Location: Hancock County TN

Fairchild, Lewis – Obituary

Mr. G.T. Fairchild received the sad news last Friday evening that his son, Lewis, had died at 6:45 that morning in a hospital in Memphis, Tenn. Mr. Fairchild left Wallowa a few days before Christmas for a visit to his old home in Tenn. He stopped a few days in Colorado and got as far on his way as Memphis. No details have been received of his death but it is supposed that he was taken ill enroute and was taken to the hospital where he died. He was a very jovial young man and had many friends through out the valley. Wallowa County Reporter, Wallowa County, Oregon, Thursday January 9, 1919 Obituary Lewis Fairchild was born in Sneedfield, Hancock County, Tennessee, August 6, 1890 and died at Memphis, Tennessee, January 3rd, 1919, being (28) 8 years old, 4 months and 27 days of age. He was the son of Mr. And Mrs. G. J. Fairchild of Wallowa, Oregon and came to this county about 19 years ago with his parents. He left Wallowa, December, 21 for a visit to his old home in Tennessee. After stopping a few days at Fort Collins Colorado, he proceeded on his way. He wrote to his family from Fort Collins, that he had a bad cold. The next heard from him was a telegram from Memphis, Tennessee announcing his death. He leaves...

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Biography of Basil Tonion Barber

Basil Tonion Barber. The ever-changing conditions of present-day competition in business life offer splendid opportunities for men of foresight and sagacity in any growing locality, whether it be developing from wilderness to settlement or from hamlet to metropolis. The ability to recognize in advance the strategic commercial situation is an asset the value of which may not be overestimated, and the man who possesses this quality is bound to find himself, sooner or later, in a position of importance in the business world. It was through the ability to predict where business would develop and to know in advance what kind of business would flourish that had enabled Basil Tonion Barber, of Iola, to reach a position of eminence at an age when most men are just starting upon their careers. When he located at Iola, in 1910, he was still a youth, with only several years’ experience behind him, but he confidently embarked upon his career, and today finds himself at the head of a paying automobile and garage business and proprietor of the largest establishment in the city. Basil T. Barber was born at Sunnyside, a small community of Tennessee, May 27, 1885, and is a son of W. L. and Emily (Condra) Barber. He is descended from Irish ancestors who came to the United States during the colonial period and settled as pioneers in Kentucky, where...

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Black-Indian History

The first black slaves were introduced into the New World (1501-03) ostensibly to labor in the place of the Indians, who showed themselves ill-suited to enforced tasks and moreover were being exterminated in the Spanish colonies. The Indian-black inter-mixture has proceeded on a larger scale in South America, but not a little has also taken place in various parts of the northern continent. Wood (New England’s Prospect, 77, 1634) tells how some Indians of Massachusetts in 1633, coming across a black in the top of a tree were frightened, surmising that; ‘he was Abamacho, or the devil.” Nevertheless, inter-mixture of Indians and blacks has occurred in New England. About the middle of the 18th century the Indians of Martha’s Vineyard began to intermarry with blacks, the result being that “the mixed race increased in numbers and improved in temperance and industry.” A like inter-mixture with similar a results is reported about the same time from parts of Cape Cod. Among the Mashpee in 1802 very few pure Indians were left, there being a number of mulattoes 1Mass Hist. Soc. Coll., r, 206; iv, 206; ibid., 2d s., iii, 4; cf. Prince in Am. Anthrop., ix, no. 3, 1907. Robert Rantoul in 1833 2Hist. Coll. Essex Inst., xxiv, 81 states that “the Indians are said to be improved by the mixture.” In 1890, W. H. Clark 3Johns Hopk. Univ. Circ.,...

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Gorrell, Uva L. Dodson Mrs. – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Uva L. Gorrell, 89, a longtime Baker City resident, died March 29, 2003, at her home. Her funeral will be at 1 p.m. Thursday at Coles Funeral Home, 1950 Place St. Dean Baxter will officiate. Vault interment will be at Mount Hope Cemetery. Visitations will be from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday at the funeral home. Mrs. Gorrell was born at Sneedville, Tenn., on Sept. 4, 1913, to Aberham John and Bertha Hewitt Dodson. She was raised and educated at Ava, Mo. She came to Baker City in 1939. Mrs. Gorrell was an accomplished gardener, an avid fisherwoman and she enjoyed family and her home. Survivors include her husband, Ross Gorrell of Baker City; a daughter, Birchie Westerlund of Pendleton; daughter and son-in-law, Shirley and James Adamson of Baker City; daughter, Arlene Schoen of Baker City; five grandsons, Curtis and Chad Westerlund and Terry, Mark and Gary Schoen; eight great-grandchildren and seven great-great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents, a brother and sister. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Elizabeth Health Services or Pathway Hospice through Coles Funeral Home, 1950 Place St. Baker City, OR 97814. Used with permission from: Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, April 4, 2003 Transcribed by: Belva...

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