Location: Johnstown Pennsylvania

Johnstown and Its Industries

At this point of our narrative a sketch of Johnstown, where the most frightful havoc of the flood occurred, will interest the reader. The following description and history of the Cambria Iron Company’s Works, at Johnstown, is taken from a report prepared by the State Bureau of Industrial Statistics: The great works operated by the Cambria Iron Company originated in a few widely separated charcoal furnaces, which were built by pioneer iron workers in the early years of this century. It was chartered under the general law authorizing the incorporation of iron manufacturing companies, in the year 1852. The...

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Burial of the Victims

Hundreds have been laid away in shallow trenches without forms, ceremonies or mourners. All day long the work of burial has been going on. There was no time for religious ceremonies or mourning and many a mangled form was coffined with no sign of mourning save the honest sympathy of the brave men who handled them. As fast as the wagons that are gathering up the corpses along the stream arrive with their ghastly loads they are emptied and return again to the banks of the merciless Conemaugh to find other victims among the driftwood in the underbrush, or...

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Shadows of Despair

Another graphic account of the fearful calamity is furnished by an eye-witness: The dark disaster of the day with its attendant terrors thrilled the world and drew two continents closer together in the bonds of sympathy that bind humanity to man. The midnight terrors of Ashtabula and Chatsworth evoked tears of pity from every fireside in Christendom, but the true story of Johnstown, when all is known, will stand solitary and alone as the acme of man’s affliction by the potent forces to which humanity is ever subject. The menacing clouds still hover darkly over the valley of death,...

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The Awful Work of Death

The record of June 3rd continues as follows: The horror of the situation does not lessen. The latest estimate of the number of dead is an official one by Adjutant General Hastings, and it places the number between 12,000 and 15,000. The uncovering of hundreds of bodies by the recession of the waters has already filled the air with pestilential odors. The worst is feared for the surviving population, who must breathe this poisoned atmosphere. Sharp measures prompted by sheer necessity have resulted in an almost complete subsidence of cowardly efforts to profit by the results of the disaster....

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Multiplication of Terrors

The handsome brick High School Building is damaged to such an extent that it will have to be rebuilt. The water attained the height of the window sills of the second floor. Its upper stories formed a refuge for many persons. All Saturday afternoon two little girls could be seen at the windows frantically calling for aid. They had spent all night and the day in the building, cut off from all aid. Without food and drinking water their condition was lamentable. Late in the evening the children were removed to higher ground and properly cared for. A number...

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The Horror Increases

During the night thirty-three bodies were brought to one house. As yet the relief force is not perfectly organized and bodies are lying around on boards and doors. Within twenty feet of where this was written the dead body of a colored woman lies. Provision has been made by the Relief Committee for the sufferers to send despatches to all parts of the country. The railroad company has a track through to the bridge. The first train arrived about half-past nine o’clock this morning. A man in a frail craft got caught in the rapids at the railroad bridge,...

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Death and Desolation

The terrible situation on the second day after the great disaster only intensifies the horror. As information becomes more full and accurate, it does not abate one tittle of the awful havoc. Rather it adds to it, and gives a thousand-fold terror to the dreadful calamity. Not only do the scenes which are described appear all the more dreadful, as is natural, the nearer they are brought to the imagination, but it seems only too probable that the final reckoning in loss of life and material wealth will prove far more stupendous than has even yet been supposed. The...

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The Appalling News

On the advent of Summer, June 1st, the country was horror-stricken by the announcement that a terrible calamity had overtaken the inhabitants of Johnstown, and the neighboring villages. Instantly the whole land was stirred by the startling news of this great disaster. Its appalling magnitude, its dreadful suddenness, its scenes of terror and agony, the fate of thousands swept to instant death by a flood as frightful as that of the cataract of Niagara, awakened the profoundest horror. No calamity in the history of modern times has so appalled the civilized world. The following graphic pen-picture will give the...

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Biography of Gideon Penrod Marner, M. D.

Gideon Penrod Marner, M. D. This is a name known throughout the length and breadth of Marion County because of Doctor Marner’s long and active career as a physician and surgeon. Doctor. Marner had practiced at Marion for a quarter of a century and most of his experience and work in the profession had been in Kansas. He was born January 4, 1856, at Johnstown, Pennsylvania, a locality famous as the scene of one of the greatest calamities in history, the Johnstown flood of 1889. However, the Marner family had moved from Western Pennsylvania many years before. His parents, Jonathan and Elizabeth (Penrod) Marner, were both born in the same locality. His father was born October 21, 1825, and his mother on September 24, 1835. They were married in 1852. Jonathan Marner was a farmer and carpenter and in 1865 moved with his family to Iowa, where he spent most of his years as a farmer. He died at Iowa City August 14, 1909; and his wife passed away there on June 30, 1905. They were the parents of eleven children, five sons and six daughters. Magdalens, born January 21, 1854, died April 8, 1855; Gideon P.; William, who was born February 7, 1858, and is now practicing medicine at Miles, Iowa; Nancy, born October 3, 1860, died November 11, 1871; Sarah, born April 16, 1863; Isaac, born January...

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Biographical Sketch of Milton Freshwater

Freshwater, Milton; paving contractor; born, West Virginia, Sept. 11, 1877; son of E. A. and Clarenda Campbell Freshwater; educated in commercial course at Morgantown, W. Va.; married, Johnstown, Pa., Dec. 31, 1907, Miss C. B. Williams; two children; has worked at the street-paving business since 1893; completing street paving in the following places; Johnstown and Freeport, Pa., Chester, W. Va., Alliance, Richwood, Ada and Cleveland, Ohio; since April, 1909; the paving contracts are man-aged by three members of the firm, while Mr. E. A. Freshwater takes no part in this branch of the business; the firm consists of E. A. Freshwater, Philip, Elmer and Milton Freshwater, sons of E. A.; the firm has offices in Morgantown, W. Va., and...

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Biographical Sketch of Evan Henry Hopkins

Hopkins, Evan Henry; lawyer; born, Johnstown, Pa., Nov. 4, 1864; son of David J. and Mary Jeffreys Hopkins; A. B., Adelbert College, 1889; LL. B., Harvard, 1892; married, Frances P. M. Shain, of Cleveland, Dec. 27, 1892; admitted to bar, 1891; in practice at Cleveland since 1892; member law firm of Herrick & Hopkins; member faculty and registrar, 1892-1895, dean law dept., 1895-1910, Western Reserve University; member and sec’y Cleveland Public Library Board, 1892-1898; member Board Park Commissioners, Cleveland, 1900-1901; Presbyterian; Republican; contributor to legal publications; member University...

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Biographical Sketch of William Rowland Hopkins

Hopkins, William Rowland; lawyer; born, Johnstown, Pa., July 26, 1869; son of David J. and Mary Jeffreys Hopkins; educated, Western Reserve Academy, 1892, Adelbert College, Western Reserve University, 1896, A. B.; Law School, Western Reserve University, 1897, LL. B.; married Cleveland, June 11, 1903, Ellen Louise Cozad; member City Council, 1897-1899; active in promotion and construction of the Cleveland Short Line B. R., working out a system of rapid transit for Cleveland; director The Cleveland Short Line R. R. Co.; vice pres. and treas. the Belt & Terminal Realty Co.; pres. The Cleveland Underground B. R. Co., the Subway Realty Co., the Junction Realty Co., the Began Realty Co., The Hopkins Holding Co.; director the Deckman-Duty Brick Co.; pres. The Railway Contracting Co.; member American Economic Ass’n, American Political Economic Ass’n; member Delta Upsilon, Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Delta Phi. Fraternities; Mason, K. P.; member University, Willowick, Athletic Clubs, (Cleveland); City Club, New York; Asheville Club, Asheville, N....

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Biographical Sketch of James Arthur Loughry

Loughry, James Arthur; dentist; born, Johnstown, Pa., Nov. 30, 1881; son of Clark Hawkins and Emma Louise Cooper Loughry; educated, Elyria, O., public school, and graduate of High School, 1899; Ohio State University dental education; received degree of D. D. S., 1904; married, Marion, Ind., Dec. 25, 1906, Edith Johnson; one son, James Richard Loughry; member National Dental Ass’n, Ohio State Dental Society, Northern Ohio Dental Ass’n, and Cleveland Dental Society; member Psi Omega Dental Fraternity, and Euclid...

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Biography of James Philip Murray

James Philip Murray. The largest institution of its kind in Kansas City, Kansas, is the Murray Baking Company. As a business it is one of the considerable assets of the community. Its product is known and appreciated by thousands of customers. The business affords employment, and on other grounds could hardly be left out of any list of leading enterprises. The business also had a human interest, since the plant is the outgrowth and product of the technical ability and the energy of one man, James P. Murray. Mr. Murray came to America some thirty-five years ago, poor in worldly goods but with a remarkable vitality and an eagerness and resolution to make something of himself. There is a heightened interest in his success because of the fact that he is a baker by accident rather than by deliberate choice. However, before taking up his experiences and activities in this country something should be said of his birth and family connections. He was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, near the Town of Dungannon, May 16, 1864, youngest of the eleven children of Philip and Margaret (Irwin) Murray. His father was both a farmer and a freighter, and in the days before railroads were built in Ireland he hauled a great amount of freight in wagons. He and his wife spent all their lives in the old country, where he...

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Biography of Robert N. McMillen, M. D.

Robert N. McMillen, M. D. Doctor McMillen began the practice of medicine in Kansas thirty-five years ago, and was among the first physicians in Pratt County. Much of his early practice was among the pioneer homes of that section. For seventeen years his home and offices have been at Iola, and he still carries the burden of a heavy practice at that city. Doctor McMillen represents Scotch ancestry, who came to America many years ago and were pioneers in the State of Kentucky. His grandfather Robert McMillen was a native of Kentucky, was a farmer there, and met his death as a result of accident. Isaac McMillen, the father of Doctor McMillen, was born near Lexington, Kentucky, in 1826. He grew up in that state, and was early attracted into a profession which engaged the services of many men in the early half of the last century just as railroading does today. He became a steamboat captain, piloting boats up and down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers from St. Louis to New Orleans and also from Pittsburg to St. Louis. For a number of years he had his home at Bellaire, Ohio, in Belmont County. He married there, and his death occurred at Bellaire March 23, 1857. The cause of his death was smallpox. In politics he was a democrat. Captain McMillen married Margaret J. Davis, who was born...

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