Location: Fond du Lac Wisconsin

Menominee Indians

Menominee Indians were located on and near the Menominee River, Wisconsin, and in Michigan on or about the present location of Mackinac. The Menominee belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family and to the same section as the Cree and Foxes.

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Biography of John R. Kellogg

JOHN R. KELLOGG. – No compilation that purports to give representation to the leading men of Union county would be complete were there failure to incorporate therein an epitome of the career of the venerable and esteemed gentleman whose name is at the head of this article and who has the distinction of being among the very first dauntless men who made permanent settlement in this favored section, and who is no less distinguished by his faithful labors in all the long years since that have resulted so well in the development and progress of Union county, as well as in the upbuilding of her institutions and the bettering of his fellows. On July 20, 1830, in a village in Oswego county, New York, there was born a son to Martin P. and Melvina (Potter) Kellogg, the subject of our humble sketch. The father was a faithful laborer in the ministry of the Methodist church and moved from place to place, taking our subject at an early age to Holmes county, Ohio, and also to various other sections of that classic commonwealth. At the noted Oberlin College of that state John R. was trained not only in the lore of books, but in the sound principles that have characterized him in his later life of worthy service. At the age of twenty-three he departed from his alma mater and...

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Biography of James M. Kennedy

James M. Kennedy, who had lived in Kansas since 1869, was formerly a teacher, but since 1890 had been an active member of the Fredonia bar. He was born near the City of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, November 11, 1857. His father, Patrick Kennedy, was born in 1832 in County Tipperary, Ireland, came when a young unmarried man to the United States, first locating on a farm near Indianapolis, Indiana, and subsequently removing to Wisconsin, where he was a farmer near Foud du Lac. Just prior to the Civil war he returned to Indianapolis. In 1861 he enlisted in the Eighth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Colonel Oglesby’s regiment. His service as a Union soldier continued for three years and eight months. He fought at Shiloh, Lookout Mountain, and all the battles fought by the army of General Grant in the West. After his honorable discharge from the ranks he returned to Hancock County, Indiana, bought a farm, but in 1869 came to the newer west and took up a claim of 160 acres, twelve miles east of Fredonia, in Wilson County. This land, which he acquired in its virgin state, he developed by many years of labor into a valuable property, and it is now owned by his daughter, Mary. In 1902 he left the farm and lived in Fredonia until his death in 1912. Though a republican, a...

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Charlotte Rachel Todd Deane of Minneapolis MN

DEANE, Charlotte Rachel Todd8, (George T.7, Eli6, Jonah5, Abraham4, Jonah3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Sept. 13, 1855, married Sept. 25, 1889, Daniel P. Deane, who was born Nov. 23, 1842, died Oct. 21, 1913. At one time she taught school in Fond du Lac, Wis. and Minneapolis, Minn. Children: I. Elizabeth Dorothea, b. Jan. 20, 1891, d. young. II. George Brookes, b. Oct. 7, 1893. III. Margaret Louise Keep, b. Oct. 23,...

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Mary Elizabeth Todd Whittelsey of Fond du Lac WI

WHITTELSEY, Mary Elizabeth Todd8, (George T.7, Eli6, Jonah5, Abraham4, Jonah3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born April 22, 1845, married Aug. 21, 1865, John C. Whittelsey, who was born Feb. 17, 1832, died Jan., 1910. She lived in Fond du Lac, Wis. Children: I. Julia Corolie, b. Jan. 23, 1867, d. Nov. 23, 1868. II. Grace Elizabeth, b. Sept. 27, 1868, d. Aug. 8, 1870. III. Mary Elizabeth, b. April 13, 1880, d. May 21,...

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Biography of Captain Lyman C. Waite

Captain Lyman C. Waite is one of the pioneers of Riverside. His association with the foundation of the colony, the establishment of schools, churches, horticultural industries, banking, and other incorporations, commenced in the infancy of the colony, and his various enterprises, both public and private, have been conducted by that sound sense, trained business principles, and honest, straightforward dealings that are characteristic of the man. The facts obtained for a brief review of his life are of interest. Captain Waite was born in Walworth County, Wisconsin, in 1844. His parents, Sydney and Parmelia (Barker) Waite, were natives of western New York. They were pioneers of Wisconsin, having established themselves in that State as early as 1836 or 1837. His father was a farmer by occupation, and during Captain Waite’s boyhood was a resident of Sheboygan Falls, Fond du Lac and Appleton. The subject of this sketch was reared to farm life, and being of a studious disposition was given the best advantages the public schools afforded in securing an education. In 1860 he entered upon a course of study in the Lawrence University at Appleton. The war of the Rebellion and the call upon the nation’s sons to rally to the support of the old flag, and preserve our country from secession rule, enlisted the patriotic sympathy of young Waite, and he abandoned his college studies and promptly entered...

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Biography of John W. Roche

Little would the visitor of today suspect that much of the western part of the City of Rock Island, now built up with modern homes, business houses and factories, was once an uninhabitable swamp; worse than that, it was covered with water to a great extent, and when the Mississippi was high a rapidly flowing stream ran through half the present length of the city, and skiffs, rafts and even steamboats passed over the very place where hundreds now live and work on dry, firm mother earth the year around. The work of reclaiming this tract of land has been one of less than fifty years, and the process has been a gradual one, full of hard work and patience on the part of those actively engaged. Among those who saw the possibilities of this part of the city and who labored long and diligently for its improvement, none deserves greater credit than the subject of this sketch. When he, in 1870, purchased his first lot at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Twelfth Street, water stood upon it at all seasons, varying in depth from two to six feet. Largely by hand labor he and his family filled it, and built a home there. Later they bought other lots till they owned two blocks, which were gradually improved, and now are among the most valuable in the residence...

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Biography of J. P. Comeford

J.P. COMEFORD. – The original owner and builder of the pretty village of Marysville is a native of Ireland, and was born in 1833. While he was a child, his parents emigrated to Canada, and in 1849 came to the United States, going directly to Wisconsin. They resided first at Milwaukee, and then at Fond du Lac, and seven years later removed still farther west to Minnesota. Here he grew up on a farm, driving cattle and learning all the ins and outs of agriculture. In 1861, when the war broke out, he went to St. Louis and joined an independent company of sappers and miners, who were offering their services to the government. For two years he saw hard service at the front, but upon the outbreak of the Sioux war was detailed by General Grant at Memphis, Tenn., at his own request, to return to Minnesota, where his parents resided, to assist in quelling the ferocious savages who had terrorized the whole state. He went to Fort Snelling; and, on receiving a recruiting commission, he, assisted by George Rubles, raised a company of one hundred and ten men for the First Minnesota Mounted Rangers. While in Minnesota, he was present at the hanging of the forty Sioux at Mankato, who participated in the massacre of the Whites. After the company he assisted in recruiting was sworn in,...

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Biographical Sketch of Fred D. Cleaves

FRED D. CLEAVES. – Although among the young men, Mr. Cleaves has for a number of years held responsible public positions. He was born in Stockbridge, Wisconsin, in 1852, residing in that village and at Fond du Lac until ten years of age, and coming in 1864 to this coast with his father’s family. Here is one of the few cases in which we find one of the early settlers returning to the East. After a year’s residence at Whidby Island, and two years at Albany, Oregon, the elder Cleaves recrossed the plains to his old home in Wisconsin. The change gave young Fred a better opportunity for education; but upon reaching man’s estate he still remembered the Pacific coast, and gradually drifted hither. Two years he stopped in Colorado. Finally coming up to Puget Sound, he began professional work, as teacher of penmanship at White River, and in 1880 made his home at La Conner, teaching there a few years. He found more agreeable employment, however, as clerk in the store of B.L. Martin, and afterwards for L.L. Andrews. While in the latter position, he was elected on the Democratic ticket as county treasurer of Skagit county one year, and re-elected in1884. He was also appointed clerk of the district court by Judge Greene, and was continued in this position by Judges Jones, Boyle, Burke and Hanford. He...

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Biographical Sketch of L. L. Silverthorn, M. D.

L. L. Silverthorn, M. D., physician and surgeon, Charleston; was born in Stroudsburg, Monroe, Co., Penn., Oct. 21, 1830; his early life was passed upon a farm; he was the youngest of a family of twelve children, and his father being in moderate circumstances, he was thrown upon his own resources, and obtained only such an education as the common schools afforded; in 1850, he began teaching school, which he continued at intervals for three years; in 1852, he entered upon the study of medicine, in Fond du Lac, Wis.; in 1854, he came to Charleston and continued his studies under the instruction of Dr. T. B. Trower; in September, 1855, be went to Philadelphia, and attended a course of lectures in the Jefferson Medical College, in that city; returning to Charleston, he began the practice of his profession, which he has continued for twenty-two years; he is a member of the ̠sculapian, Society of the Wabash Valley, of which he has been Vice President, and also of the American Medical Association. He was married October 8, 1856, to Miss Amerial Trower, a daughter of the late Dr. T. B. Trower, of Charleston, and has two children РJohn T. and Clara...

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Biographical Sketch of Tusten, H. W.

Tusten, H. W. farmer, P. O. Russell, came here with the Northwestern Colony, in the spring of 1871. He opened the first general store and continued merchandising for six years. At the same time he opened a farm of 320 acres, and now has 200 acres of it under cultivation. He makes a specialty in the stock business, dealing largely in cattle and horses. He keeps the Membrino stock of horses. He was born in Ontario County, N. Y., in 1833, lived in his native State until 1841, and then came with his parents to Kenosha, Wis., where they lived about seven years. Thence went to Green Lake County, where they farmed for some time. He then went to Minnesota and followed various occupations for six years. He then engaged in lumbering at Fond du Lac, Wis., for four years, and in merchandising for three years. Thence he came to Kansas. He was married in 1867 to Miss Matilda de Neveu, a native of the latter city. They have four children – Herman W., Hattie D., Arthur E. and Emma. He is president of the town site, member of the City Council,...

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Biography of Mann, Stillman

Mann, Stillman proprietor of the Russell House. Mr. Mann erected the stone part of his hotel in the summer of 1877; it is 25×48 feet, and three stories high. There is also a wooden addition, 26×68 feet. The hotel cost $7,000. Capacity is about seventy-five guests. He first came to Russell in April 1871, with the Northwestern Colony from Eastern Wisconsin; at that time there was only a section house in the place. He, in company with H. W. Tusten, built a small shanty, and both families lived in that until other arrangements could be made. Mrs. Mann first began to bake bread and sell it to settlers, and finally, after they got more room, they began to lodge people, and that is the way the Russell House first started. The Northwestern Colony were citizens of Ripon, Oshkosh and Fond du Lac, Wis. The biographies of the most active men in this colony will appear in the history of Russell County. Dr. C. W. Bond came with the colony, but remained only a short time and returned to Wisconsin. The only meat the settlers had for over two years was buffalo, deer, antelope and elk, which roamed over the plains in vast herds, and could be shot down in any direction. Mr. Mann was born in Orange County, Vt., in 1825, where he lived until he was twenty-one years...

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Biographical Sketch of Parker, F. L.

Parker, F. L. dealer in grain, lumber and coal. Mr. W. C. Hobbs opened the business in 1871. The firm was changed to Hobbs & Parker in 1879. They carry a stock of about $10,000 in lumber, building material, etc. Mr. Parker came to Russell in the fall of 1877, and became interested in the above business. He was born in Ann Arbor, Mich., July 27, 1848. Moved to Fond du Lac, Wis., with his parents in 1851, where they resided until the fall of 1855, when they moved to Oshkosh, Wis. At a suitable age he engaged in the hardware business, in which he remained about five years. He then embarked in the manufacture of handles, also the woodwork of carriages and wagons, until he came to Kansas. He was married on March 28, 1871, to Miss Lizzie V. Hobbs. They have two children – William H. and Frederick L. Mr. Parker is a member of Pioneer Lodge, No. 43, A. O. U. W., of Russell. Has been a member of the City Council,...

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