Location: Fayette County KY

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

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Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky

COLEMAN Horace W., b. 12 Oct. 1868, d. 1 Mar. 1910. PAYNE John, b. 30 June 1837, d. 25 June 1914. Husb. of Mary A, Mary A., b. 1859, d. 1899. MOORE Samuel, d. 7 Feb. 1855, age 54 yrs. Husb. of Mary J. Risk Mary J. Risk, b. 28 Dec. 1812, d. 23 Dec. 1903. Mary, wife of David Mooris, b. 4 Jan. 1859, d. 16 Jan. 1873. Los A., b. 25 Feb. 1851, d. 20 Mar. 1907. Samuel A., b. 21 Mar. 1837, d. 7 Sept. 1865. Churchill, b. 1846, d. 1898. BUTLER James C., b. 29 Aug. 1811, d. 15 Sept. 1888. Husb. of Lucy A. and Sarah H. Lucy A., b. 24 Dec. 1824, d. 26 Feb. 1912. Sarah H., d. 20 Oct. 1836, age 20 yrs., 11 mos. DAVIS Allen, b. 19 Jan. 1805, d. 21 Mar. 1861. Husb., of Betsey. Betsey, b. 15 Feb. 1807, d. 3 Dec. 1885. William P., b. 9 Jan. 1818, d. 3D Mar. 1881. Husb. of Elizabeth P. Elizabeth P., b. 22 Nov. 1821, d. 5 May 1884. Edwin S., b. 5 Apr. 1846, d. 2 July 1879. Somerville A., b. 29 Aug. 1846, d. 29 May 1918. STONE Mary Davis, d. 12 Apr. 1879. HOOD Eleanor Davis, d. 14 Sept. 1872. DAVIS Elizabeth N., b. 4 Oct. 1871. DAVIS William Todd, son of E. S. and S....

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas R. Shaw

Was born near Decatur, Macon county, Illinois, June 19, 1845. In 1846. his parents removed to Iowa and settled near Mount Pleasant. He completed his education in the Mount Pleasant high school under Prof. John. A. Smith, in 1861. From that time until 1864, he was employed as a clerk, excepting one year spent in visiting relatives at Lexington, Kentucky. In 1864 he enlisted in Company A, Forty-fifth Iowa Volunteer Infantry for a term of 100 days. At the expiration of his enlistment he returned home and soon after made a prospecting tour to the Missouri River, visiting Omaha, Plattsmouth, and Nebraska City, and finally came to Gallatin in September 1865, where he began the study of law under Col. James H. B. McFerran and was admitted to the bar in May, 1865, by the Hon. K A. DeBolt and at once began the practice of law at Gallatin. In 1871 he was appointed, public administrator, to fill a vacancy, by Gov. Joseph McClurg, and in 1872 was elected to the same position. In 1876 he was elected Probate Judge and in 1880 was reelected his own successor. September, 1867, Mr. Shaw was joined in marriage to Miss Jane Buchhols, a lady who was born and reared in Gallatin. They have five children; namely, Pinkie, Milo Francis, Charles Lewis, Preston and an...

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Biographical Sketch of Wilburn K. Nation

Wilburn K. Nation was born near Lexington, Kentucky, July 1, 1817. His father was a native of South Carolina. When he was a child his parents moved to Claiborne county, Tennessee, and in 1833 to Callaway county, Missouri, and in 1835 to this county. He participated in driving out the Mormons from this county, and was at the battle of Honn’s Mill, in Caldwell county. Mr. Nation was united in marriage, November 8, 1841, to Miss Nancy Tarwater, who was born September 23, 1818, and is the daughter of John Tarwater, who was the third white man that settled in this county, and who started the first ferry on Grand River in Daviess county; he settled in this county February 25, 1830. She is the oldest settler to-day in this county. By this union they have eleven children: Lithey M., born August 14, 1842; Phoebe A., born August 1, 1844; John C., born September 2, 1846; William E., born November 13, 1848; Isaac H., born January 3, 1851; Ruth J., born June. 12, 1853; Mary O., born August 28, 1855; Nancy C., born October 8, 1857; Sarah E., born August 21, 1860; Wilburn K., born December 8, 1862; and Louisa M., born April 10, 1865. Mr. Nation has made farming his business through...

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Biography of Hon. James B. Reavis

Much interest attaches to the life and work of an attorney such as Mr. Reavis, whose chief endeavor both privately and professionally has been to realize a high degree of public justice. He is a man whom the people feel safe in having by; for they can trust his sagacity and integrity, knowing that he is thoroughly incorruptible by any influence, corporate or otherwise. He is one of the men of whom both unscrupulous politicians and monopolies have a wholesome fear. Glancing at his ancestry, we observe that he came honestly by these rugged qualities, being in lineal descent from among those who have subdued and civilized America. He was born in Boone county, Missouri, in 1848. His parents were Kentuckians, his grandparents Virginians, and on the maternal side were descended from the colonial Lee family of Revolutionary fame. Mr. Reavis received his education at Lexington, Kentucky, and studying law was admitted to practice at Hannibal, Missouri, in 1872. He also began to exert a wide influence in that state as the editor of the Appeal, at Monroe; but his prospects in journalism were voluntarily relinquished in view of his removal to California in 1874. In that state he engaged in the practice of his profession, making his home at Chico. His characteristic and hereditary restlessness, however, led him to seek a new field, and in 1880 he came...

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Biographical Sketch of William Bush

William Bush, of Fayette Co., Ky., had Benjamin, Ambrose, Levi, and Matilda. Benjamin married and settled in Illinois, on the bank of the Mississippi river, and was murdered under the following circumstances Parties on the opposite side of the river owed him a considerable amount of money, and he went over on the ferryboat, one day, to collect it. As he was returning that evening he was robbed while on the boat, and then thrown into the river. Levi and Matilda Bush both married and lived and died in Kentucky. Ambrose married Nancy Douglass, and settled first in Illinois, near his brother Benjamin, where he remained one year, and then in 1818, he removed to Missouri and settled at Charrette, in Warren County. In 1818 he settled on Dry Fork of Loutre, in Montgomery County. Mr. Bush was a shrewd business man, and made a fortune by trading in horses and other stock. He had a low, soft voice and gentlemanly manners, and was a general favorite with his neighbors. He died in 1873, at the advanced age of 88 years. His wife died many years previous. Their children were Greenberry, Maria, Edward D., William, and Ella. Greenbury married Sarah Cundiff, and they had-William D., Eliza A., Nancy J., Amanda G., Caroline, Mary, Clay, Edward W., Virginia, and Susan. Mr. Bush served as Sheriff and Assessor of Montgomery County...

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Slave Narrative of John W. Fields

Interviewer: Cecil Miller Person Interviewed: John W. Fields Location: Lafayette, Indiana Place of Birth: Owensburg, KY Date of Birth: March 27, 1848 Age: 89 Place of Residence: N. 20th St., Lafayette, Indiana Cecil C. Miller Dist. #3 Tippecanoe Co. INTERVIEW WITH MR. JOHN W. FIELDS, EX-SLAVE OF CIVIL WAR PERIOD September 17, 1937 John W. Fields, 2120 North Twentieth Street, Lafayette, Indiana, now employed as a domestic by Judge Burnett is a typical example of a fine colored gentleman, who, despite his lowly birth and adverse circumstances, has labored and economized until he has acquired a respected place in his home community. He is the owner of three properties; un-mortgaged, and is a member of the colored Baptist Church of Lafayette. As will later be seen his life has been one of constant effort to better himself spiritually and physically. He is a fine example of a man who has lived a morally and physically clean life. But, as for his life, I will let Mr. Fields speak for himself: “My name is John W. Fields and I’m eighty-nine (89) years old. I was born March 27, 1848 in Owensburg, Ky. That’s 115 miles below Louisville, Ky. There was 11 other children besides myself in my family. When I was six years old, all of us children were taken from my parents, because my master died and his estate...

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Biography of Charles G. Blakely

Charles G. Blakely, whose attainments as a business man have made his name familiar not only in his home City of Topeka but in many parts of the state, has been a resident of Kansas since the fall of 1883, and his first experience here was as teacher in Brown County. His is the interesting story of a boy born and reared in the mountainens district of Eastern Kentucky, where people lived on the plane of the simplest existence but not always of the highest ideals. There, in his early youth, came a stimulus to his ambition and hope which raised him out of his circumstances, and by self-help he struggled upward on the road of aspiration and finally made himself a place among the world’s influential workers. In the early days of Kentucky about the time Daniel Boone made history from the “dark and bloody ground,” members of the Blakely and Brown families from North Carolina and Virginia respectively settled within the borders of that commonwealth, and aided in reclaiming it from the domain of the wilderness, fought wild beasts and wild Indians, and for several generations lived peacefully and contentedly in the mountainous districts of the state. Many years later John Chestnut Blakely, a native of the mountains of Laurel County and Sarah Brown of the Bluegrass region, met and married, and they were the parents of...

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Biographical Sketch of William McChesney Martin

William McChesney Martin, born in Lexington, Kentucky, July 2, 1874; son of Thomas L. Martin and Hettie (McChesney); attended Higgins school and Alleghan Academy (Professor A. N. Gordon), Lexington, Kentucky; A. B., 1895, Washington and Lee University; LL. B., 1900, Washington University Law School; married Mary Rebecca Woods of St. Louis, November 21, 1905; children William McChesney Martin, Jr., and Malcolm Woods Martin; moved to St. Louis, as secretary to superintendent of terminals, Louisville & Nashville Railroad, March 1, 1896; chief clerk to division passenger agent, same road, 1898-99; resigned to attend law school; admitted to St. Louis bar, June 15, 1900; substitute teacher English classics, Smith Academy (St. Louis), 1899; entered trust department, Mississippi Valley Trust Company latter part of 1900 to take care of legal work in connection with estates; elected safe deposit officer of Mississippi Valley Trust Company, April 1, 1904; elected assistant bond officer same company, December, 1905; elected assistant trust officer and assistant bond officer of same company, 1908; elected vice president same company, April 22, 1914; resigned to accept position as chairman of the board and federal reserve agent of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, to which he was appointed September 30, 1914; author of several books and monographs on the law and practice of banking; member of American Bar Association; member St. Louis Bar Association; Presbyterian; clubs, Noonday, City, University,...

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Biography of James Sidney Rollins

James Sidney Rollins, lawyer and statesman, distinguished for extraordinary public services, was born April 19, 1812, at Richmond, Kentucky, and died at Columbia, Missouri, January 9, 1888, in the seventy-sixth year of his age. His parents were Anthony Wayne and Sallie Harris (Rodes) Rollins. The father was a native of Pennsylvania, a graduate of Jefferson College in that state and an eminent physician. He was a son of Henry Rollins, who was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, emigrated to America during the Revolutionary war, enlisted in the Continental army and fought in the battle of Brandywine. The mother, a lady of refinement and beautiful character, was a native of Madison county, Kentucky. James Sidney Rollins was educated in Washington College of Pennsylvania and in the University of Indiana at Bloomington, being graduated from the latter institution in 1830 with the highest honors and as valedictorian of his class. His parents having removed to Boone county, Missouri, he followed them after his graduation, taking charge of the large farm upon which they had located. During the same time he read law under the instruction of Judge Abiel Leonard of Fayette. During the Black Hawk war, in 1832, he acted as aide-de-camp on the staff of Major General Richard Gentry and was actively engaged for six months on the Des Moines river, deriving from this service the title of major. He...

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Biography of Capt. George Fry

CAPT. GEORGE FRY, an old and honored citizen of Shannon County, Missouri, is a native of the Buckeye State, born in Franklin County in 1817. His father, George Fry, was a native of Pennsylvania, who went to Ohio in 1812 or 1813, floating down the Ohio River to the Sciota in flatboats with his family and household effects. He then went up the Sciota where he afterwards located, and there passed the balance of his days, dying when seventy-seven years of age. He was in the Indian War, and was in the battle of Tippecanoe. When he first went to Ohio the Indians were still there; in fact that State had only been admitted into the Union about ten years, and was but sparsely settled. Capt. George Fry, who was one of seven children, spent his school days in Athens County, Ohio, whither his parents had moved, and there reached man-hood. He turned his attention to farming at first, but afterward was superintendent of the iron works at Vinton Station, Vinton County, for fifteen years. Following this he took up railroad contracting on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, and afterward, in 1869, went to West Virginia, and was on the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad. He was also in Kentucky on a railroad south of Lexington, and all the time was building railroad bridges, etc. Later he came West with...

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Biography of Thomas M. Jeffreys

Thomas M. Jeffreys, probate judge and superintendent of public instruction in Washington County, Idaho, is a native of Oregon, his birth having occurred in Yamhill County, on the 7th of April 1852. His father, Woodson Jeffreys, was born in Jackson County, Missouri, in 1825, and in early manhood, in Oregon, married Jane Forrest, also a native of Missouri. They crossed the plains to Oregon in 1845, being nine months in accomplishing the long and weary journey across the plains, their way being beset by many obstacles, difficulties and dangers. They located on government land in Yamhill County, and during the first winter suffered many hardships and privations. Their stock of provisions was almost exhausted and they subsisted on boiled wheat and what game they could kill. Mr. Jeffreys also participated in the wars with the Indians in those early years of his residence in the northwest, and was a brave pioneer and a man of sterling character. In 1865 he came to Idaho, accompanied by his wife and five children, and purchased three hundred and twenty acres of land at Weiser, where he built a residence and began the development of the farm upon which his widow yet resides. In connection with his brother he was extensively engaged in stock raising, both in Oregon and Idaho. They were enterprising, ambitious and fearless, and recognizing an excellent business opportunity, they...

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Biography of James A. Masterson

JAMES A. MASTERSON. – It now becomes our pleasant privilege to outline the interesting career of the estimable gentleman, whose name is at the ehad of this article, and who stands as one of the prominent and representative men of Union county, being also aheavy property owner, and having manifested since an early day here ability that was master of the situation and has acuumulated his holdings from the raw resources of the county, while also he has maintained an untarnished reputation and has done much for the advancement of the county, being really one of the builders of Union county. In Lexington, Kentucky, on October 10, 1842, our subject was born to William A. and Elizabeth J. (Violet) Masterson, natives respectively of Kentucky and Pennnsylvania. The father was a mill wright and went to Lexington, Missouri, in 1843, and as early as 1851, brought his family over the barren trail to Lane county, Oregon. He took a donatin claim and gave his attention to farming and stock raising until September 8,1890, when he was called to the world beyond. The mother is living in Lagrande, being a property owner of the city. In 1863, our subject stepped from the parental roof and launched out into life’s activities for himself, mining first and then returned in fall of 1864, to the Willamette valley and fitted out, in connection with...

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Biographical Sketch of John Blechschmid

Blechschmid, John; florist; born, Germany, June 7, 1870; son of John and Christina Hess Blechschmid; educated, public schools, Germany, and Newport, Ky.; married, Cleveland, April 26, 1906, Marie Sterk; three children; 1893, worked for Eugene Walter, florist, Lexington, Ky.; one year for Wm. Jones, florist, Newport, Ky.; one year for Mrs. Hennings, florist, Cincinnati, and several other firms and private parties; then was in Indianapolis, Ind.; then back to Cincinnati, as head gardener in The Zoo; was there two years; in 1904, started his own business in Cleveland; designer and decorator; vice. pres. The Florist...

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Biographical Sketch of John McKinney

John McKinney, of Staunton, Virginia, served in the American army during the latter part of the revolution, and had his thigh broken by a musket ball, which lamed him for life. He settled at Lexington, Kentucky, where he taught school, and was elected Sheriff of the County. He married a Mexican woman, by whom he raised a large family. In 1805 he came to Missouri on a trading and prospecting tour, and in 1809 he moved his family here. When the Indian war began, he took his family back to Kentucky, to get them out of danger. His son Alexander remained married Nancy Bryan, who was only sixteen years of age, and settled near Charrette creek, in (now) Warren County. He was a surveyor and a fine business man, and accumulated a fortune before his death. He also served in the State Legislature during several sessions. His sister Elizabeth married John King, who settled near Marthasville. John McKinney traveled back and forth between Kentucky and Missouri as long as he lived, trading in land and land...

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