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Location: Green County MO

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. A. J. Moore

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Ga-sa-du-e-sge) —Bessie Shutt, born at Springfield, Missouri February 4, 1874, educated at Springfield Wagoner, December 12, 1900, A. J., son of J. W. and Elizabeth Moore. A. J. and Bessie (Shutt) Moore are the parents of: Howard W., born October 17, 1901 and Malcolm, born January 2, 1904. Mr. Moore is a pharmacist and Mrs. Moore is a member of the Christian Scientist church and is a Rebecca. Delilah Amelia, daughter of James and Elizabeth Vann was born in 1795, married David McNair, born 1774. He died August 15, 1836 and she died November 30, 1838. Their daughter Elizabeth married John Bean amid John Weir. Her children were: Amelia, David, Talbert, Augustus, William E. and Almira Neely Bean; Susan Virginia amid Clementine Weir. The latter was born May 15, 1848 and married at Springfield, Missouri, February 9, 1865 Augustus A. Shutt, a native of Virginia. He died April 8, 1875. They were the parents of Ella Virginia, John Weir amid Bessie Shutt. The latter the subject of this sketch. Benjamin Gold of Litchfield, Connecticut, the father-in-law of Elias Boudinot stopped at the home of David and Delilah Amelia McNair in October 1829 and in a letter to his brother Hezekiah wrote. “He had a beautiful white house, and about six or seven hundred acres of...

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Biography of Stanford Chapman

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Missouri Few men have lived more quietly and unostentatiously than Mr. Stanford Chapman, and yet few have exerted a more salutary influence upon the immediate society in which they move, or impressed a community with a more profound reliance on their honor, ability and sterling worth. His life has not been marked by startling or striking contrasts, but it has shown how a laudable ambition may be gratified when accompanied by pure motives, perseverance, industry and steadfastness of purpose. Mr. Chapman came originally from Tennessee, his...

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Houses of the Illinois Confederacy

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Although the tribes of the loosely constituted Illinois confederacy claimed and occupied a wide region east of the Mississippi, in later years centering in the valley of the Illinois River, nevertheless certain villages are known to have crossed and re-crossed the great river. Thus, in the early summer of 1673, Père Marquette arrived at a village of the Peoria then standing on the right Mississippi, at or near the or west bank of the later it had removed to the upper Illinois. Two months passing the Peoria, Marquette discovered another of  the Illinois tribes, the Michigamea, living near the northeastern corner of the present State of Arkansas, and consequently west of the Mississippi. On the map of Pierre van der Aa, circa 1720 two small streams are shown flowing into the Mississippi from the west, a short distance south of the Missouri. The more northerly of the two is probably intended to represent the Meramec and a dot at the north side of the mouth of the stream bears the legend: “Village des Ilinois et des Caskoukia “probably the Cahokia. This stream forms the boundary between Jefferson and St. Louis Counties, Missouri, and a short distance above its junction with the Mississippi are traces of a large villages with many stone-lined graves, probably indicating the position...

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Biography of Major J. Berry King

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now J. Berry King is now engaged in the general practice of law in Muskogee. Born in Harrison, Arkansas, May 29, 1888, he is a son of Alfred and Laura (McCormick) King, the father a banker and merchant of Harrison for a number of years, there successfully carrying on extensive business interests. In 1909, however, he removed to Oklahoma, where he resided until his death, which occurred in December, 1918. Major King received a public and high school education in Springfield, Missouri, and afterward attended the University of Arkansas, from 1903 until 1907. He then made preparation for his professional career as a law student in the University of Virginia and is numbered among its alumni of 1910. In that year he opened an office in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, where he engaged in practice until. 1917, being associated with Hon. W. W. Hastings. Upon the election of Mr. Hastings to congress Major King removed to Muskogee, where he has since devoted his attention to general practice, and his clientage is now very extensive and of an important character. He is well grounded in the principles of common law and remains a diligent student of those elementary principles that constitute the basis of all legal science. This knowledge has served him well in many a legal battle before the...

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