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Location: Ireland

Biographical Sketch of Michael Sheehan

Few police officers in California can boast of the record of Michael Sheehan, sheriff of San Mateo county. A list of the important captures made by Sheriff Sheehan in the sixteen years he has been a peace officer, would include some of the most desperate men who are in the State Prisons today serving for daring crimes not only committed in this county but in every county of the state. Sheriff Sheehan was constable of the Second Township for twelve years and refused to again become a candidate although urged by the residents to enter the race for Sheriff. In these years the Second Township was the terror of criminals who seldom stepped over the border before they were apprehended by this alert constable. As sheriff, Mr. Sheehan has built up one of the strongest organizations in that office in the history of the county. He has secured a cooperation between the constables, the police departments of the different municipalities and the Sheriff’s office that has been the dream of all sheriffs. Perhaps Sheriff Sheehan’s greatest service for the county has been as a probation officer. He handled probation matters for eight years so efficiently that he was again appointed after being elected sheriff; but the press of his duties forced him to resign. Michael Sheehan was born in Ireland on February 2, 1861. Of the thirty-two years he...

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Biographical Sketch of James McCormick

The business enterprises of the little city of Pescadero are largely represented by the interests of James McCormick, who though not a native Californian, has thrown himself heartily into the upbuilding. .of his adopted land, which owes much to his earnest efforts. He was born in Ireland in 1841, the son of Peter and Catherine (Gibeny) McCormick. His parents emigrated when he was seven years of age, settling in Cathage, Jefferson County, N. Y.. In 1863, James McCormick left home, for San Francisco, and arrived in that city January 15, 1864. After about nine months in Santa Cruz, he came to Pescadero where he has resided since. In 1873 he started his mercantile business which is now the leading store in his district. In the milling business he also has timber interests and owns valuable timber lands. James McCormick is one of the most prominent figures in the public life of the county. He has served as road supervisor, deputy assessor, and later was a member of the San Mateo County Exposition Commission. In politics Mr. McCormick is a Democrat. Mr. McCormick was married in 1866 to Miss Julia S. Shaffrey, and the children born to them are Alice A., Francis, Ella M., Florence, James, Lillian E., and...

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Biographical Sketch of John McGinnis

John McGinnis and his wife came from Ireland, and settled first in Virginia, from whence they removed to Kentucky. Their son, Greenberry D., married Sallie Lewis, of Kentucky, and settled in Lincoln Co., Mo., in 1832. His children were Elizabeth, Margaret B., William B., Jane, Nancy, Thomas S., Maria, Milton, Sarah E., and Mary E. Milton married Margaret Williams, and settled in Pike County. Elizabeth married Enoch Sevier, and lives in Lincoln County. William B. married twice and settled in Illinois. Jane and Nancy died single. Sarah E. married John Harris, and settled in Illinois. Samuel, son of John McGinnis, Sr., was married twice, and by his first wife he had John, Dora, Samuel, Jr., Polly, and Elizabeth. He was married the second time to Mrs. Mary McGinnis, by whom he had, Erasmus T., William, and Jesse G. Erasmus was married first to Miss Stewart, and second to Fanny Berger. He lives in Montgomery County. William also married a Miss Stewart, and lived and died in Montgomery...

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Biographical Sketch of John McGhee

John McGhee, a native of Ireland, married Margaret Adams, who was born in England. They settled in Shelby County, Ky., where they had Lynch, Emily, Margaret, James, Washington, Nancy, and Rice. Lynch was a physician. Re-married Margaret Shackelford, and settled in Louisville, Ky., but removed to St. Louis, Mo., in 1838. Washington married Julia Sibley, of Kentucky, and died in 1828, leaving a widow and four children Mary H., Robert L., Harriet, and Epsey. Mrs. MeGhee and her children settled in Montgomery County, Mo., in 1841, and she is still living, in her 76th...

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Biography of Thomas Sharp

Thomas Sharp was a native of Ireland, but emigrated to America, and settled first in Pennsylvania, from whence he removed to Washington Co., Va. He was married twice, and by his first wife he had John, Thomas, Jr., and Benjamin. By his second wife he had but one child, David, who became a Methodist minister, and lived and died in Virginia. Thomas, Jr., settled in Kentucky. Benjamin was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and was in Colonel Campbell’s command at the battle of King’s Mountain. He married Hannah Fulkerson, of Virginia, and their children were James F.. John D., Polly C., Jacob L., Catharine E., Attosa P., Hannah D., Peter L , Elvira E., Malinda M., Margaret J., and Benjamin F. In 1816 Mr. Sharp removed to Missouri with all his family except John and Malinda, and settled in (now) Warren County, three miles east of Pinckney. When Montgomery County was organized in 1818, he was appointed Clerk of the County and Circuit Courts and held the position until the State was admitted into the Union. A small log cabin was built in his yard and used as a court house, until the County seat was located at Pinckney, which was named for his daughter, Atossa Pinckney Sharp. Mr. Sharp died at the old Roinstead in 1843; his wife died two years previous. Their son James married Catharine...

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Biographical Sketch of James Glenn

James Glenn and his wife, Sarah Grigg, with their two children, James and Nellie, came from Ireland to America, and settled in Virginia. After their settlement there the following children were born Polly, William, Thomas, and Whitehill. Mr. Glenn and his three sons, William, Thomas, and Whitehill, moved to Ohio; the rest of the children married and settled in Kentucky. James, William, and Thomas were in the war of 1812, and the former was killed at the battle of New Orleans. The other two were with the armies that operated in Canada and the northern part of the United States. After the war Thomas married Lucinda T. Kendall, of Kentucky, and came to Missouri in 1815. He came in a wagon, which contained, in addition to his family and furniture, a set of wheel-wright’s tools, a gun and a dog. Mr. Glenn settled first on Cuivre River, but made about twenty settlements in all before he could find a location to suit him. These were all within the present limits of Montgomery County. He was a great hunter, and during the first year of his residence in Missouri killed fifty-six deer, one elk, and one bear. The names of his children were Julia A , Emily H., Sarah E., James M., and William...

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Biography of David Knox

David Knox was born in Ireland, in 1700. He had a son named Andrew, who was born in 1728. In 1732 Mr. Knox came to America, bringing his little son with him, and settled in Philadelphia County, Pa. Andrew married Isabella White, of Pennsylvania, and they had-Robert, David, Martha, James, John, William, Mary, and Andrew, Jr. Mr. Knox was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and having taken an active part in the events of the day, a reward was offered for him, dead or alive, by the British authorities. On the night of the 14th of February, 1778, he was at home visiting his family, and during the night his house was surrounded by a party of Tories, who had come to capture him for the reward. They announced their presence by firing a volley of balls through the door, and then broke it down with the breeches of their guns. But before they could affect an entrance, Mr. Knox and his son Robert met them with drawn sabers, and laid about them so vigorously that they were soon glad to retreat, with several of their party bleeding from the gashes and cuts they had received. Some American troops in the vicinity were notified of the attack, and immediately started in pursuit. Several of the wounded were captured, as they could be easily traced by the blood on...

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Biographical Sketch of Joseph McFarland

Joseph McFarland, of Ireland, came to America before the revolution, and settled at Norfolk, Va. He joined the American army when the war broke out, and was killed in battle. He left a widow and one son, Robert, who settled in Madison Co., Ky., where he married Rhoda Quick, and they had Sarah, Joseph, and Rachel. Mr. McFarland’s first wife died, and he subsequently married Eva Farmer, of Virginia, by whom he had-Eleanor, Lucinda, Elizabeth, Permelia, Eliza, and Robert. Joseph McFarland settled in Montgomery County in 1825. He married. Polly Cundiff. Lucinda married James McGarvin, of Montgomery County. Eliza married Jonathan G....

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Biography of Stephen Best

Stephen Best, of Ireland, emigrated to America many years before the revolution, and settled in Pennsylvania. His children were Isaac, Humphrey, Stephen, Jr., and Ebenezer. He also had several daughters, but their names are lost. Ebenezer never married, but he educated sixty children that claimed him for their father. He was one of the celebrated horse racers of Madison Co., Ky., and also indulged in chicken fighting. He once fought ten times with his chickens in one day, and gained seven of the fights, winning $1,000 each. Isaac Best and his wife came to Missouri in 1808, from Garrard Co., Ky. They rode two old horses, on which they also carried their bedding, furniture, cooking utensils, etc. They settled on the bottom in Montgomery County, which has since borne their name. Mr. Best, like his brother, was fond of amusement, and delighted in horse racing. When the Indian war broke out he built a fort on his farm, but had to give it up before peace was declared. The Indians became so troublesome that he was afraid to leave his family in the fort any longer, and conveyed them for greater security to Fort Clemson, on Loutre Island. The following day his fort was captured by the Indians, but they found nothing to reward them for their trouble. The names of Mr. Best’s children were John, Stephen, Isaac, Jr.,...

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Biographical Sketch of Matthew Bushby

Matthew Busby, of Ireland, was a weaver by trade. He came to America and settled first in Delaware, from whence he removed to Bath Co., Ky., at an early date. He had seven sons, one of whom, James, married Nancy Lewis, of Delaware, by whom he had eleven children Isaac, Rolley, John, James, Hiram, Lewis, Granville, Elizabeth, Lucretia, Amanda, and Malinda. Lewis and James settled in Missouri. The former married Eliza McClannahan, of Kentucky, and settled in Missouri in...

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Biography of Hugh Logan

Hugh Logan was born in Ireland. At the age of fourteen years he had a difficulty with his father, and ran away from home and went to sea. He followed the life of a sailor for three years, and then landed at Philadelphia, and made his way from there to Kentucky, during the first settlement of that State. He married Rebecca Bryan, a sister of Jonathan, David and Henry Bryan, who had been raised by her aunt, Mrs. Daniel Boone; her mother having died while she was young. Their children were William, Alexander, Hugh, Jr., Henry (called “Boss”) and Mary A. Mr. Logan was drowned in Fleming’s creek, Ky., while attempting to swim a race horse across the stream, and his body was not found until twenty-four hours afterward. The night before his death he had a singular premonition of his approaching fate, in a dream, in which the catastrophe of the following day was clearly depicted. He related the dream to his wife, who tried to persuade him not to go near the creek that day; but he laughed at her for being scared at a dream, and met his death as above stated. William Logan, the eldest son, married Nancy H. Hobbs, daughter of Joseph Hobbs and Nancy Hughes, and came to Missouri in 1820, with his wife and, one child, on horseback. They had twelve children...

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Isaac Bell, Jr., Family

L203 GILBERT DE CLARE: a Magna Charta Surety; a descendant of KING ALFRED THE GREAT, son of Richard de Clare, a Magna Charta Surety. His descendant, 14 generations removed, was No. L221. L221 LADY CATHERINE AYLMER, a desc. of thirteen (who were of kin to nine of the others) of the twenty-five Barons who were Sureties for the observance of the Magna Charta. Widow of Sir Nicholas Plunket, of Dublin , m. Captain Michael Warren, Warrenstown, County Meath , Ireland (d. 1712). L222 OLIVER WARREN, Lieutenant, R. N., of Warrenstown. L223 NATHANIEL WARREN 1See comment 2868 by Owen Clough for alternative ancestry, of “Neilstown House,” Stillorgan and ” Warren Mount”, Dublin . Member of Parliament; High Sheriff of Dublin , 1773; Alderman, 1775. Captain of the Dublin Volunteers; delegate from the city to the National Conventions held in Dublin , 1779 and 1783. L224 ELEANOR LA TOUCHE WARREN: b. 1776; died New York , 1860; m. Robert Crean of Dublin , d. Madrid , Spain , 1831. L225 Henrietta Agnes Crean: d. Saxony , 1873; m. New York , June 6, 1846 , James Gordon Bennett, founder of The N. Y. Herald newspaper. L226 JEANETTE BENNETT: m. Isaac Bell, Jr., of New York , d. 1889. Issue. Footnotes:   [ + ] 1. ↩ See comment 2868 by Owen Clough for alternative...

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Biography of Rev. Patrick Joseph Kane

Rev. Patrick Joseph Kane, who for a third of a century has been pastor of the Church of Our Holy Redeemer at Webster Groves, is a native of Ireland but during his childhood days was brought by his parents to the United States and became a pupil in the public schools of Bloomington, Illinois, where the family home was established. He afterward attended a local business college and later became a student in the Christian Brothers College at St. Louis. Having determined to enter the priesthood he subsequently pursued his theological studies in St. Mary’s Seminary at Baltimore, Maryland, and there received his ordination on the 22d of December, 1882. Father Kane began his active work as a priest at Hannibal, Missouri, where he was assigned to the duty of assistant, remaining there until the 1st of May following, when he was transferred to St. John’s church in St. Louis, at which he officiated as assistant pastor while the regular pastor was making a tour in Europe. In the fall of 1883 Rev. Fr. Kane was appointed pastor of the church of the Immaculate Conception at St. Mary’s, Missouri, and his three and one-half years’ ministry there was remarkably successful. Under his guidance the work of the church and its various societies was thoroughly organized and during the period of his labors there thirty-five or more new members were...

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Biography of Thomas J. Farris

Thomas J. Farris, fourth vice president of the One Hundred Thousand Dollar Club and agency supervisor with the Missouri State Life Insurance Company at St. Louis, was born in Ireland, June 22, 1886, a son of Michael J. and Katherine (Campbell) Farris, who were also natives of Ireland, in which country they were reared and married. In 1894 they came to the United States, settling in Iron county, Missouri, where the father, who was a stonecutter by trade, worked in the quarries at Graniteville. About 1910 he removed to St. Louis, where his death occurred in 1916. His widow survives and now resides at No. 5025 Raymond avenue. Thomas J. Farris was educated in the parochial school at Graniteville and also in the St. Louis University, from which he won his Bachelor of Arts degree as a member of the class of 1908. While a student there he worked during his vacation periods at telegraphy and did stenographic work and thereby met the expenses of his college course. In 1910 he became associated with the Missouri State Life Insurance Company in the capacity of a stenographer and a year later was placed in charge of the medical department of the company. In 1915 he was made agency supervisor and thus won rapid advancement, due to his close application and ready adaptability, combined with his power to recognize and grasp...

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Biography of Pat Geraty

Pat Geraty, a merchant of Dowelltown, was born in 1832 at Castle Bar, County Mio, Ireland. He is one of six surviving children of a family of nine born to John and Catherine (Conway) Geraghty. The father was born in 1795, same place where Pat first saw the light. Early in life he was a carpenter, afterward a farmer. He died about 1880, in the vicinity in which he had always lived. The mother was born about 1798, in the same county, at Clare, and died in 1883. Our subject was educated in the common schools of his childhood’s home he was in Company G, Fourth United States Cavalry. He took part in the famous battles of Perryville, Murfreesboro, Lookout Mountain, Kennesaw Mountain, and Atlanta and in numerous skirmishes. He was honorably discharged at Gravely Springs, Ala., March 13, 1865, from the army in which he had so bravely fought for the preservation of the stars and stripes. He was very much enfeebled in health, from the hardships and exposures common to a soldier’s life, and remained delicate several years. Immediately after the restoration of peace, he established himself in the mercantile business in Clear Forks, Cannon County, Tenn., where he remained fourteen years, when he sold out and moved to Dowelltown, again embarking in the same business. About 1870 he married Sally Melissa, daughter of John and Julia...

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