Location: Genesee County NY

Letter from Frederick Follet to Henry R. Schoolcraft

Letter from Frederick Follet to Henry R. Schoolcraft Batavia, Oct. 25, 1845. Dear Sir My private and public duties together prevented my making a visit to “Fort Hill,” until the 22d inst. and I proceed to give you my ideas of that formation. The ground known as “Fort Hill” is situated about three miles north of the village of Le Roy, and ten or twelve miles northeast from Batavia, the capitol of Genesee county. The better view of “Fort Hill” is had to the north of it, about a quarter of a mile, on the road leading from Bergen to Le Roy. From this point of observation it needs little aid of the imagination to conceive that it was erected as a fortification by a large and powerful army, looking for a permanent and almost inaccessible bulwark of defense. From the center of the “Hill,” in the northwesterly course, the country lies quite flat immediately north, and inclining to the east, the land is also level for one hundred rods, when it rises nearly as high as the “Hill,” and continues for several miles quite elevated. In approaching the “Hill” from the north it stands very prominently before you, rising rather abruptly, though not perpendicularly, to the height of eighty or ninety feet, extending about forty rods on a line east and west, the corners being round or truncated,...

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Letter from C. Dewey to Henry R. Schoolcraft

Letter from C. Dewey to Henry R. Schoolcraft, Fort Hill. This is celebrated as being the remains of some ancient work, and was supposed to have been a fort. Though the name is pronounced as if hill was the name of some individual, yet the place is a fort on a hill, in the loose use of the word. The name designates the place as Fort Hill, to distinguish it from the hills which have no fort on them. Neither is it a hill, except as you rise from the swale on the north, for it is lower than the land to which it naturally belongs. As you pass towards Fort Hill in the road from LeRoy village, which is about three miles to the south, you descend a little most of the distance to this place. The road passes a little west of the middle of the space nearly north and south. The shape is quadrangular, and is shown in the diagram or ground plot. On the right and east side is the deep water course of Allen s Creek, cut down through the rocks for a mile or more, perhaps one hundred and thirty feet deep; on the north is that of Fordham’s Brook, of nearly the same depth, which drains a wide swale from the north and northwest; and on the west is a short and deep...

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Ancient Entrenchments on Fort Hill, near Le Roy, Genesee County

The following diagram of this work has been drawn from a pen-sketch, forwarded by the Rev. Mr. Dewey, of Rochester. The work occurs on an elevated point of land formed by the junction of a small stream, called Fordham’s Brook, with Allen’s Creek, a tributary of the Genesee River. Its position is about three miles north of the village of Le Roy, and some ten or twelve northeast of Batavia. The best view of the hill, as one of the natural features of the country, is obtained a short distance north of it, on the road from Bergen to...

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Tonawanda Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The Tonawanda Reservation, in the counties of Erie, Genesee, and Niagara, New York, as originally surveyed in 1799, and as reserved by the treaty at Big Tree, covered 71 square miles. Coincident with a treaty between the United States and this band of Seneca Indians, March 31, 1859, promulgated November 5, 1859, the claim of the Ogden Land Company was extinguished, and the present reservation limits embrace 7,549.73 acres, lying partly in each of the counties of Erie, Genesee, and Niagara. One heavy dirt road, almost impassable in the spring or an ordinarily wet season, runs out from the center of Akron, sending a fork into the reservation at a distance of more than 3 miles. A second road, running northeasterly from Akron, enters the reservation at a distance of about 25 miles, at the point where the West Shore railroad enters the reservation, as indicated on the map. Up to this point the road is very well maintained. Half a mile from this point lies a triangular piece of land, which is occupied by the Indian Baptist Church, the Indian Methodist Church, an old council house, schoolhouse No. 2, and the new house of Eliza, with of David Moses, a chief of the Wolf tribe, and a prominent member of the christian party. From this central triangle 3 roads take their departure. The first runs northwest, leaving the...

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Reservations of the Six Nations in New York and Pennsylvania, 1723-1890

The accompanying map was prepared in 1771 under the direction of William Tryon, captain general and governor in chief of the province of New York, and is as nearly suggestive of the then recognized boundary of the Six Nations as any that has had official sanction. In 1851 Lewis H. Morgan, assisted by Ely S. Parker, a Seneca chief; and afterward an efficient staff Officer of General Grant, and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, prepared a map for a volume entitled League of the Iroquois, which aimed to define the villages, trails, and boundaries of the Five Nations as...

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Biography of Hon. George Peabody Little

Hon. George Peabody Little is an influential citizen of Pembroke, N.H. In his veins flows the blood of two old and reputable New England families, the Littles of Newbury, Mass., and the Peabodys of Danvers, the famous banker and philanthropist, George Peabody, having been his kinsman. Mr. Little was born in Pembroke, N.Y., June 20, 1834, a son of Dr. Elbridge G. and Sophronia Phelps (Peabody) Little. He is of the eighth generation of Littles in this country, tracing his descent from George Little, who settled in old Newbury, Mass., in 1640 or soon after. George Little was a tailor by trade, and, like most of 1650 he bought the freehold right in Newbury of John Osgood, Sr.; and he subsequently made many other purchases of land. The date of his death is uncertain, but is probably 1693 or 1694. He married first Alice Poor, who came from England in 1638. She died December 1, 1680, aged sixty-two. She was the mother of all his children, five in number. His second wife, Eleanor, widow of Thomas Barnard, of Amesbury, Mass., survived him, dying November 27, 1694. Joseph, the second child and eldest son of George and Alice (Poor) Little, is next in line of descent. He was born in Newbury, September 22, 1653, and was a permanent resident of the part of the town now called Newburyport from 1700...

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Biographical Sketch of Benjamin G. Kimball

Benjamin G. Kimball is a native of the town of Bradford, Essex county, Massachusetts, and was born November 17, 1814. He was educated at the Bradford College, of Bradford, Massachusetts. His father died when he was young, and when fourteen years old he began clerking in a dry goods house in Genesee county, New York; three years later he changed to the boot and shoe business, and was engaged in that business, as clerk, for two years.. Then worked at the shoemaking business for five years. In 1837 he came to Missouri and settled in Ray county, where he was employed as clerk in the dry goods business for four years. From there he removed to this county and farmed for a while, then began business for himself, in what was then known as Cravensville, or Di-Amon, with a stock of dry goods and a general assortment of merchandise. After four years in that business, he sold out and engaged in farming until 1878, when he engaged in the lumber trade at Jameson, where we now find him doing a good business. He has ever been alive to the public prosperity of the county, and has filled several offices with credit to himself and county, and is at present recognized as one of the leading farmers and business men of the county. Mr. Kimball was united in marriage, February...

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Five Nations Burial Customs

Writing of the Iroquois or Five Nations, during the early years of the eighteenth century, at a time when they dominated the greater part of the present State of New York, it was said: “Their funeral Rites seem to be formed upon a Notion of some Kind of Existence after Death. They make a large round Hole, in which the Body can be placed upright, or upon its Haunches, which after the Body is placed in it, is covered with Timber, to support the Earth which they lay over, and thereby keep the Body free from being pressed; they then raise the Earth in a round Hill over it. They always dress the Corps in all its Finery, and put Wampum and other Things into the Grave with it; and the Relations suffer not Grass or any Weed to grow on the Grave, and frequently visit it with Lamentations.” The circular mound of earth over the grave was likewise mentioned a century earlier, having been seen at the Oneida village which stood east of the present Munnsville, Madison County, New York. “Before we reached the castle we saw three graves, just like our graves in length and height,; usually their graves are round. These graves were surrounded with palisades that they had split from trees, and they were closed up so nicely that it was a wonder to see....

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Stone Bill, or Tomahawk

The pointed mace, found in the early North American graves and barrows, is uniformly of a semi-lunar form. It appears to have been the Cassetete or head-breaker, such as we can only ascribe to a very rude state of society. It was employed by warriors prior to the introduction of the agakwut and tomahawk. All the specimens examined have an orifice in the center of the curve for the insertion of a handle. Its object was to penetrate, by its sharp points, the skull of the adversary. This was not done by cutting, as with the agakwut or mace, but by perforating the cranium by its own gravity, and the superadded force of the warrior. In an attack, it must have been a powerful weapon. A specimen (Figure 1, Plate 11) obtained through the intervention of F. Follett, Esq., from a small mound on the banks of the Tonawanda, near Batavia, New York, is of the following dimensions. Length, eight inches: breadth, one and a half inches: thickness, about one and a quarter inches. The material is a neutral-colored siliceous slate, exquisitely worked and polished. Its weight is half a pound. Another specimen (Figure 2, Plate 11) from Oakland County, Michigan, has both the lunar points slightly broken off, yet it weighs six and a half ounces. It is of the same material, but striped. It is, in all respects, a stouter instrument....

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Agreement of September 3, 1823

At a treaty held under the authority of the United States at Moscow, in the county of Livingston, in the State of New York, between the sachems, chiefs, and warriors of the Seneka nation of Indians in behalf of said nation, and John Greig and Henery B. Gibson of Canandaigua in the county of Ontario; in the presence of Charles Carroll, esquire, commissioner appointed by the United States for holding said treaty, and of Nathaniel Gorham, esquire, superintendent, in behalf of the State of Massachusetts. Know all men by these presents, that the said sachems, chiefs, and warriors, for and in consideration of the sum of four thousand two hundred and eighty-six dollars, lawful money of the United States, to them in hand paid by the said John Greig and Henry B. Gibson, at or immediately before the ensealing and delivery of these presents, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, have granted, bargained, sold, aliened, released, quit claimed and confirmed unto the said John Greig and Henry B. Gibson, and by these presents do grant, bargain, sell, alien, release, quit claim, and confirm, unto the said John Greig and Henry B. Gibson, their heirs and assigns, forever, all that tract, piece or parcel of land commonly called and known by the name of the Gordeau reservation, situate, lying and being in the counties of Livingston and Genesee, in the...

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Treaty of November 5, 1857

Articles of agreement and convention made this fifth day of November, in the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty seven, at the meeting house on the Tonawanda reservation, in the county of Genesee, and State of New York, between Charles E. Mix, commissioner on behalf of the United States, and the following persons, duly authorized thereunto by the Tonawanda band of Seneca Indians, viz: Jabez Ground, Jesse Spring, Isaac Shanks, George Sky, and Ely S. Parker. Whereas a certain treaty was heretofore made between the Six Nations of New York Indians and the United States on the 15th day of January, 1838, and another between the Seneca Nation of Indians and the United States on the 20th day of May, 1842, by which, among other things, the Seneca Nation of Indians granted and conveyed to Thomas Ludlow Ogden and Joseph Fellows the two certain Indian reservations in the State of New York known as the Buffalo Creek and the Tonawanda reservations, to be surrendered to the said Ogden and Fellows, on the performance of certain conditions-precedent defined in said treaties; and Whereas in and by the said treaties there were surrendered and relinquished to the United States 500,000 acres of land in the then Territory of Wisconsin; and Whereas the United States, in and by said treaties, agreed to set apart for said Indians certain lands in the...

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Biography of Channing John Brown

Channing John Brown. One of the most beautiful spots in the State of Kansas is Blue Rapids in Marshall County. Besides its picturesque location near a waterfall that had furnished power for manufacturing purposes for many years the town itself was originated by a colony of very substantial people from Genesee County, New York. The secretary of this company was Mr. C. J. Brown, still living in Blue Rapids. Mr. Brown is a former state senator and for many years was clerk of the Supreme Court of Kansas. Mr. Brown was born in Genesee County, New York, October 31, 1847. His father, John B. Brown, was born in the same county in 1816, grew up and married there and spent his active career as a farmer. He was one of the commissioners of the Genesee Colony who came out and founded the Town of Blue Rapids in 1869. His associates on this committee were Rev. C. F. Mussey and H. J. Bovee. Following them came about fifty families, comprising the Genesee Colony. A townsite of nearly 300 acres was secured, including the water power privileges, for $15,000, and in addition 8,000 acres of farming land was made available for the colonists. A stone dam was built in 1870, and in a short time Blue Rapids had attained the dignity of a city. John B. Brown himself located on a...

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Biography of Seth Ingalsbee

Seth Ingalsbee is now living retired at Wheaton, Kansas. His had been a long and useful career, and he is now past eighty-eight years of age. He served as a soldior during the Civil war, and came to Kansas a few years later and identified himself with the homesteading era in Pottawatomie County. Mr. Ingalsbee is of early English and of Revolutionary stock. There is a record of military service in almost every generation. The founder of the family and his remote ancestor was John Ingoldsby, who came from England and was a Colonial settler. Mr. Ingalsbee’s great-grandfather was Ebenezer Ingalsbee. He fought with the English army during the French and Indian wars, and was still in the British service when the Revolution broke out. He sided with the Colonists, and was commissioned a captain in the Revolutionary forces. As a precaution against being tried for desertion in the event that he should be captured by the enemy, he changed his name to Ingalsbee, the form of spelling which had ever since been practiced. Mr. Ingalsbee’s grandfather was also named Ebenezer Ingalsbee and also had service as a soldier in the Revolution. He was born at Worcester, Massachusetts, in which colony the family first located, and a number of years after the Revolution he emigrated to Western New York. He was a farmer and shoemaker and died in Cayuga...

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Biography of Carlton M. Lounsbury

Carlton M. Lounsbury has played a very effective and successful role in Kansas affairs for over fortyfive years and now, at the age of seventy-one, a young old man, is enjoying comfortable retirement at the city of Lincoln. Mr. Lounsbury is of an English family. It was his grandfather who came from England and first settled in Canada. Carlton M. Lounsbury’s father Rudolphus Lounsbury, was born in Canada in 1797, but when a young man came to the United States and settled in Western New York, in what was known as the “Holland Purchase.” He followed the vocation of agriculture and spent his active life largely in the Town of Bethany in Genesee County, where he died in 1870. He was a whig in politics, later afflliating with the republicans, and was an active member of the Free Will Baptist Church. He married Almira Brown, who was born in New York State in 1810 and died there in 1866. There were three children; Earl Byron, a graduate of Buffalo Medical College and a successful physician and surgeon until his death at Rochester in 1880; James A., also a graduate of Buffalo Medical College, practiced medicine for a number of years, but is now president of the Farmers State Bank at Barnard, Kansas, and his career is noted on other pages; Carlton M., the youngest of the three. The father...

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Biographical Sketch of Frank Mason Comstock

Comstock, Frank Mason; college prof.; born, LeRoy, N. Y., May 20, 1855; son of Samuel Frances and Mary Mason Turner Comstock; A. B., C. E., Union College, 1876; A. M., 1879; Ph. D., 1891; married, Louise Brown, of LeRoy, N. Y., June 29, 1882; on New York Adirondack survey, 1876 principal LeRoy Academic Institution, 1879-1891; prof. natural history and descriptive geometry, Case School of Applied Science, since 1891; member American Forestry Ass’n, Canadian Forestry Ass’n, National Geological Society, etc. Contributor to technical...

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