Location: Fulton County IL

Grewell, Vincent M. – Obituary

Capt. Vincent M. Grewell, a pioneer of Ipava, Ill., died Dec. 16, 1902, aged nearly 81 years.  Mrs. Jane Grewell, Dec. 28, 1902, aged 77 years.  There were just 14 days difference between the deaths of this aged couple, who had lived together for 52 years.  They had relatives in this valley:  E. D. Grewell, Clay, and Stanley Grewell, Mrs. Harvey McEwen [Martha Jane Grewell], and Mrs. William [Mary Grewell] Taylor. Contributed by:  Shelli...

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Biography of Albert Hutchison

ALBERT HUTCHISON. In the person of the subject of this sketch we have a living exemplification of the principles of success as wrought out by genuine industry and worth, having come to this county with but little of this world’s goods. Mr. Hutchison has here taken hold with his hands and his wise manipulation of resources that came before him, has placed him among the leading property owners of the county and his energy and enterprise, together with stanch integrity, have won for him the esteem and encomiums of his fellows, while the substantial proofs of the labor and care bestowed by him are encouraging to the younger men who may be starting in life’s battle for themselves. To Samuel and Elizabeth (Moore) Hutchison, on October 6, 1859, was born in Fulton county, Illinois, a son, Albert. The father responded to the call of patriotism and gave his life in the defense of his country and sleeps in the grave of the honored and brave men who gave back to us at the cost of their blood the Union safe and without dismemberment. In 1864, the mother with her four little children removed to the Cumberland valley in Pennsylvania and remained for fourteen years when they migrated to Ellsworth county, Kansas, whence later our subject went to Custer county, Colorado, and in 1882 he came with teams to the...

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Biographical Sketch of Joseph D. Combs

No citizen of Grant County stands higher in the estimation of his fellow men than Mr. Joseph D. Combs. Born in Fulton County, Ill., August 25, 1851, he came to Linn County, Oregon, when only a year old, and received his education there. At the age of nineteen, he came to Grant County, and followed teaming and several other callings. In 1892 he was elected sheriff of the county on the republican ticket, and by his affability and close adherence to duty secured the good will and esteem of the public to an extent that caused him to be re-elected again in 1894. Since the expiration of the latter term he has been engaged in the cattle business, making his tome in John Day. In 1875 he married Miss Sarah Carsner, of this county, and has two...

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Biography of David G. Fisher

David G. Fisher, now living retired at Champaign, began farming in this county nearly half a century ago. He realizes as few men still living do the difficulties and the handicaps to which farming was subject in those early years, and he has also realized along with extensive experience financial independence and the success which is the object of all ambitious men. Mr. Fisher was born in Fulton County, Illinois, December 3, 1839. His parents, Frederick and Sarah (Fouts) Fisher, were both born in Clark County, Indiana. When they went to Illinois in 1833 they passed through Champaign County, but sought what to them seemed a better location in Fulton County. There they lived prosperously the rest of their days as farmers and both of them died in that county. Their children were: Jacob, John, Henry, Cynthia, all now deceased; Mary, who still resides in Fulton County; Sarah, wife of Marion Kimberland, of Missouri; David G.; Clara, deceased; Isabel, living at Canton in Fulton County, widow of Jacob Fouts; Elizabeth, deceased; Ellen, wife of Thomas Beets, of Kokomo, Indiana; and Fred L., of Canton, Fulton County. David G. Fisher was reared and educated in Fulton County. He left home at the age of twenty-four and bought a farm of 140 acres near Canton and was busy with its cultivation and management until ill health compelled him to give up...

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Biography of Albert C. Blood

Albert C. Blood, who in 1904, organized the Maplewood Planing Mill Company, of which he has since been the president, has thus been connected with the manufacturing interests of St. Louis for seventeen years. He was born in Fulton county, Illinois, February 26, 1852. His father, Joseph P. Blood, was a native of New Hampshire and about 1850 removed to Illinois, settling in Fulton county, near Lewistown, where he engaged in the operation of a grist and saw-mill and also in stock raising. He married Elizabeth A. Ogden, a native of Indiana, who removed with her parents to Illinois, where her people were large land owners. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Blood was celebrated in Illinois, and they became the parents of three sons And three daughters, of whom Albert C. is the oldest. The father died in 1877, while the mother survived until 1884. Albert C. Blood was educated in the public schools of Henry, Illinois, and started out in the business world with the United States Express Company as a messenger between St. Louis and Chicago. He was employed for six years, after which he had various positions with manufacturers of farm machinery in Peoria. He then came to St. Louis and learned the cabinet-maker’s trade and in 1904 organized the Maplewood Planing Mill Company, of which he is the president. They do a...

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Biography of L. A. Saffer

L. A. SAFFER. The vocation of the pharmacist is unquestionably a highly important one in any and every community, for upon his care and skill, almost as much as upon that displayed by the medical profession, oftentimes depends the physical welfare – nay, the life or death of the sick or suffering. Among the favorably known druggists of Harrison, Arkansas, may be mentioned the name of L. A. Saffer, who has an attractive and well-appointed store. He was born in Canton, Illinois, April 5, 1854, the elder of two children born to John M. and Martha M. (Barnes) Saffer, the former of whom was born in the Hoosier State and became an early settler of Illinois, to which State he removed with his father, William Saffer, and was there reared to a knowledge of farming, an occupation which he pursued of his own accord in later years. When the Civil War came up John M. Saffer at once enlisted in the Eighty-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was one of the first to go forth to battle for his country, and was killed in the engagement at Kenesaw Mountain while with Sherman on his March to the Sea. He was a private, and was in a number of important engagements before the one in which he met his death. He was buried on the battlefield. The mother of the subject...

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Biographical of George W. Salisbury

George W. Salisbury is one of the younger men in Kansas educational affairs, and is principal of the Atchison County High School at Effingham, and is also president of the Atchison County Teachers’ Associntion. Mr. Salisbury is a native of Illinois, and is a graduate of the university of that state. He was born on a farm in Fulton County, Illinois, November 17, 1888. His ancestors, the Salisburys came originally from England, and there is also an admixture of French stock in the lineage. The Salisburys settled in the South in Colonial times, subsequently removing to Kentucky, where Mr. Salisbury’s grandfather Marcus was born in 1814. He became a pioneer in Fulton County, Illinois, where he followed farming until his death in 1898. William Salisbury, father of George W., was born in Fulton County, Illinois, in 1841, and remained throughout his life in that county, a prosperous farmer, His death occurred near Astoria, Illinois, in 1911. Politically he was a democrat. He married Angeline Stephens, who was born in Fulton County in 1849 and still lives there. Their children were: Leons, wife of M. S. Dutton, a Fulton County farmer; Mary, wife of Omer Severns, a farmer in McDonough County, Illinois; John W., occupying the home farm in Fulton County; Margaret, who resided with her mother; and George W. Mr. George W. Salisbury was educated primarily in the rural...

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Biography of Claude B. Warner, A. B., A. M., D. D. S.

Claude B. Warner, A. B., A. M., D. D. S., was born at Morrison, the county seat of Whiteside County, Illinois, May 6, 1872, and is a son of Edward B. and Elizabeth C. (Bryant) Warner, the former a native of Saint Louis and the latter of Herculaneum, Missouri. Edward B. Warner was a well-to-do business man of Morrison, and also a prominent citizen in the public life of Whiteside County, being county treasurer for a period of sixteen years, and for a like period a member of the board of equalization. His death occurred in 1891, while Mrs. Warner survived until 1916. They were the parents of seven children, as follows: Luella, who is the wife of F. C. Hitchcock, of Walden, Colorado; Arthur D., who is president of the Forest City Life Insurance Company at Rockford, Illinois; Dr. A. Lincoln, who is engaged in medical practice at Chicago; Bertha, who is the wife of Maj. R. M. Smith, U. S. A., of New York City; Dr. Eugene R., a practicing dentist of Denver, Colorado; Lena, who is the wife of Dr. James S. Mason, of Urbana; and Dr. Claude B. Claude B. Warner was seventeen years of age when he graduated from the Morrison High School, and at that time, feeling that he would enter upon a professional career, as had several of his brothers, he started...

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Biography of Nathan T. Veatch

Nathan T. Veatch has been superintendent of the city schools of Atchison since 1901. He is a veteran educator, and was teacher, principal or superintendent for a number of years before he came to Kansas. A native of Illinois, he was born on a farm near Astoria in Fulton County February 25, 1852, grew up in Schuyler County, attended the public schools, and had been teaching almost continuously since 1879. He taught his first term in Schuyler County, Illinois. In 1881 he was graduated from the Illinois Normal University at Normal. Mr. Veatch taught in Brown County, Illinois, was principal of a ward school at Little Rock, Arkansas, four years, and for fourteen years was superintendent of schools at Rushville. Then in 1901 he accepted the call to Atchison and had since been head of the school system of that city. Superintendent Veatch had under his management seven schools, a staff of seventy teachers, and about 2,200 scholars. His ancestors were English and Scotch who came from the North of England in Colonial times, locating in Delaware and Maryland. His grandfather, Nathan Veatch, was born in Indiana, and married Elizabeth Evans, for whose family the City of Evansville, Indiana, was named. Nathan Veatch was a farmer and a pioneer settler at Astoria, Illinois, but his declining years were spent with his son B. M. Veatch at Keytesville, Missouri, where he died....

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Biography of Neal J. Sharp

Many elements combine to make this brief biographical sketch an interesting one. It reaches back into the early history of our country, and has to do with the development of the new west. Neal J. Sharp, register of the United States land office at Hailey, was born in Fulton County, Illinois. July 14, 1833, of Scotch ancestry. His great-grandfather, Joseph L. Sharp, settled in Virginia and founded the town of Sharpsburg, which was named in his honor. His grandfather, James R. Sharp, was born in Tennessee, and fought gallantly for American independence in the war of the Revolution. Joseph L. Sharp, son of the patriot just mentioned, was also born in Tennessee, and did duty as a soldier in the Blackhawk war and in the war with Mexico. He married Matilda Singleton, of Irish lineage, whose ancestors were among the very early settlers in the south, and some of whom fought the British in Revolutionary days. By profession he was a lawyer, and he was a man of much force of character who was prominent wherever his lot was cast. He was elected to the legislature of Illinois and to that of Iowa, and was president of the first council of the Nebraska legislature. He died in his eighty-third year, his wife in her fifty-fifth. They had three sons and three daughters, of whom four survive. Neal J. Sharp,...

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Biography of Ephraim W. Baughman

Few men are more widely known in the northwest than Captain E. W. Baughman, of Lewiston, who for forty-eight years has sailed on the rivers in this section of the country. His circle of friends is indeed extensive, and his genial manner and social disposition win him the regard of all. He was born in Fulton County, Illinois, May 18, 1835, and is of German lineage, his ancestors having long been residents of Pennsylvania, however. His father, John Baughman, was born in that state and married Miss Jane Murphy, a lady of German descent. In an early day they removed to Illinois, settling in the west before the Black Hawk war. The father secured a farm in Fulton County and there reared his family of nine children, four of whom are yet living. He departed this life in the eightieth year of his age, and his wife passed away when about the same age Captain Baughman, their fifth child, was reared in the state of his nativity until his sixteenth year, and then crossed the plains with ox teams to California, in 1850. The party with which he traveled took with them a year’s provisions, but found they had more than they needed, and on reaching California they sold their surplus supply of flour, bacon, beans and sugar for two dollars per pound. The Captain engaged at placer mining...

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Biography of Robert C. Heizer, Judge

Judge Robert C. Heizer. For fourteen years Judge Robert C. Heizer had been on the district bench at Osage City, and the dignities and honors of his later years are a merited tribute to a man who had always relied upon the principle of self help and endured many of the vicissitudes and hardships of early life in Kansas. He was brought to Kansas in 1858, when two years of age. He had been born at Vermont in Fulton County, Illinois, in 1856. On coming to Kansas his parents located on a quarter section of land along the Santa Fe Trail in Osage County, in the vicinity of what is now Scranton. It is interesting to note that this old homestead is still owned by the family. While growing up in that rude and simple community Judge Heizer obtained his early education by walking four miles a day to and from the schoolhouse. Subsequently he was sent back to Illinois to attend the common schools, and also had the advantages of the State Normal. For a time he taught, and following the leading of his ambitious for a legal career he spent two years of reading under Judge William Thomson. He was examined and passed the state bar examination under the old law, and for the past thirty-five years had been a successful attorney. Judge Heizer had three brothers,...

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Biography of Charles W. Kent

Charles W. Kent of Coffeyville is a veteran newspaper man of Kansas. His has been an interesting past. He served as a boy soldier in the Union army, and several of his brothers also bore arms for the Stars and Stripes. In a half century of active experience he has largely been identified with the newspaper business, and has been in Southern Kansas about a quarter of a century. On July 7, 1893, he established and brought out the Gate City Independent, the forerunner of the present weekly Independent. For a number of years Coffeyville was familiarly known as the Gate City, since it was in fact the gateway leading from Kansas into old Indian Territory. Since its establishment Mr. Kent has been sole owner and editor of this old and influential newspaper. He now has a modern plant and equipment at 208 East Ninth Street. He also owns the building from which the paper is published. Starting out with a weekly issue, six months later Mr. Kent changed it to a semi-weekly paper, and six months later still he made it a dally and semi-weekly. Since the Spanish-American war the daily has been discontinued and in 1908 he abandoned the semi-weekly edition. It is now a weekly, and this change was made largely to adapt the paper to the needs and demands of the farming community surrounding Coffeyville....

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Knapper, Ellen Mrs. – Obituary

Joseph, Wallowa County, Oregon Funeral services were held on Tuesday afternoon at the Methodist church in Joseph m for Mrs. Ellen M. Knapper, who died Sunday evening, Dec 15.1940. Rev. Ralph Vanderwood was in charge and the Methodist quartet sang Beautiful Isle of Somewhere and Abide with Me. The pall bearers who assisted in the service were Henry Mitchell, P. Mullins, Max Wilson and Polk Mays, of Joseph, and Charles Johnson and Ross Leslie of Enterprise, Interment was made in Prairie Creek Cemetery besides her husband. Mrs. Knapper was born in Astoria Illinois, Feb 3 1862. She married Ludwig Knapper January 2, 1881. She came with her husband to Oregon in the spring of 1882 settling in Pendleton. Six years later they moved to Joseph, which has been her home since that time, except for ten years she spent in Portland after the death of her husband in 1926. She returned to Joseph in 1938. On October 9th of this year she suffered a stroke and was confined to her bed until her death. Mrs. Knapper was a charter member of the Joseph Methodist Ladies Aid which was organized about 45 years ago and was always interested in the general social life of the town. Three children survive their mother, Robert B., of Joseph, Benjamin, of Portland and Mrs. Maude Eberhard, of La Grande. One daughter Addie Schaupp preceded...

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Biography of John E. Kibler

John E. Kibler. Though he did not have the opportunity to attend school regularly after he was thirteen years of age, John E. Kibler found ways and means to acquire a liberal education, and that education had not only sufficed for his own needs but had always made him one of the leading educators in Southeastern Kansas. Mr. Kibler is now county superintendent of schools of Chautauqua County and had been engaged in school work for a long period of years. He came to Kansas when a small boy, but was born in Fulton County, Illinois, June 11, 1863. His grandfather, Frederick Kibler, was a German farmer, and spent all his life in the old country. His father, Jacob Kibler, who was born near Stuttgart, Wuertemberg, Germany, in 1830, grew up on his father’s farm, and about 1851 emigrated to the United States, locating in Fulton County, Illinois. He farmed there a few years, and in 1867 brought his family to Osage County, Kansas, and was one of the pioneers in that section. The Indians had hardly left Osage County, and he pre-empted a claim near Scranton. About 1874 he moved his family to Chantauqua County, and was successfully engaged in farming there until his death in 1880. He was a member of the Lutheran Church. Jacob Kibler married Mary Ellen French, who was born in Lincolnshire, England, in...

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