Location: Falls County TX

Slave Narrative of Bob Maynard

Person Interviewed: Bob Maynard Location: 23 East Choctaw, Weleetka, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Marlin, Texas, Falls County Age: 79 I was born near what is now Marlin, Texas, Falls County. My father was Robert Maynard and my mother was Chanie Maynard, both born slaves. Our Master, Gerard Branum, was a very old man and wore long white whiskers. He sho’ was a fine built man, and walked straight and tall like a young man. I was too little to do much work so my job was to carry the key basket for old Mistress. I sho’ was proud of that job. The basked held the keys to the pantry, the kitchen, the linen closet, and extra keys to the rooms and smokehouse. When old Mistress started out on her rounds every morning sho’d call to me to get de basket and away we’d go. I’d run errands for all the house help too, so I was kept purty busy. The “big house” was a fine one. It was a big two-story white house made of pine lumber. There was a big porch or veranda across the front and wings on the east and west. The house faced south. There was big round white posts that went clean up to the roof and there was a big porch upstairs too. I believe the house was whet you’d call colonial style....

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Biographical Sketch of William Hardin Weathers

One of the men who have wrought for the welfare of Wallowa county, as well as doing worthy enterprise for his advancement in the world of industry, is named at the head of this article, and we wish to mention that he is held in the esteem and confidence of his fellows, which his abilities and excellent moral qualities have given him both a prestige and standing that are enviable. William H. was born in Jasper County, Missouri, on August 15, 1849, being the son of John and Elizabeth (Selinger) Weathers. When he was five years of age he was taken by his parents to Falls County, Texas, where he was bereft of both parents, their remains sleeping in that section today. In 1862, when sad strife was being precipitated, our subject was with the people where he lived and as he thought was right so he enlisted in the Fifteenth Texas Infantry, Company E. and in that relation did service in the Confederate army until the close of the war and then he was honorably discharged. He had participated in several battles at Shreveport and numerous others, as well as many skirmishes. Subsequent to the war he was following industrial pursuits until 1869 and then on horseback, by cars and with stage he made the journey from the states to La Grande, Oregon. He was occupied variously here...

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