Location: Hillsborough New Hampshire

Biographical Sketch of Captain Cummings Pierce

Captain Cummings Pierce was born in Hillsborough, N.H., May 22, 1803, a son of Nathan and Phebe (Cummings) Pierce. He was a first cousin of the late President Pierce. His parents removed from Hillsborough to Bradford in 1821, and bought the Pierce homestead, now occupied by Freeman H. Gillingham. Cummings Pierce succeeded to the ownership of the home farm, and continued the improvement of the land, clearing a large part of it, and soon after his marriage erected the present residence. He belonged for some years to an artillery company in the old State militia, serving as Captain the most of the time. He was strictly honorable and upright, Captain Pierce was no exception. He served in all the town offices, and for many years was Selectman. In 1860 and 1861 he served as a Representative in the State legislature. In 1833 Captain Pierce married Caroline Dowlin, who died April 14, 1874, leaving two children, namely: Lucetta, who married John H. Ewins, and died January 27, 1891; and Annie, who was the first wife of Freeman H. Gillingham, and died February 17, 1893. Captain Pierce survived his wife and both daughters, passing away November 13,...

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Biography of Hon. Isaac Darwin Merrill

Hon. Isaac Darwin Merrill, a well-known public man of Contoocook, is a son of Isaac and Mary (Wyman) Merrill, born October 1, 1814, in Hopkinton village, N.H. The father, a native of Hollis, Hillsborough County, born June 15, 1784, was a cooper by trade, and worked in Boston, Portland, and Troy, N.Y. When Isaac D. was about a year old, the family moved from Hopkinton to Hillsborough Bridge, where his father was employed at his trade. Later, more than sixty years ago, he settled in Contoocook, built the house where the subject of this sketch now resides, worked at his trade for some time longer, and died there, September 8, 1883, aged ninety-nine years, two months, and twenty-four days. He is well remembered in the community, among whom he is still spoken of as “Boss Merrill .” He was a man of strong frame and good health, industrious and apt to outdo his coworkers. Shortly before his death he became blind; and his last years were spent quietly at the homestead with his son, Isaac Darwin Merrill. He had three wives, whom he outlived. His first marriage was made with Mary Wyman, of Deering, who died May 31, 1843. She had eight children, six of whom, three sons and three daughters, reached maturity. The eldest, Clarinda, married Joseph L. Upton, of Contoocook, where she died after passing her eightieth...

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Biography of Rev. Henry Harrison Hartwell

Rev. Henry Harrison Hartwell is an esteemed resident of Allenstown, where he has served for a long time as Superintendent of Schools and in other important town offices. He was born in Hillsborough, N.H., October 18, 1819, son of William and Betsey (Wilkins) Hartwell. His grandfather, John Hartwell, was a typical New Hampshire man, strong in mind and body, and respected by all who knew him. John Hartwell taught school in early life. In 1724 he was Highway Surveyor; and in 1757 he was Selectman of Concord, N.H. A member of the State militia, he was Ensign some time previous to 1741. He married Mary, daughter of Job and Mary (Hartwell) Parling, and reared a large family. His son, William, born August 26, 1795, in Hillsborough, besides working at his trade of carpenter, also cultivated a farm. An industrious man and endowed with great bodily strength, William looked for little leisure during his life. In politics he was a Democrat, in religious belief a Methodist. He died April 14, 1861, and his wife died at the age of eighty-four. Eleven children were born to them, two daughters and nine sons. Of these the survivors are: Henry Harrison and Elizabeth J. The latter is the wife of William II. Collins, of Cambridge, Mass., and the mother of three children-Hattie, Herbert, and Annie. Henry Harrison Hartwell acquired most of his education...

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Biography of George Cook, M.D.

George Cook, M.D., a prominent physician of Concord, was born at Dover, this State, November 16, 1848, son of Solomon and Susan Ann (Hayes) Cook. His early education was obtained in the Concord High School and in Franklin Academy. In 1865 he began to read medicine with Drs. Charles P. Gage and Granville P. Conn, of Concord. Also he attended a course of lectures on medicine at Burlington, Vt., and two courses at the School of Medicine of Dartmouth College. After graduating from the last-named school in 1869, he immediately began the practice of his profession in Henniker, N.H., where he remained for a year. During the next five years, from 1870 to 1875, he was at Hillsborough, this State, and while there won for himself wide recognition as an able and skilful practitioner. In 1872 he had charge of seventeen cases of small-pox. He was made Superintendent of Schools at Hillsborough in 1874. In May of the following year he came to Concord, where he has since resided. Dr. Cook is a member of the Centre District Medical Society, and in 1882 was its president. He is also a member of the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States, of the American Medical Association, and of the New Hampshire State Medical Society. In 1890 he was senior delegate of the last-named society to Dartmouth College, and delivered...

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Biography of Uriah Wilkins

Uriah Wilkins, born at Amherst, N. H., married Nancy Kitridge, of that town, and at an early day immigrated to Stowe, where he reared a family of eight children, as follows : Uriah, Nancy, George, Fanny K., Charles A., Elizabeth W., Ingalls, and Mary E. Uriah resides in Stowe, a retired farmer. Nancy died of consumption. George is a practicing attorney of this town. Fanny K. is the wife of Nathaniel Robinson. Charles A. resides in Milford, N. H. Elizabeth W. is the widow of John B. Seaver, and resides in Cambridge village. Ingalls died in California. Mary E. died here, the wife of N. R. Raymond. George studied law herewith Messrs. Butler & Bingham, and was admitted to the bar in the December term of 1841. Some months previous to his admission, Hon. O. W. Butler, of the firm with whom he was studying, appreciating his talents and abilities, offered him a partnership in the business, which he accepted, continuing the connection until 1845. At this time Mr. Wilkins purchased the law library of Mr. Butler and took into partnership L.. A. Small, who had been a law student in the office of Messrs. Butler & Wilkins three years. Since the expiration of that partnership Mr. Wilkins has continued the practice of his profession alone. As a lawyer he stands in the front rank, and as an advocate...

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