Location: Idaho City Idaho

Biographical Sketch of Joseph C. Kelley

Joseph C. Kelley, one of the young business men of Malheur county, was born January 3, 1870, at Idaho City, Idaho, his parents being Joseph and Marrgaret (Thompson) Kelley, pioneers of that state. Joseph Kelley, senior, was a native of Farmington, Iowa, and was among those who in the early fifties sought the golden sands of California. After spending several years in California, in the middle sixties, Mr. Kelley again emigrated, going to Idaho and establishing himself in business as a mechanic at Idaho City. Here, in the closing days of 1870, the silver cord was broken and all that was earthly of the departed pioneer was laid at rest. A little while later the family removed to Oregon, settling near Nyssa, in this county, and in 1877, Mr. Kelley having meanwhile become the wife W. K.. Stark, the family again chose a new home, this time on Willow creek, where the subject of this sketch grew to manhood’s estate. The mother passed into the life beyond in August, 1817. Of the immediate family now living there are but two, Joseph and his brother, Melville D. Kelley. a prosperous ranch man residing on Willow creek. Mr. Kelley remained at home, engaged in ranching and stock raising, until 1898 when, having learned the saddler’s trade, he came to Vale and opened a small harness and saddle store. From a small...

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Biography of Charles A. Schnabel

Thirty-seven years have passed since Charles Augusta Schnabel came to Idaho. This state, so aptly termed “the gem of the mountains,” was then a wild district, its lands unclaimed, its resources undeveloped. A few courageous frontiersmen had dared to locate within its borders, but the work of progress and improvement remained to the future, and there was little promise of early development. In the years which have since passed Mr. Schnabel has not only witnessed a most wonderful transformation, but has largely aided in the labors which have transformed the wild tract into a splendid commonwealth. Now in his declining years he is living retired, enjoying the well-earned rest which is the merited reward of a long and honorable business career. A native of Prussia, Mr. Schnabel was born in Elberfield, October 18, 1828 and for generations his ancestors had resided in the fatherland. He acquired his education in the public schools, and in Germany learned the trade of fringe and lace weaving. When a young man of twenty years he determined to try his fortune in America, landing in New York on the day that Zachariah Taylor was elected president of the United States. He then made his way to Baltimore, Maryland, where he had a brother living, and in that city worked at his trade for a year, when, hearing of the rich gold discoveries in California,...

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Biography of John Wagener

John Wagener is one of the owners of the Trook and Jennings mine and five-stamp mill, one mile southeast of Silver City. He is also proprietor of several stock ranches and since pioneer days has been active in the development of the business resources of this state. A native of Germany, he came to America hoping to better his financial condition, and whatever success he has achieved is due entirely to his own labors. Mr. Wagener was born June 30, 1833 and in his native land acquired his education. When a young man of nineteen years he bade adieu to home and friends and in 1852 sailed for America, coming to this country in limited circumstances and without any knowledge of the language, manners or customs of the people. It is astonishing how rapidly our foreign-born citizens adapt themselves to new surroundings and be-come an integral part in our public life. Mr. Wagener took up his residence in New York City and began learning the wagon maker’s trade, at which he worked for a number of years. He then left the Atlantic for the Pacific coast, and in 1858 visited Idaho, when it was still a part of Washington Territory. He crossed the plains to Vancouver’s, thence came to Florence in 1862, and after engaging in placer-mining at the latter place for a year, went to Idaho City in...

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Biography of Thomas T. Redsull

Great, indeed, have been the changes that time and man have wrought since Thomas T. Redsull landed on the Pacific coast. California yet belonged to Mexico, and much of the land, especially in the southern part of the state, was divided into large estates, owned and occupied by Spanish families. Mr. Redsull was then but eleven years of age, yet had started out to make his own way in the world. He was born in the County of Kent, England, on the 15th of November, 1827, a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Goymer) Redsull, both of whom were natives of England and representatives of ancient families of that country. They were both members of the Episcopal Church, and the father was a collector of excise for the government. He departed this life in 1858, at the age of fifty years, and his widow is now living at the age of one hundred and three years. They had seven children, but only three are now living. Mr. Redsull of this review acquired his early education in England, and when only eleven years of age was bound out as an apprentice to the Hudson’s Bay Company, and in their service came to the United States in 1838, landing in California. He is consequently one of the oldest pioneers of that state. The same year he also went to Oregon, and therefore...

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Biography of James P. Gray

Thirty-five years have passed since James P. Gray came to Idaho to cast in his lot with its pioneers. People of the present end-of-the-century period can scarcely realize the struggles and dangers which attended the early settlers, the heroism and self-sacrifice of lives passed upon the borders of civilization, the hardships endured, the difficulties overcome. These tales of the early days read almost like a romance to those who have known only the modern prosperity and conveniences. To the pioneer of the early days, far removed from the privileges and conveniences of city or town, the struggle for existence was a stern and hard one, and these men and women must have possessed indomitable energies and sterling worth of character, as well as marked physical courage, when they thus voluntarily selected such a life and successfully fought its battles under such circumstances as prevailed in the northwest. James P. Gray was a young man of eighteen years when he took up his residence in the mining camp at Idaho City. His early life was spent in Illinois, his birth having occurred in Peoria County, that state, December 10, 1846. He is of Scotch-Irish ancestry, and his grandfather, William Gray, emigrated from the north of Ireland with his wife, taking up his residence in Indiana, where occurred the birth of Thomas Gray, the father of our subject. In the Hoosier...

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Biography of James H. Hawley

No Compendium such as the province of this work defines in its essential limitations will serve to offer fit memorial to the life and accomplishments of the honored subject of this sketch a man remarkable in the breadth of his wisdom, in his indomitable perseverance, his strong individuality, and yet one whose entire life has not one esoteric phase, being an open scroll, inviting the closest scrutiny. True, his have been “massive deeds and great” in one sense, and yet his entire life accomplishment but represents the result of the fit utilization of the innate talent which is his, and the directing of his efforts in those lines where mature judgment and rare discrimination lead the way. There is in Mr. Hawley a weight of character, a native sagacity, a far-seeing judgment and a fidelity of purpose that commands the respect of all. A man of indefatigable enterprise and fertility of resource, he has carved his name deeply on the record of the political, commercial and professional history of the state, which owes much of its advancement to his efforts. James H. Hawley was born in Dubuque, Iowa, on the 17th of January 1847, and in his veins mingles the blood of English, Dutch and Irish ancestors. The Hawley family was founded in America in 1760. William Carr, the maternal great-grandfather of our subject, was a major in the...

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Biography of John Brodbeck

One of the representative businessmen of Boise, Mr. Brodbeck, is a pioneer of Idaho, having come to this state in 1865. He is a native of Switzerland, where he was born April 4, 1833, and was reared and educated in his native land and there learned the brewing business. His parents were Nicholas and Elizabeth (Hagler) Brodbeck, the former of whom was a miller by trade, and he and his wife were members of the Lutheran church and were people of high respectability in the old country. He died in his fifty-third year and his wife survived him until attaining the advanced age of eighty-five years. They had five sons and two daughters, one of the latter and our subject being the only ones now living. After leaving school Mr. Brodbeck entered a commercial house, remaining there four years and then became connected with a brewing house. Subsequently he came to America, landing at New York, whence he journeyed to California in 1857 and settled at Scott Valley, where he had a brother living near Fort Jones. General Crook was then a second lieutenant at the fort and Mr. Brodbeck became intimately acquainted with him. Our subject was engaged in farming for a few years, but hearing of the silver discoveries in Nevada he sold out and went to that state, where he remained a year and then decided...

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Biography of Thomas Davis

The founders of a state are not merely the men who handle the reins of government and control the public policy, but are also those who carry civilization into hitherto wild regions and develop the natural resources of the state: Such an one is Mr. Davis, who came to Idaho in pioneer days and was the first to establish the fact that this is an excellent fruit-producing region. Thus he introduced a new industry and thereby largely promoted the material welfare of the region. His business interests have ever been energetically and successfully managed and his reputation in commercial circles is above reproach. Mr. Davis is a native of Ohio, his birth having occurred in Cincinnati, on the 2d of January 1838. His father died during the early childhood of the son, who was then bound out until he had attained his majority. He was sent to the district school during the winter season, while during the summer months he labored early and late in the cultivation of the fields. When a young man of twenty-three years he joined a company of seventy-five men en route for the west. He drove his own team of mules and was accompanied by his brother Francis, who has since died. They were persuaded by some Mormons to travel by way of the Sublette cut-off. Fort Lemhi was then occupied by Mormons. At...

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Biography of James I. Crutcher

One to whom has been entrusted important public service and over whose record there falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil, is James I. Crutcher, of Boise. President Cleveland recognized his eminent qualifications for responsible duties when he appointed him United States marshal for Idaho, in which position he served for four years and two months, in a manner above suspicion. His unbending integrity of character, his fearlessness in the discharge of duty and his appreciation of the responsibilities that rested upon him were such as to make him a most acceptable incumbent of that office, and his worth then, as now, was widely acknowledged. A native of Kentucky, Mr. Crutcher was born in Shelby County, on the 31st of December 1835. His ancestors were early settlers of Virginia and North Carolina, and members of the family became pioneers in the development of Kentucky. It was in that state that Thomas M. Crutcher, father of our subject, was born, his natal clay being in 1810. He wedded Miss Mary Ann Edwards, a native of Woodford County, Kentucky, who also belonged to a family of equally early settlement in the south. Her father was James Edwards, a pioneer widely and favorably known in Kentucky. Thomas M. Crutcher was an enterprising farmer, and through the capable management of his agricultural interests won a comfortable competence. He held membership in...

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Biography of Joseph Pinkham

Canada has furnished to the United States many bright, enterprising young men who have left the Dominion to enter the business circles of this country with its more progressive methods, livelier competition and advancement more quickly secured. Among this number is Mr. Pinkham. He has somewhat of the strong, rugged and persevering characteristics developed by his earlier environments, which, coupled with the livelier impulses of the New England blood of his ancestors, made him at an early day seek wider fields in which to give full scope to his ambition and industry his dominant qualities. He found the opportunity he sought in the freedom and appreciation of the growing western portion of the country. Though born across the border, he is thoroughly American in thought and feeling, and is patriotic and sincere in his love for the stars and stripes. His career is identified with the history of Idaho, where he has acquired a competence and where he is an honored and respected citizen. Thrice has he served as United States marshal of Idaho, and is accounted one of her bravest pioneers. Mr. Pinkham was born in Canada, on the 15th of December, 1833 and is a representative of an old New England family who were early settlers of Maine. The first of the name to come to America was Thomas Pinkham, a native of Wales, who established his...

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Biography of Hon. James G. Watts

Among the practitioners of the bar of Silver City, Idaho, is James G. Watts, who is also a distinguished member of the state senate. Pennsylvania is the state of his nativity, his birth having occurred in the town of Wellsboro, July 23, 1858. His father, Daniel Watts, was a native of England, and on crossing the Atlantic to America took up his residence in New York, whence he afterward removed to the Keystone state. There he was married to Miss Harriet Goodrich, a native of Tioga county, Pennsylvania, and a representative of an old Puritan family. During the civil war the father entered the service of his country as a member of the Union army, and participated in the celebrated march to the sea. He died in a New York hospital of disease contracted in the service, leaving a widow and five children. The mother of these children died in 1890, when she had attained the age of sixty years. James G. Watts acquired his literary education in the Mansfield (Ohio) Normal School, where he was graduated in the class of 1880. For a number of years he successfully engaged in teaching school, and then began preparation for the legal profession as a student in the law office of Hon. T. W. McNealy, of Pittsburg, Illinois. Later he attended the Union College of Law, of Chicago, and was admitted...

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Biography of Jonas W. Brown

Jonas W. Brown, of Boise, is an honored pioneer both of California and of Idaho. He crossed the plains with ox teams to Shasta county, California, in 1853, and since that time his life record has been inseparably interwoven with the history of this section of the country. At all times he has been the advocate of those measures tending to-ward the advancement and development of the region, and his influence is that of an honorable, upright man, whose force of character stamps itself indelibly for good upon the public life. This work would be incomplete without mention of Jonas W. Brown, and it is therefore with pleasure that we present his sketch to our readers. A native of Ohio, he was born in Roscoe, Coshocton County, on the 27th of June, 1825, and is descended from New England ancestry. His father, Samuel Brown, was a resident of North Danvers, Massachusetts. His mother, Mrs. Lydia (Warren) Brown, was a relative of General Warren, who won fame at the battle of Bunker Hill. They were members of the Methodist church and were people of much worth. The father was a farmer and also engaged in the manufacture of brick. He departed this life in 1871, at the age of eighty-four years, and his wife was called to her final rest in her fifty-sixth year. They had a family of ten...

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Biography of Alonzo L. Richardson

Thirty-eight years have passed since Alonzo L. Richardson came to Idaho, then a sparsely populated territory of the extreme northwest, its splendid resources undeveloped, its advancement a development of the future. For many years he has been closely identified with the work of progress, and is now filling the position of clerk of the United States court in Boise. A native of Missouri, Mr. Richardson was born in Franklin County that state, on The 19th of December 1841, and is a representative of one of the old families of Virginia. His ancestors located there in 1750, and there occurred the birth of Daniel Richardson, the great grand father of our subject. He removed from the Old Dominion to Kentucky and subsequently to Missouri, being a pioneer of those states. The father of our subject also bore the name of Daniel Richardson and was a native of Kentucky. He married Dorcas Caldwell, a native of Missouri, and in 1843 started with his family to cross the plains to Oregon, being in the second emigration to that far distant territory. Gold had not then been discovered in California, and the tide of emigration had not set toward the Pacific coast. The hardships and dangers of such an undertaking were many, and to add to the difficulties the father was taken ill and died at Fort Hall, Idaho, then a Hudson Bay...

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Biography of Warren P. Hunt

Warren Palmerton Hunt, who has been a highly respected citizen of Lewiston since 1862, and is numbered among the California pioneers of 1854, was born in Erie County, New York, March 13, 1832, a son of Isaac and Diantha (Allbee) Hunt, the former a native of Vermont and the latter of the Empire state. In 1852 the father went by way of the Cape Horn route to California, but returned to his farm in Erie County, where he made his home until his death, which occurred in the eighty-sixth year of his age. His wife passed away in her eighty-second year, and both died on the old family homestead in New York, where they had spent the greater part of their lives. They were honest, industrious farming people, highly respected by all. They held membership in the Christian church, and Mr. Hunt gave his political support to the Republican party. Warren P. Hunt was the eldest in their family of three children, and was reared upon the old homestead, attending the public schools through the winter months, while in the summer he assisted in the labors of field and meadow. In 1854 he sailed from New York for San Francisco, reaching the latter place after a month’s voyage. He then went directly to the mines in Sonora, Tuolumne County, California, and engaged in mining for about six years, meeting...

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Biography of Edward S. Jewell

Edward S. Jewell dates his residence in the Salubria valley from 1869, and is therefore numbered among its pioneer farmers and stock-raisers. A native of Wisconsin, he was born in Dodgeville, Iowa County, that state, on the 9th of October 1846, and is of English extraction. His father, Edward S. Jewell, Sr., was born in Cornwall, England, and after his marriage came with his wife and five children to the United States, locating in Wisconsin, where he remained until 1852, when he went to California to secure gold in the Eldorado of the west. It is believed that he was killed by the Indians, for no news was ever afterward received of him. His wife survived him two years and died in 1854, leaving a family of six children, three of whom are now living in Idaho. She was a devout member of the Methodist Church. In the public schools of his native state Edward S. Jewell, the subject of this sketch, acquired his education. He was only sixteen years of age when he drove a team across the hot and arid plains to California, in company with his uncle, LT. E. Rowe, and S. B. Dilley. They continued their travel to Auburn, Oregon, where Mr. Jewell learned the blacksmith’s trade. The following year he went to Idaho City, there continuing to work at his trade, at which there...

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