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Location: Jefferson County LA

Biographical Sketch of Eugene Fuller

Of EUGENE FULLER, the second child of Timothy Fuller and Margaret Crane, the following notice taken from the annual obituary college record, by Joseph Palmer, M.D., published by the “Boston Daily Advertiser,” gives some account: – “Eugene Fuller, the eldest son of Hon. Timothy and Margaret (Crane) Fuller, was born in Cambridge, Mass., May 14, 1815. After leaving college in 1834, he studied law, partly at the Dane Law School in Cambridge, and partly in the office of George Frederick Farley, Esq., of Groton, Mass. After his admission to the bar, he practiced his profession two years in Charlestown, Mass. He afterwards went to New Orleans, and was connected with the public press of that city. He spent several summers there, and, some two or three years ago was affected by sun-stroke, which resulted in softening of the brain, and ultimately in a brain fever, which came very near proving fatal, and left him in a shattered condition. His friends hoping that medical treatment at the north might benefit him, he embarked, with an attendant, on board the Empire City for New York. When one day out, June 21, 1859, his attendant being prostrated with seasickness, Mr. Fuller was left alone, and was not afterwards seen. He must have been lost...

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Biographical Sketch of Aldrich, Thomas Bailey

Aldrich, Thomas Bailey, son of Elias T. and Sara (Bailey) Aldrich, was born in Portsmouth, Rockingham County, N. H., November 11, 1836. He received his early education at the common schools in New Orleans, La., and at the Temple grammar school in Portsmouth. He commenced a course of study preparatory to entering college, but having the misfortune, in his fifteenth year, to lose his father, he abandoned that purpose, and entered the counting-room of an uncle, a merchant in New York. Her he remained for three years, and it was during that period that he began to contribute verses to the New York journals. A collection of his poems was published in 1855, the volume taking its name from the initial poem, “The Bells.” Mr. Aldrich’s most successful poem, “Babie Bell,” which was published in 1856, was copied and repeated all over the country. His next position was that of proofreader, and then reader for a publishing house. He became a frequent contributor to the New York “Evening Mirror,” “Putnam’s Magazine,” “The Knickerbocker,” and the weekly newspapers, for one of which he wrote “Daisy’s Necklace and What Came of It,” a prose poem which was afterwards issued in a volume, and attained a wide popularity. In 1856 Mr. Aldrich joined the staff of the “Home Journal,” continuing in this position for three years. He was also connected with the...

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Biography of Jonathan Wilkins

Jonathan Wilkins, one of the earliest inhabitants of Athens, was a man of very considerable learning, and for some time taught a pioneer school. Of his son, Timothy Wilkins, the following reminiscence is furnished by Dr. C. F. Perkins; it is hardly less strange than the history immortalized by Tennyson in 11 Enoch Arden.” Mr. Wilkins was skillful and enterprising in business, but, through no fault of his own, became embarrassed, was hard pressed by creditors, and pursued by writs. In those days, when a man could be imprisoned for a debt of ten dollars, to fail in business was an awful thing. Wilkins was not dishonest, but had a heart to pay if he could. He battled bravely with his misfortunes for a considerable period, but with poor success. One day in the year 1829, full of despair, he came from his home west of town, across the Hockhocking, and having transacted some business with the county clerk, went out, and was supposed to have returned home. The next morning it became known that he was not at his house. Inquiry and search being made, the boat in which he usually crossed the river was seen floating bottom upward, and his hat was also found swimming down the stream. Mr. Wilkins was a popular man in the community; news of his loss soon spread, the people gathered from...

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Biographical Sketch of H. Clay Lewis

Mr. H. Clay Lewis, one of the enterprising young farmers of Lake County, is the son, of Robert A. and Mary (Donaldson) Lewis and was born in Lake County, January 5, 1860. Mr. Lewis was raised on a farm, and when a boy had few school advantages. When seventeen years of age he went to New Orleans and entered Dolbear’s Commercial College, but the death of his father prevented him from completing his course, as he then returned to Lake County and assumed charge of his father’s farm. On December 25, 1884, he married Miss Maggie H. Harper, daughter of William Harper. Mrs. Lewis was born February 27, 1861. They have one son, Robert W. They do not belong, to any church. Mr. Lewis is a Mason and in politics a democrat. Although so young a man, by his own industry and fine business ability he has been able to buy a fine farm of 337 acres, in the best part of Lake County. He is a shipping agent at Upper Slews Landing. Mr. Lewis is a wide awake farmer, and a good citizen and an honest...

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Biographical Sketch of Robert A. Lewis

Robert A. Lewis (deceased) was a prominent farmer of Lake County, and was born in 1833, in Fulton County, Kentucky; his father was Major R. N. Lewis. Our subject had good educational advantages. In 1855 he married Mary Donaldson, who was born January 24, 1834 in New Madrid County, Missouri at Donaldson’s Point. She is the daughter of Andrew J. and Kate (Baird) Donaldson. Her father was born at Athens, Alabama, but was raised at Nashville, Tennessee, her mother at Chattanooga. Soon after they married they went to Missouri and remained until 1844 when they came to Lake County. Mr. Donaldson was a democrat and a farmer and died in 1845; his wife was a Methodist and died in 1866. To Mr. and Mrs. Lewis were born nine children, four boys and five girls, only three living: Henry C., Charles A. and Zaida. Mrs. Lewis was a Methodist. In 1861 he volunteered with the Madrid Bend Guards as second lieutenant and was soon promoted to first lieutenant, holding that position until the close of the war. After the war he gave his time to farming. In 1877 he moved his family to New Orleans, and then to Florida and in a short time they returned to Lake County. In 1880 Mr. Lewis lost his life in a painful accident. While turning down the wick in his lamp it exploded...

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Biography of Hiram C. Whitley

Hiram C. Whitley. The State of Kansas is filled with interesting men, many of them known to the world at large. The city of Emporia had several. One is a prominent business man, who for upwards of forty years had given his time and energies to the upbuilding of that locality. This is Hiram C. Whitley who was at one time chief of the secret service division of the United States Treasury. The story of his life, particularly the early years, reads like a book, and in fact his experiences have been described in a book which was published about twenty years ago and which throws an interesting light on life and times in the far South during the Civil war period and also that era known as the reconstruction period for ten years following the great Civil war. Mr. Whitley wrote this book under the title “In It” and it is somewhat in the nature of an autobiography, told simply and modestly, but illuminating that historic epoch in our nation’s history with which it deals. The author says: “The incidents related in this book are founded principally on facts, as they came to me during an experience of twelve years in the Secret Service of the United States Government.” Hiram C. Whitley is a native of the Pine Tree State, but his experiences have covered a larger part...

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Biography of Peter Taschetta

Peter Taschetta. One of the early permanent settlers of Leavenworth was Peter Taschetta, a native of Switzerland, born in Canton, January 6, 1822. He was of Italian ancestry, but long before his birth his people, living on the border between Italy and Switzerland, had property in the former country and his parents became Swiss subjects by purchase. The father was interested in stained glass manufacturing and, as a contractor, traveled extensively, particularly in France, overseeing the placing of stained glass in cathedrals and other structures, some of these being rare examples of artistic coloring. He employed a large number of men to do the work and, as his son Peter grew to years of responsibility, he became timekeeper and also financial agent for his father. In such capacity he visited different countries, necessarily learning their language and before he came to America not only spoke four languages fluently, but also wrote them. Peter Taschetta continued this life of constant travel in Europe until he was twenty-seven years old, it possibly having its influence in leading him to consider visiting America, a far-distant land in those days of slow-sailing vessels. In 1849 he landed at New Orleans, Louisiana, and from there journeyed up the Mississippi to St. Louis. In that city he engaged in mercantile pursuits for a time, but had not yet had the spirit of wanderlust been extinguished,...

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Biography of James G. Sandidge

James G. Sandidge. In the colonial history of the United States may be found frequent mention of names that are familiar and even distinguished at present throughout the great Middle West. They ring with achievement as in the old days, and although generations have passed since their first bearers lived and labored and increased on American soil, the stock is the same and the vigor of the younger branches gives testimony to the strength of the parent root. A long line of notable men have borne the name of Sandidge, from the founding of Jamestown, Virginia, and the early settlement of Charleston, South Carolina. A well known representative of this old and prominent family is found in Dr. James G. Sandidge, surgeon, banker and capitalist, who for almost a quarter of a century has been a foremost citizen of Mulberry, Kansas. James G. Sandidge was born November 12, 1870, in the City of New Orleans, Louisiana. His parents were James G. and Susan K. (Wilson) Sandidge, the former of whom was born at New Orleans in 1840 and is the only surviving child of his parents, Hon. John M. and Mary E. (Gilmer) Sandidge. The grandfather of Doctor Sandidge was born in 1819, in Alabama, and died at New Orleans in 1908. He was reared in Alabama and did not remove to Louisiana until after his marriage. In early...

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Biographical Sketch of Galland, S., Dr.

Dr. S. Galland, physician and surgeon, came to North Topeka, Kan. In 1870, and practiced medicine a year; thence to Kansas City, Mo., and practiced his profession two years, when he moved to Dodge City, Kan., and permanently located, where he has been engaged in the practice of medicine until 1878, since which time he has retired from active business. He was born in Posen, Prussia, Germany, May 11, 1822, and was educated in his native country. He graduated from the old school of medicine at Berlin, in the class of 1847. Practiced in Germany two years, when, in 1849, he came to America, locating in New York City, in his profession until 1851; thence went to California and followed his profession until 1857. He then went to St. Louis, Mo., practicing his profession there and at New Orleans, La., until 1868, when he located in Kansas City, Mo., until he came to Kansas. He ran a hotel about six years in Dodge City. Was married October 13, 1858, to Miss Bertha Leon, born in Cassal High, Germany, December 12, 1825. He has served as Township Treasurer, City Alderman, etc. He is a member of the Masonic order, including the ten first degrees of...

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Biography of Jacob Kamm

No history of navigation upon the Willamette or Columbia would be complete without reciting the part borne by the subject of this sketch. From the time the demands of travel and commerce created business of any magnitude in this direction, down to the present time, he has been more or less prominently connected with this interest, and especially important was the part he bore in the incipient stages of its development. He was born in Switzerland, December 12, 1823. At the age of eight, with his father, who had resigned his commission as captain in the Swiss army, he came to America. They removed to Illinois, where for a year his father was employed in farming and milling. From there they went to St. Louis, where his father conducted a hotel for some years, after which they removed to New Orleans. Here, at the age of twelve, young Kamm commenced the earnest side of life in a printing office, where he was employed until after the death of his father during the fearful yellow fever epidemic in the summer of 1837. In the fall of that year with only a few dollars in his pocket, he started for St. Louis. Upon his arrival he secured a position as a cabin boy on a small steamer called the Ark. In the engineer of this steamer he found a kind friend,...

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Biographical Sketch of James Brown

Jim Brown purchased land in Section 25 of Battle Township, Ida County, Iowa, on October 10, 1873. On March 29, 1874, he came back to live on the farm. James Brown was born in Perry County, Ohio, January 16, 1843. He was from a family of 13 children, nine sons and 4 daughters. His father was John Brown and he was born in 1800 in Waterford County, Ireland, and at the age of 15 came to the United States, landing at New Orleans. He worked for 7 years in the Carolinas and Georgia, and then located in Perry County, Ohio, where he married Mary Clark who came here to the United States from Ireland when a little girl. He came to Jackson County, Iowa, and settled on what was then the frontier. John passed away in 1862. Jim Brown learned his school lessons in a little log schoolhouse in Jackson County. At the age of 25 he married Margaret, settled on a farm in that county and farmed there until 1874. Then he came to Ida County and settled on wild land. He plowed the first furrow ever broken in the western part of the county in Battle Township. Wolves and deer were plenty all around. There was not a house between his farm and Judge John H. Moorehead’s land at the grove of trees where Moorehead had built...

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