Creamery Company. It was then an entirely local concern. It took its name from its location at the old Belle Springs community. Mr. Forney had been president of this company since 1902. The company now operates large plants at Abilene, Salina and Emporia, the headquarters being at Abilene. Abilene is also the center of the immense butter manufacturing plant, where 2,500,000 pounds of butter are made every year. The company also handles other farm produce, especially poultry and eggs, and ships annually 200 carloads. At...

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