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Location: Jefferson County OH

Moravian Massacre at Gnadenbrutten

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In the early part of the year 1763 two Moravian missionaries, Post and Heckewelder, established a mission among the Tuscarawa Indians, and in a few years they had three nourishing missionary stations, viz: Shoenbrun, Gnadenbrutten and Salem, which were about five miles apart and fifty miles west of the present town of Steubenville, Ohio. During our Revolutionary War their position being midway between the hostile Indians (allies of the British) on the Sandusky River, and our frontier settlements, and therefore on the direct route of the...

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Philadelphia To Steubenville

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Monday, Oct. 4, 1819.–Dr. Hall and myself left Philadelphia at 1 o’clock p. m. after taking an affectionate leave of friends and acquaintances. Fair and pleasant weather, and the roads very fine in consequence of a refreshing shower of rain which fell on the night previous to our setting out. After traveling twenty-two miles and passing some rich and well-cultivated farms we arrived at West Chester at 7 o’clock. West Chester contains about 600 inhabitants, several places of worship, a gaol, etc., etc. A man named Downey is confined in the gaol of this place for debt. He was once in affluence, but from misfortunes and some imprudence he became reduced in circumstances. During his confinement he determined to starve himself to death, and for seven days had refused nourishment of every description. Even the clergy waited on him and endeavored to dissuade him from his rash determination, offering him food of different kinds, but all without avail. He was able to stand. No doubt one or two more days will end his troubles. How long, O my country, will your cheeks continue to be crimsoned by the blush that must follow the plunging an innocent and unfortunate being, a debtor, in a dungeon, amongst murderers and cut-throats? Tuesday, Oct. 5.–Left West Chester at 7 o’clock...

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Through Ohio And Kentucky

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Sunday, Oct. 18.–Myself and friend proceeded on our journey. We arrived at Siers, a distance of thirty miles, at dusk, much relieved by the change from our horses to the wagon. The roads were muddy, the weather drizzly and the country hilly. Buildings indifferent. The land very fertile and black. Trees uncommonly tall. Passed the little village of Cadis. In this country a tavern, a store, a smith shop and two or three cabins make a town. Passed ten or fifteen travelers. Great contrast between the quality of the land from Chambersburg to Pittsburg, and that which we have already traveled over from Steubenville in Ohio. Monday, Oct. 19.–Left Siers at 6 o’clock a. m. The morning fair and cold. Roads extremely rough. Country fertile, but hilly. Log cabins, ugly women and tall timber. Passed a little flourishing village called Freeport, settled by foreigners. Yankee Quakers and mechanics. Remarkable, with two taverns in the village, there was nothing fit to drink, not even good water. The corn fields in the woods among dead trees and the corn very fine. We arrived at Adairs, a distance of twenty-seven miles, at 6 o’clock p. m. Passed some peddlers and a few travelers. Value of land from Steubenville to Adairs from $2 to $30 per acre. Lots in Freeport,...

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Biographical Sketch of James L. Chapman

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now James L. Chapman is a native of West Virginia, born near Manchester, Hancock County, in the widely quoted “Pan-handle district,” March 23, 1818, and there he was reared, educated, and lived until the 5th of April, 1854. In that year he migrated to the “land of the Hawkeye,” settling in Jefferson county, but remained in that county only till the following fall, then removed to Wayne county, Iowa, and there continued to live and engage in farming until 1864, when he made his home in Missouri, locating in Harrison county. Six years he pursued farming avocations in that county, then removed to Daviess county and settled in Salem township, where he farmed until 1876, and then engaged in the mercantile and hotel business, at Coffeysburg, with his son, William A., under the firm name of Chapman & Son, continuing the business until 1880, when they sold out and came to Gallatin and engaged in the hotel business, for six months, then dissolved partnership. Mr. Chapman then purchased his present fruit farm on the southern limits of Gallatin, where he is engaged in the growing and cultivating of the excellent fruits indigenous to the soil of Daviess county, having made fruit culture a study since early boyhood. He has one hundred and eleven apple trees, two hundred...

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Slave Narrative of George Jackson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Bishop & Isleman Person Interviewed: George Jackson Location: Steubenville, Ohio Place of Birth: Loudon County, Virginia Date of Birth: Feb. 6, 1858 Age: 79 WPA in Ohio Federal Writers’ Project Bishop & Isleman Reporter: Bishop [HW: Revised] Topic: Ex-Slaves. Jefferson County, District #5 July 6, 1937 GEORGE JACKSON Ex-Slave, 79 years I was born in Loudon County, Virginny, Feb. 6, 1858. My mother’s name was Betsy Jackson. My father’s name was Henry Jackson. Dey were slaves and was born right der in Loudon County. I had 16 brothers and sisters. All of dem is dead. My brothers were Henry, Richard, Wesley, John and me; Sisters were Annie, Marion, Sarah Jane, Elizabeth, Alice, Cecila and Meryl. Der were three other chillun dat died when babies. I can remember Henry pullin’ me out of de fire. I’ve got scars on my leg yet. He was sold out of de family to a man dat was Wesley McGuest. Afterwards my brother was taken sick with small-pox and died. We lived on a big plantation right close to Bloomfield, Virginny. I was born in de storeroom close to massa’s home. It was called de weavin’ room-place where dey weaved cotton and yarn. My bed was like a little cradle bed and dey push it under de big bed at...

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Slave Narrative of Catherine Slim

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Bishop & Isleman Person Interviewed: Catherine Slim Location: Steubenville, Ohio Place of Birth: Rockingham, Virginia Age: 87 Place of Residence: 939 N. 6th St., Steubenville, Ohio WPA in Ohio Federal Writers’ Project Bishop & Isleman Jun 9, 1937 Topic: Ex-Slaves Jefferson County, District #2 MRS. CATHERINE SLIM Ex-slave, 87 years, 939 N. 6th St., Steubenville I wuz born in Rockingham, Virginny; a beautiful place where I cum from. My age is en de courthouse, Harrisonburg, Virginny. I dunno de date of my birth, our massa’s wouldn’t tell us our age. My mother’s name wuz Sally. She wuz a colored woman and she died when I wuz a little infant. I don’t remember her. She had four chillun by my father who wuz a white man. His name wuz Jack Rose. He made caskets for de dead people. My mother had six chillun altogether. De name of de four by my father wuz, Frances de oldest sister, Sarah wuz next, den Mary. I am de baby, all three are dead cept me. I am very last one livin’. I had two half-brudders, dey were slaves too, John and Berwin. Berwin wuz drowned in W. Va. He wuz bound out to Hamsburger and drowned just after he got free. Dey did not sold infant slaves. Den dey...

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Slave Narrative of John W. Matheus

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Bishop & Isleman Person Interviewed: John Williams Matheus Location: Steubenville, Ohio Age: 77 Place of Residence: 203 Dock Street WPA in Ohio Federal Writers’ Project Bishop & Isleman Reporter: Bishop (Revision) July 8, 1937 Topic: Ex-Slaves Jefferson County, District #5 JOHN WILLIAMS MATHEUS Ex-Slave, 77 years “My mothers name was Martha. She died when I was eleven months old. My mother was owned by Racer Blue and his wife Scotty. When I was bout eleven or twelve they put me out with Michael Blue and his wife Mary. Michael Blue was a brother to Racer Blue. Racer Blue died when I was three or four. I have a faint rememberance of him dying suddenly one night and see him laying out. He was the first dead person I saw and it seemed funny to me to see him laying there so stiff and still.” “I remember the Yankee Soldier, a string of them on horses, coming through Springfield, W. Va. It was like a circus parade. What made me remember that, was a colored man standing near me who had a new hat on his head. A soldier came by and saw the hat and he took it off the colored man’s head, and put his old dirty one on the colored man’s head and...

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Slave Narrative of Thomas McMillan

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Bishop & Isleman Person Interviewed: Thomas McMillan Location: Steubenville, Ohio Place of Birth: Monroe County, Alabama Place of Residence: 909 Morris Ave., Steubenville, Ohio WPA in Ohio Federal Writers’ Project Bishop & Isleman Reporter: Bishop July 7, 1937 Topic: Ex-Slaves. Jefferson County, District #5 [HW: Steubenville] THOMAS McMILLAN, Ex-Slave (Does not know age) I was borned in Monroe County, Alabam. I do not know de date. My father’s name was Dave McMillan and my mothers name was Minda. Dey cum from Old Virginny and he was sold from der. We lived in a log house. De beds hed ropes instead of slats and de chillun slept on de floor. Dey put us out in de garden to pick out weeds from de potatoes. We did not get any money. We eat bread, syrup and potatoes. It wuz cooked in pots and some was made in fire, like ash cakes. We hed possum lots of times and rabbit and squirrel. When dey go fishin’ we hed fish to eat. I liked most anything they gave us to eat. In de summer we wore white shirt and pants and de same in de winter. We wore brogans in de winter too. De Massa name wuz John and his wife died before I know her. He hed a...

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Slave Narrative of Perry Sid Jemison

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Bishop & Taleman Person Interviewed: Perry Sid Jemison Location: Steubenville, Ohio Place of Birth: Perry County, Alabama Age: 79 Place of Residence: 422 South Sixth Street, Steubenville, Ohio WPA in Ohio Federal Writers’ Project Written by Bishop & Isleman Edited by Albert I. Dugen [TR: also reported as Dugan] Ex-Slaves Jefferson County, District #2 PERRY SID JEMISON [TR: also reported as Jamison] Ex-Slave, 79 years (Perry Sid Jemison lives with his married daughter and some of his grand-children at 422 South Sixth Street, Steubenville, O.) “I wuz borned in Perry County, Alabama! De way I remember my age is, I was 37 years when I wuz married and dat wuz 42 years ago the 12th day of last May. I hed all dis down on papers, but I hab been stayin’ in different places de last six years and lost my papers and some heavy insurance in jumpin’ round from place to place. “My mudders name wuz Jane Perry. Father’s name wuz Sid Jemison. Father died and William Perry was mudders second husband. “My mudder wuz a Virginian and my father was a South Carolinian. My oldest brodder was named Sebron and oldest sister wuz Maggie. Den de next brudder wuz William, de next sister wuz named Artie, next Susie. Dats all of dem. “De...

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Biography of John Porter

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John Porter. This is the name of one of the old pioneers of Kansas territory. It was fifty-seven years ago when he established his first home within the limits of the presant Shawnee County and there began working out his own destiny and to some extent the destiny of Kansas as a free state and the welfare of his children. It is a name that will always be spoken with respect, and those who bear it in the future will have reason to congratulate themselves in the splendid character of their pioncor Kansas ancostor, John Portor. He was a native of England, born July 11, 1822, and was the only member of his immediate family to come to America. His early life was spent on a farm and his education was limited. Soon after his marriage in England to Mary Ann Lunn he started for the United States. It was his belief that the better economic conditions of America would enable him to find a home for himself, and in later years that ambition was well renlized. A sailing vessel brought him and his young wife across the ocean, and they were six weeks two days in making the passage. Their first home in Amerles was at Monroeville, Ohio. Soon after their arrival their first child,...

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Biographical Sketch of Dan Freeman Bradley

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Bradley, Dan Freeman; clergyman; born, Bangkok, Siam, March 17, 1857; son of Dan Beach and Sarah (Blachly) Bradley; educated, Oberlin College, 1882, Oberlin Theological Seminary, 1885, Oberlin Honorary Degree Doctor of Divinity, 1909; same degree, Cornell College, 1904; married, Oberlin, O., July 9, 1883, Lillian Jaques; three sons, Dwight J., Robert G., and Theodore Bradley; pastor Steubenville Ohio, Congregational Church, 1885-1887; Yankton, S. D., 1887-1892; Grand Rapids, Mich., 1892-1902; pres. Iowa College, Grinnel, Ia., 1902-1905; pastor Pilgrim Church, Cleveland, 1905 to date; has gymnasium, branch of public library cooking school and mothers club; has been instrumental in the organization of the above; member Congregational National Council, Congregational Conference of Ohio, Congregational Union, Cleveland, Federated Churches, Cleveland, trustee Oberlin College, Schauffler School, Cleveland, Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga.; member Chamber of Commerce, Congregational Club, Cleveland. Recreations: Base-ball, Rowing and...

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Biography of Oliver Denious

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Oliver Denious, a resident of Erie, Kansas, since 1894, has lived a life full of activity. His experiences have been in the role of a farm laborer, soldier, farmer, business man, public official, and wherever and in whatever place destiny has put him he has given a good account of his ability and character. He was only twelve years of age when he became self supporting. That was back in Stark County, Ohio. His first work was to hire out to neighboring farmers, and though extremely young, he often did a man’s work. Naturally enough he had limited advantages to obtain an education, and the public schools he attended were in Stark County. After four years working for others he returned to his father’s place and put in one year after the age of sixteen on the old homestead. His birth occurred at Greensburg, Summit County, Ohio, July 8, 1844. Although the Denious family came from Germany to Pennsylvania in early days, their ancestry was principally Scotch. Judge Denious’ grandfather was Michael Denious, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1790 and became a pioneer settler in Summit County, Ohio. He was both a farmer and blacksmith. He saw some active service as a soldier during the War of 1812, and his death occurred at Greentown, Ohio,...

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Biographical Sketch of Albert William Johnston

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Johnston, Albert William; railroad office; born, Boston, Mass., March 4, 1853; son of Thomas Hunter and Anne Metcalf Johnston; educated, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; married, Steubenville, O., Sept. 17, 1880, Flora P. Kimball; one daughter, Pauline Kimball Johnston; entered the railroad business in 1875; has resided in Cleveland since 1884, as Division Engineer, N. Y. C. & St. L. R. R. Co., and has successfully held positions of division supt. Eastern Division, general supt. and gen. mgr. entire line; member American Society of Civil Engineers, American Rotary Association and American Rotary Guild; member College Fraternity, Chi Phi Tau, Boston, 1873; member Union Club. Recreations: Fishing and Sailing on the Maine Cost in...

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Biography of Hiram W. Lewis, Col.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Col. Hiram W. Lewis. In many important ways the city of Wichita expresses the life, ideals, and activities of the late Col. Hiram W. Lewis. In his time he was undoubtedly one of the most forceful figures and one of the ablest business men and citizens in the State of Kansas. When he came to Wichita about 1875 he had already acquitted himself with credit both as a soldier in the Civil war and as a business man. Born near Warren, Ohio, he lived in Ohio during his youth and on May 25, 1863, enlisted in Company E of the One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Ohio Infantry. He went out as a private, becoming corporal, and was in many of the important battles of the great campaigns by which the states of Tennessee and Georgia were wrested from the Confederacy. He was wounded in the arm at Chickamauga. After his honorable discharge on May 15, 1865, he identified himself with the South and bought a plantation near Columbus, Mississippi. He remained on that plantation for ten years, and also took a very active part in public affairs. He served as sheriff of his county, and for several years represented his district in the State Legislature. Colonel Lewis during his residence in Wichita was primarily a banker. When...

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Biographical Sketch of Carleton Lewis Terry

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Terry, Carleton Lewis; coal business; born near Adrian, Mich., Aug. 23, 1872; son of James E. and Mary T. Maynard Terry; married, Steubenville, O., March 9, 1895, Alma Dell King; issue, one son, James Edwin, second, and one daughter, Katheryn Lois; entered the service of the Iowa Central R. R., and The Wheeling & Lake Erie R. R., at Pittsburgh, Pa., in 1891; came to Cleveland in July, 1893, and entered the Freight Traffic Dept. of The Cleveland, Lorain & Wheeling R. R., remaining until Jan. 1, 1901, when he was elected sec’y of The Allegheny Coal Co.; director The Commonwealth Steamship Co.; affiliated with the Masonic Order, being raised in Iris Lodge; member Chamber of...

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